645 episodes

We’re living through a climate emergency; addressing this crisis begins by talking about it. Host Greg Dalton brings you empowering conversations that connect all aspects of the challenge — the scary and the exciting, the individual and the systemic. Join us.

Climate One Climate One from The Commonwealth Club

    • Science
    • 4.7 • 322 Ratings

We’re living through a climate emergency; addressing this crisis begins by talking about it. Host Greg Dalton brings you empowering conversations that connect all aspects of the challenge — the scary and the exciting, the individual and the systemic. Join us.

    What the Infrastructure Deal Means for Climate

    What the Infrastructure Deal Means for Climate

    President Biden recently signed the biggest piece of climate legislation in U.S. history into law. To be sure, the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act got pared down significantly from what was first put on the table, but the final measure still contains five times more money for projects aimed at mitigating the climate crisis than the best legislation the Obama administration could get through. What did it take to get 19 Republican senators (not to mention Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema) to vote with the Democrats? And with the states being given great latitude over how to spend the money, will the billions available for highways negate any positive climate impacts?
    For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts 
    Guests:
    Carla Frisch, Principal Deputy Director, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Energy 
    Sasha Mackler, Executive Director, The Energy Project, Bipartisan Policy Center
    Beth Osborne, Director, Transportation for America
    Michael Grunwald, journalist, author, The New New Deal
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    climateone.org/donate


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    • 59 min
    REWIND Finding the Heart to Talk About Climate

    REWIND Finding the Heart to Talk About Climate

    Ever have a difficult conversation about climate? Pretty much everyone has. Knowing all the facts and figures only goes so far when talking to someone who just doesn’t agree. So how do we break through the barriers? Scientists trained to present information in a one-way lecture format face a particular challenge: they first need to unlearn old habits.
    “Everybody's trying to figure out ‘how do we move past this idea that just arming people with facts will lead to a better world,’ right, because we’ve just seen that that’s absolutely not true,” says Faith Kearns, author of Getting to the Heart of Science Communication. 
    Kearns argues that we all need to move from an “information deficit” model of communication – where it’s assumed that the audience simply needs more information – to a relational model, where the science communicator does as much listening as talking in order to first find empathy and common ground.
    Guests:
    Faith Kearns, author, Getting to the Heart of Science Communication
    Katerina Gonzales, doctoral research fellow, Stanford University

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    • 54 min
    Taking Stock of COP26

    Taking Stock of COP26

    In 2015, delegates from 196 nations entered into the legally binding treaty on climate change known as the Paris Agreement, which set a goal of limiting global warming to “well below 2 and preferably to 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to pre-industrial levels.” Yet in August of this year, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a new assessment report that starkly illustrated the world’s collective failure to meet that target. Delegates from across the globe have just met in Glasgow for the international climate summit known as COP26, with the hope of strengthening commitments to keep emissions targets at that 1.5 degree level. 
    After two weeks of negotiations, presentations and protests in Glasgow, COP26 is a wrap. This week we discuss what was achieved - and what wasn’t - at the summit. 
    For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts 
    Guests:
    Vanessa Nakate, Ugandan climate activist
    Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley
    Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance

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    • 1 hr 8 min
    Climbing, Conservation and Capitalism

    Climbing, Conservation and Capitalism

    Rick Ridgeway estimates he’s spent about five years of his life sleeping in tents, often in the world’s most remote places alongside fellow outdoor adventure luminaries. Ridgeway worked for Patagonia for 15 years and was behind the company’s infamous “Don’t Buy This Jacket” ad campaign, which paradoxically advocated sustainability and increased sales. 
    Outdoor companies like Patagonia may push for sustainability, but they largely still present a mostly white, wealthy experience with nature, which can be off-putting for people of color. “You know if you can't see yourself in those spaces then it’s hard to feel invited or welcome in that movement,” says writer and social justice facilitator Amanda Machado.  
    What is the role of corporations in conservation? And how can the outdoor industry help make nature more safe, accessible and welcoming for all?
    For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts 
    Guests:
    Rick Ridgeway, former Vice President of Public Engagement, Patagonia
    Amanda Machado, writer and social justice facilitator
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    • 55 min
    Geoengineering: Who Should Control Our Atmosphere?

