288 episodes

The Climate Pod is a wide-ranging conversation with leading experts on the politics, economics, activism, culture, science, and social justice issues at the heart of the climate crisis. Hear from guests like Jane Goodall, Bill McKibben, Al Roker, David Wallace-Wells, Katharine Hayhoe, Adam McKay, Bill Nye, Robert Bullard, Catherine Coleman Flowers, Ted Danson, Gina McCarthy, Paul Krugman, and many more. Hosted by brothers Ty and Brock Benefiel.

The Climate Pod The Climate Pod

    • News
    • 4.6 • 275 Ratings

The Climate Pod is a wide-ranging conversation with leading experts on the politics, economics, activism, culture, science, and social justice issues at the heart of the climate crisis. Hear from guests like Jane Goodall, Bill McKibben, Al Roker, David Wallace-Wells, Katharine Hayhoe, Adam McKay, Bill Nye, Robert Bullard, Catherine Coleman Flowers, Ted Danson, Gina McCarthy, Paul Krugman, and many more. Hosted by brothers Ty and Brock Benefiel.

    CNN's Bill Weir On The Life Lessons Found In Climate Reporting

    CNN's Bill Weir On The Life Lessons Found In Climate Reporting

    For years, we've watched as Bill Weir has brought climate storytelling to one of the biggest news networks on television. On CNN, Bill has traveled the world to cover everything from extreme weather disasters to cutting-edge climate solutions. And throughout an incredibly eventful career, he's learned life lessons he hopes his children and others will consider to preserve what we love most on this warming planet. Bill joins the show this week to explain why chose this career path, what he enjoyed most about his early days as a sports reporter and actor, and what he sets out to accomplish every day on the climate beat. 
    Bill Weir is the Chief Climate Correspondent at CNN. He’s an Emmy Award-winning journalist, who has reported from all fifty states and more than 50 countries on every continent. His new book is Life as we Know it (Can Be) - Stories of People, Climate, and Hope in a Changing World. 
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.
     
     

    • 1 hr 9 min
    The Washington Post's Shannon Osaka On Microplastics, Extreme Weather Costs, And Covering Climate In 2024

    The Washington Post's Shannon Osaka On Microplastics, Extreme Weather Costs, And Covering Climate In 2024

    Shannon Osaka has been one of our favorite climate journalists for years. So we were incredibly excited to have her on this week for a wide-ranging conversation on a variety of climate issues - like microplastics, extreme weather costs in the US, and covering climate change as we exceed 1.5 degrees of warming above pre-industrial levels. Shannon also explains how she got into climate journalism after studying the science of climate change, how she approaches her work, and the challenges of covering climate in 2024. 
    Shannon Osaka is a climate reporter covering policy, culture, and science for The Washington Post. Read her recent pieces we discuss on this week's episode:
    Why Americans pay so much more than anyone else for weather disasters
    With microplastics, scientists are in a race against time
    Earth breached a feared level of warming over the past year. Are we doomed?
    Read more of Shannon's work here
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.
     

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Why Capitalism Won't Save the Planet (w/ Brett Christophers)

    Why Capitalism Won't Save the Planet (w/ Brett Christophers)

    For decades, the biggest pushback against renewable energy was that it was more expensive to generate than electricity that came from the burning of fossil fuels. But all that changed in 2016 when both solar and wind-generated electricity became cheaper than electricity generated by coal and natural gas, at least when using the industry-standard metric, Levelized Cost of Energy. Despite the fact that renewable energy has overcome its biggest obstacle and can now be generated cheaper than fossil fuels, investments in fossil fuels continue to increase and new renewable generation development is not keeping pace with increases in demand. What happened?
    Brett Christophers is a Professor at the Institute for Housing and Urban Research at Uppsala University. He joined the podcast this week to explain why price isn't the most important metric to look at when determining the prospects for the development of clean energy projects. His new book, "The Price is Wrong: Why Capitalism Won't Save the Planet", provides some answers to the question of why renewables aren't growing as quickly as we need them to, given that the price of renewables have fallen well below their fossil fuel counterparts. His critiques of capitalism, energy markets, and our fascination with the Levelized Cost of Energy are some of the most compelling arguments you're likely to hear on why we need transformative changes instead of incremental reforms to our existing economic system, especially when it comes to how electricity is bought and sold.
    Read "The Price is Wrong"
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.
     

    • 1 hr 16 min
    How Do You Behave Ethically In A Climate Crisis? (w/ Travis Rieder)

    How Do You Behave Ethically In A Climate Crisis? (w/ Travis Rieder)

    The climate crisis presents us with a number of moral challenges. We all produce emissions, but there are massive differences and inequities in how much pollution each individual is responsible for and who is harmed the most by the consequences. As the very real impacts of the crisis only become more obvious and deadly, we continue to ask ourselves: what is our responsibility? 
    In this week's show, we dig into some of the tough ethical considerations for living in a climate crisis. To do so, we talk to Travis Rieder, an associate research professor at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Rieder is the author of multiple books including In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids. His latest book is Catastrophe Ethics: How to Choose Well in a World of Tough Choices. We discuss the conversations around individual responsibility vs. collective action, how to determine our best path for fighting climate change, and what it means to exist between purity and nihilism. 
    Read Catastrophe Ethics: How to Choose Well in a World of Tough Choices
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.
     
