300 episodes

Podcast of The City Club of Cleveland's Friday Forum and other City Club events.

The City Club of Cleveland Podcast Unknown

    • Politics
    • 5.0, 13 Ratings

Podcast of The City Club of Cleveland's Friday Forum and other City Club events.

    America's Crisis: Are We Finally Ready to Confront Racism?

    America's Crisis: Are We Finally Ready to Confront Racism?

    Days of protest, the likes of which we haven't seen in decades, happened in cities, towns, and suburbs across the country. In Cleveland, a peaceful protest turned violent. Police, in an attempt to disperse demonstrators, sent flash grenades, canisters of tear gas, pepper balls, and wooden bullets into the crowd. The events of the last two weeks: the murder, the protests that followed, the violence that followed the protests, both in Cleveland and around the country, are all part of a historical pattern. And, they represent a culmination of all the consequences of the failures of government and the political and economic establishments to resolve those crises. What happens now? Are we, as a city, ready to finally confront racism? Can there be true change when it comes to dismantling our racist structures?

    June 4, 2020: Racism and Public Health: Cleveland's Response

    June 4, 2020: Racism and Public Health: Cleveland's Response

    On Wednesday, June 3, Cleveland City Council passed a new piece of legislation to declare racism a public health crisis in the City of Cleveland. The legislation--sponsored by Councilmen Blaine Griffin, Basheer Jones, and Kerry McCormack--means that the city formally recognizes racism as a crisis that damages public health through discrimination. One year ago, Milwaukee, Wisconsin was believed to be the first city to declare racism a public health crisis.

    Similar pieces of legislation are being presented in cities and states across the country. In Ohio, two identical resolutions will be introduced by the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus--one for the Ohio House and one for the Senate. According to the Centers for Disease Control, whenever a declaration of a public health crisis is made, systems need to be put in place to remediate the health crisis. What does that mean for Cleveland? How can we ensure that actual action is taken?

    Councilman Blaine Griffin represents Ward 6, encompassing the East Side neighborhoods of Fairfax, Larchmere, Little Italy, Woodland Hills, and parts of Buckeye-Shaker, University Circle, North Broadway, Slavic Village, and Union-Miles. He is chairman of council's Health & Human Services Committee and sits on four other committees. Prior to serving on council, Councilman Griffin was Executive Director of the city's Community Relation's Board, which works to improve cross-culture relations throughout the city and oversees police/community relations and youth initiatives.

    Joins us for a conversation with Councilman Griffin about the resolution and a range of other issues.

    May 29, 2020: At the Border: Policies, People, and How You Can Get Involved

    May 29, 2020: At the Border: Policies, People, and How You Can Get Involved

    Immigration has become one of the most hotly debated topics in our country. The debates only intensified as the coronavirus pandemic swept the country. Restrictions on land and air travel, closures of the U.S. land borders with Mexico and Canada, and a 60-day, temporary halt on the issuance of certain green cards are causing fear and anxiety in immigrants and asylum seekers. Crystal Massey works at the border, connecting volunteers throughout the country to remote and in-person volunteer opportunities and works closely with local border groups providing legal and humanitarian assistance to asylum seekers. Her work with the Immigration Justice Campaign -- a joint initiative between the American Immigration Council and the American Immigration Lawyers Association -- increases pro bono legal representation for detained immigrants, only 14 percent of whom have access to counsel. Join us as Massey shares a brief history of Border Patrol, who qualifies for asylum and how, and how the recent border policies enacted during the pandemic are impacting asylum seekers.

    May 22, 2020: How Will the Pandemic Change Healthcare Delivery?

    May 22, 2020: How Will the Pandemic Change Healthcare Delivery?

    The coronavirus pandemic has put unprecedented pressure on the American healthcare system. It also caused healthcare systems to rethink how to deliver care to patients not infected with the coronavirus. Long-held regulations around telemedicine services, professional licensing, and restrictions on healthcare workers relaxed. Despite these efforts, hospitals still lost millions of dollars in revenue as elective surgeries were canceled and patients, fearing they might contract the virus, skipped in-person treatments and routine screenings and appointments. This is a trend that is likely to continue -- according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, as many as 27 million Americans have lost employer-sponsored health insurance due to job loss during the crisis. What does all of this mean for the future of the healthcare delivery?

    May 20, 2020: Reopening and Reconnecting: Preparing for a New Normal

    May 20, 2020: Reopening and Reconnecting: Preparing for a New Normal

    All over the world, cities are beginning to re-open after months of sheltering in place…and facing a new reality. Retail stores, restaurants and bars, and office environments are grappling with new restrictions to keep people safe and prevent the spread of the coronavirus. In addition, many of the large public gatherings that bring people together as a community are postponed or canceled. These new realities are causing many to rethink and reimagine the way we construct and use physical space, and how we connect and convene a neighborhood and its residents. Here in Cleveland, there is conversation about potentially closing West 25th Street. How are other neighborhoods preparing for this new normal? What is being done to support neighborhood small businesses, restaurants, and cafes

    May 15, 2020: Return to the Statehouse: What Policy Priorities will Prevail?

    May 15, 2020: Return to the Statehouse: What Policy Priorities will Prevail?

    After sheltering in place for nearly two months, Ohioans -- and Ohio's economy -- are beginning to emerge and prepare for a new reality. The public health and economic crisis brought on by the coronavirus has had dramatic and far-reaching implications. In response, Republicans and Democrats have proposed dozens of bills covering everything from paid family leave to the sales tax that people pay on personal protective equipment to increasing COVID-19 testing and tracing. But the pandemic has cost Ohio's government about $1 billion in lost revenue, resulting in Governor DeWine's announcement of $775 million in budget cuts over the next two months. As Ohio lawmakers return to work for the first time since March 25, what policy responses will be prioritized?

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

clvlndr ,

Online!

So glad these talks are made available as podcasts that can be downloaded at any time. Thank you!!

Randybowling2593 ,

Great Podcast

Great podcasts for anyone wanting to learn more about Cleveland and civics in general.

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