    Geoengineering: Who Should Control Our Atmosphere?

    According to the latest IPCC Assessment Report, we’re currently on course for at least 3°C (5.4°F) of warming by 2100 even if all of the voluntary Paris Agreement emissions pledges are fulfilled. Clearly the world needs to do more to reduce emissions. But what if that’s still not enough?
    Solar geoengineering – such as putting sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere to reduce the amount of the sun’s heat from reaching the earth – could be one tool to slow warming temporarily. But it has become so politically fraught that even research into the subject is contentious. Who decides who should control our atmosphere? And what global governance structures should be put in place before any experimentation begins?
    This program is generously underwritten in part by the Laney and Pasha Thornton Foundation.
    For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts
    Guests:
    Janos Pasztor, Executive Director, Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative, former Assistant Secretary General, United Nations 
    Sheila Jasanoff, Professor of science and technology studies, Harvard Kennedy School
    Albert Lin, Professor, University of California Davis School of Law 
    David Keith, Professor of applied physics and public policy, Harvard
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    • 56 min
    Electrify Everything

    Electrify Everything

    Fully electrifying our homes, cars and industries could cut the amount of total energy we need by half, says Saul Griffith, an entrepreneur, inventor and author of Electrify: An Optimist’s Playbook for Our Clean Energy Future. This electric revolution would mean significantly scaling up our solar, wind and battery storage and reorienting the electric grid – but could also mean “thousands of dollars in savings in every household, every year.” 
    President Biden wants half the cars sold in the US to be electric by 2030. And automakers are increasingly putting money and marketing muscle behind EVs. When Ford announced its all-electric F-150, it sent a powerful jolt through the transportation industry. Pre-orders for the F-150 Lightning surpassed 100,000 within three days, signalling that EVs are no longer just for kale-eating coastal elites. 
    Note: Ford Motor Co. is among Climate One’s sponsors. This program was underwritten in part by ClimateWorks Foundation.
    For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts 
    Guests:
    Saul Griffith, author, Electrify: An Optimist Playbook for Our Clean Energy Future
    Cynthia Williams, Global Director, Sustainability, Homologation and Compliance, Ford Motor Co.
    Sara Baldwin, Director of Electrification Policy, Energy Innovation 
    Josh Nassar, Legislative Director, United Auto Workers
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    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
322 Ratings

322 Ratings

Avesnovuelan ,

Really powerful conversations

I love that this podcast goes beyond the raw science of climate change to address the human impact and the way that intersects with things like racism, sexism, poverty and colonialism. I also appreciate that the conversation is not all gloom and doom but also highlights solutions that are achievable. This gives me hope.

AlexanderrMill ,

Balanced and thoughtful

This podcast is very very clear on its goal and its values. The host does not pull punches but does let his guests speak their minds. The conversation never fails to explore the influence of global systemic racism, colonialism, and the unrealized externalities of emitting activities.
Perhaps this is a personal preference, but I always find it a little difficult to understand why they occasionally invite a panel of opposing voices to participate in a single episode. The recent episode that sought to understand how pipelines play into the energy transition was a prime example of this. It seemed a little soft-gloved with regards to the Enbridge spokesperson, and it failed to allot comparable time to the Sierra Club rep. And when you’re doing a sort of “we don’t pick favorites we value many voices” approach, I don’t think a panel will ever be totally appropriate: someone will always take up more space.
Otherwise, a classic climate podcast.

ecvancouver1986 ,

Sportyspice

Give the mic to a woman or person of color. Do not give air time to utilities who actively silence and fail to acknowledge the implications of their actions

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