     

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Elizabeth Kolbert on Climate Rhetoric vs Climate Reality

    Elizabeth Kolbert on Climate Rhetoric vs Climate Reality

    In 2021, Greta Thunberg spoke to the youth climate movement at an event leading up to COP26. Her famous "Blah, Blah, Blah" speech contrasted all of the things world leaders had said about the climate crisis and what those same leaders had actually done to reduce emissions and create policies to mitigate and adapt to the climate crisis. Three years later, very little has changed. Of the 128 countries that set Net Zero goals, only five percent have taken the required first steps toward achieving those goals.
    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elizabeth Kolbert joins the podcast this week to discuss how the climate crisis gets talked about by world leaders, activists, scientists, and the media may differ from the actual facts of the world's warming situation. Her new book "H is for Hope: Climate Change from A to Z" is a collection of 26 essays on various aspects of the climate crisis which tell the complete picture of what's going on, what's led us to this point, and where we could go from here.
    Like Elizabeth's previous books, such as "Field Notes from a Catastrophe", "The Sixth Extinction", and "Under a White Sky", "H is for Hope" is an insightful and sobering book from one of today's great climate writers.
    Read "H is for Hope" 
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.

    • 44 min
    Degrowth, Malthus, and the Climate Crisis (w/ Giorgos Kallis)

    Degrowth, Malthus, and the Climate Crisis (w/ Giorgos Kallis)

    Over the last century, economic growth, as measured by increases in countries' Gross Domestic Product, has been the key indicator of success. And while GDP has skyrocketed in many countries, so has fossil fuel use, deforestation, and the destruction of natural ecosystems. On top of that, inequality has actually gotten worse in many countries and incomes, adjusted for inflation, have stagnated for many parts of these "growing" economies. It seems this relentless focus on growth has not created the kind of world that most people want to live in.
    Professor Giorgos Kallis is an ecological economist, political ecologist, and Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies Professor at the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology in Barcelona. He's also the author of several books about degrowth economics - the field of economics that questions the insatiable need for growth and seeks an alternative societal structure that supports everyone, regardless of a country's ability to grow GDP. Professor Kallis joins the show to talk about degrowth economics and why it is critical to achieve the degrowth goals if we want to reduce the negative impacts of the climate crisis.
    We also discuss the role that 18th century philosopher and theologian Thomas Malthus had on modern economics, why he was so wrong about inequality and limits, and some of the ideas that get attributed to him that weren't actually his.
    Check out these two books by Professor Kallis:
    "The Case for Degrowth"
    "Limits: Why Malthus Was Wrong and Why Environmentalists Should Care"
    As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group.
     

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
275 Ratings

275 Ratings

Nevada Bob from Reno ,

Never miss an episode

I listen to nearly every climate podcast I come across and have yet to find one with such consistently engaging and useful discussions. It’s like we’ve been invited to not just listen in to compelling climate conversations, but to be a part of them.

Jannacabanna ,

refreshing and true takes on our world right now

I am teaching adults to teach young children (ages 3-6) about our environment and our human impact on it. Some call it environmental literacy or climate education, but I like to think of it as the curriculum as the foundations of learning to understand and love our planet and all life on it. I very much enjoy this podcast as it keeps me connected to a wide range of adult discussions in the world, full of curiosity, real experiences, timely information, and differing opinions. We need all of this to shift our world into a healthier happier paradigm for all, so keep these conversations going with adults and I’ll be listening!

I particularly enjoyed a recent episode, a brave take on the anti-capitalism, for two reasons: it was a fresh opinion that I think many can noodle on, AND I am currently reading “A Pirate Looks At Fifty” by Jimmy Buffett and his adventures and intrigue with Cuba and Key West in the 70s. So, that last CTA for reviews got to the parrothead in me! Here are a well-earned 5 ⭐️ + a Jimmy Buffett quote, from “Jimmy Dreams” on Barometer Soup because we all need to look for what we love on this beautiful Earth and dream bigger together. Keep it up, Climate Pod and RIP James William Buffett.

“ IT'S THE SOUND OF THE LOW TIDE,
THE SMELL OF THE RAIN
TRAVELIN' ALONE
ON MY BOAT AND MY PLANE
TAKE IT ALL IN IT'S AS BIG AS IT SEEMS
COUNT ALL YOUR BLESSINGS
REMEMBER YOUR DREAMS”

nancylaplaca ,

Excellent podcast

There are many climate podcasts to listen to, and IMHO this is one of the best. Kudos to these brothers who tackle difficult subjects that are critically important. Thank you!

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