25 episodes

Thomas Paine said, "The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related, that it is difficult to class them separately." The Colin McEnroe Show endeavors to prove Paine correct, every weekday.

The Colin McEnroe Show WNPR

    • Comedy
    • 4.4 • 111 Ratings

Thomas Paine said, "The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related, that it is difficult to class them separately." The Colin McEnroe Show endeavors to prove Paine correct, every weekday.

    Fixing The Norms That President Trump Has Broken

    Fixing The Norms That President Trump Has Broken

    The Trump presidency has exposed many vulnerabilities in the laws and norms that govern presidential behavior. His brazen disrespect demands action to protect against a future president who might build on Trump's playbook. 

    President Trump has flouted norms against conflicts-of-interest and courting foreign interference, abused his pardon power, threatened nuclear war, used the office to attack political foes, the press, and the judiciary, and refused to concede an election that he lost.

    He's not the first president to abuse presidential power and he's not the only problem. Congress has abdicated too much of the power they once used to better oversee and constrain presidential power. 

    The good news is that we now have an opportunity to codify certain norms most vulnerable to abuse. Do we have the political will?  

    GUEST: 
    Jack Goldsmith is a professor at Harvard Law School, co-founder of Lawfare, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. He served as the head of the Office of Legal Counsel during the George W. Bush Administration. Administration. He’s the co-author, with Bob Bauer, of After Trump: Reconstructing the Presidency (@jacklgoldsmith)

    Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donate

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min
    America Loves Its Heroes

    America Loves Its Heroes

    How we define what it means to be a hero depends a lot on the values shared by the group that's in power at any given time.

    We're seeing it today in the push and pull over the statues of men whose values no longer reflect the values of a changing community. And time tends to wash away the nuance and complexity of heroes that stand as a symbol of a prior generation.

    Yet, America loves its heroes, even if only for a time. But ​we have a way of using the language of "heroism" to sacrifice the very heroes we admire. Many of the essential workers we deemed heroes of the pandemic had to choose between their health and a paycheck. They didn't choose to be heroes. Some didn't want to be. Others were silenced or shamed for speaking out about unsafe conditions.

    This hour, we talk about what it means to be a hero, and we consider some Connecticut heroes you may not know about. ​

    Also, a look at the unlikely hero driven to heroic acts to avoid being labeled a coward.

    GUESTS:
    Dahlia Lithwick - Writes about the courts and the law for Slate and hosts the podcast Amicus
    Chris Walsh - Director of the college of arts and sciences writing program at Boston University and the author of Cowardice: A Brief History
    Walter Woodward - State historian of Connecticut, the author of Creating Connecticut, and the host of the Grating the Nutmeg podcast

    Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

    Colin McEnroe, Jonathan McNicol, and Cat Pastor contributed to this show, which originally aired July 28, 2020.

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    • 50 min
    Mmmm Donuts

    Mmmm Donuts

    Almost everybody has a favorite donut - even if you don't eat a lot of donuts. It's not so much about the donut as it is about how donuts bring people together - to celebrate, to mourn, to share.

    Donuts have been part of cultures around the world for more than a thousand years, first as a festival special-occasion food, later as an everyday treat.  Later still, as a "weapon" in World War I. They're in movies, music, and Twin Peaks.  In the words of Homer Simpson, "Mmmm donuts.

    What's your favorite donut?

    GUESTS: 
    Michael Krondl - Food writer, culinary historian, artist, and the author of many books including The Donut: History, Recipes, and Lore from Boston to Berlin
    Miranda Popkey - Freelance writer whose work appears in numerous publications including The Hairpin, New York Magazine, and The New Yorker
    Collin Sanford - Dentist at Avon Family Dentistry in Avon and the son of Luke Sanford, former owner of Luke’s Donuts in Avon 
    Freda Love Smith - Drummer and founding member of the Blake Babies, lecturer at Northwestern University and the author of her food memoir, Red Velvet Underground

    Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. 

    Colin McEnroe and Jonathan McNicol contributed to this show.

    Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donate

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 48 min
    Mmmm Donuts

    Mmmm Donuts

    Almost everybody has a favorite donut - even if you don't eat a lot of donuts. It's not so much about the donut as it is about how donuts bring people together - to celebrate, to mourn, to share.

    Donuts have been part of cultures around the world for more than a thousand years, first as a festival special-occasion food, later as an everyday treat.  Later still, as a "weapon" in World War I. They're in movies, music, and Twin Peaks.  In the words of Homer Simpson, "Mmmm donuts.

    GUESTS: 
    Michael Krondl - Food writer, culinary historian, artist, and the author of many books including The Donut: History, Recipes, and Lore from Boston to Berlin
    Miranda Popkey - Freelance writer whose work appears in numerous publications including The Hairpin, New York Magazine, and The New Yorker
    Collin Sanford - Dentist at Avon Family Dentistry in Avon and the son of Luke Sanford, former owner of Luke’s Donuts in Avon 
    Freda Love Smith - Drummer and founding member of the Blake Babies, lecturer at Northwestern University and the author of her food memoir, Red Velvet Underground

    Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. 

    Colin McEnroe and Jonathan McNicol contributed to this show.

    Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donate

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 48 min
    Politics, Religion, and Football. (No Peanuts Or Beer)

    Politics, Religion, and Football. (No Peanuts Or Beer)

    We are still living in two different realities. President Trump lost the election but still can't concede or admit it, and a high percentage of Republicans say they doubt the results -  even though courts have found no evidence to support their claims of fraud. 

    Meanwhile, President-Elect Joe Biden is moving forward with his transition - including talking with foreign leaders, choosing Cabinet members, and planning his first 100 days in office. Can Biden unite us?

    On a related note: Pope Francis elevated Archbishop Wilton Gregory to be a cardinal for the archdiocese of Washington. He'll be the first African American cardinal in the history of the Catholic Church. The archdiocese of Washington sits the heart of our government and Cardinal Gregory will work with the incoming Biden administration to advance the social justice causes important to both.  

    Lastly, the virus is wreaking havoc on the NFL. 

    GUESTS: 
    Frank Rich is Writer-at-Large for New York magazine and Executive Producer for the HBO series "Succession." (@frankrichny) 
    Michael Sean Winters is a columnist at National Catholic Reporter and a fellow at the Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity College in Hartford. (@MichaelSWinters)  
    Ken Belson covers the NFL for The New York Times (@el_belson)

    Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter. 

    Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donate

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 48 min
    The Nose Is Ready For Thanksgiving

    The Nose Is Ready For Thanksgiving

    Last week, President Obama twittered a list of "memorable songs" from his administration. The list was, let's just say, not necessarily well received.

    Vaguely relatedly: Incoming secretary of state nominee Antony Blinken… has his own "wonk rock" tunes up on Spotify?

    And: The Liberator is a sort of animated, four-part Netflix miniseries that tells the story of the 157th Infantry in World War II.

    Some other stuff that happened this week, give or take:
    Fred Hills, Editor of Nabokov and Many Others, Dies at 85
    A longtime editor at Simon & Schuster, he brought to market both commercial hits and literary prizewinners and edited more than 50 New York Times best sellers.
    David Maas, Half of 'Quick Change' Magic Act, Dies of COVID-19
    Mr. Maas and his wife, who performed lightning-fast costume changes, often appeared on television and were a halftime fixture at N.B.A. and college basketball arenas.
    Conan O'Brien's Nightly Late-Night Show to End Its Run in 2021
    Here's The Deal, Folks: A POTUS Impression Is Harder Than It Looks
    Baby Yoda Canceled Amid Accusations of Genocide
    Last week's egg-eating episode of The Mandalorian has led to a disturbance in the Force. For real.
    Howard Stern: If Trump starts a TV network, it'll fail within a year
    The Art That Defied the Last Four, Terrible Years
    My mind has slipped anxiously off books and movies since 2016. But as the credits roll on 2020, I'm ready to look back.
    George Clooney When We Need Him Most
    The actor, director, and GQ Icon of the Year is the one thing we can all agree on -- at a time when we can’t agree on anything.
    Jason Isaacs: 'I'd like to apologise to anyone who met me before I was 30 -- I was a drug addict'
    David Fincher's Impossible Eye
    With 'Mank,' America's most famously exacting director tackles the movie he's been waiting his entire career to make.
    98 Million TikTok Followers Can't Be Wrong
    How a 16-year-old from suburban Connecticut became the most famous teen in America
    Helicopter pilot finds 'strange' monolith in remote part of Utah
    State employee spotted mysterious metal structure amid red rocks while counting bighorn sheep
    John Boyega Had A "Transparent, Honest" Phone Call With Kathleen Kennedy After 'Star Wars' Race Comments
    Columbus-Free Wooster Square Takes Shape
    Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Dua Lipa Dominate 2021 Grammy Nominations
    The major categories include some surprising, lesser-known names and notable absences as a Recording Academy in transition plans its pandemic awards show.
    'Chappelle's Show' Removed From Netflix at Dave Chappelle's Request
    The 25 Greatest Actors of the 21st Century (So Far)
    Chameleons or beauties, star turns or character roles -- these are the performers who have outshone all others on the big screen in the last 20 years.

    GUESTS:
    Lucy Gellman - Editor of The Arts Paper and host of WNHH radio's Kitchen Sync
    Rich Hollant - Principal at CO:LAB, founder of Free Center, and commissioner on cultural affairs for the city of Hartford

    Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

    Colin McEnroe and Cat Pastor contributed to this show.

    Support the show: http://www.wnpr.org/donate

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
111 Ratings

111 Ratings

jennaypeaz ,

A Gem of Our Time

Colin was the first man to introduce my interest into talk radio. His topics are almost always great and the show is interesting, and his cadence is superb. Love it. Thank you Colin for feeding my brain when it was starving for new content:)

rzz88 ,

The Colin McEnroe Show

I love NPR and its shows but what a big disappointment I just hd when I called in to NPRfor the fund raising drive. First the NPR person had no idea who Colin McEnroe was, couldn’t find his show and Vendome her supervisorhad no idea what I was talking about: pledging $10/month -$120 for year to receive NPR ear buds. The Colin McEnroe show offered them. I wasted and my good mood! NPR never figured out Colin’s Show or the ear buds (today only). What a waste. I normally donate to WNYC, however I prefer NPR - ok NPR doesn’t want my donation; shame on WNPR for not knowing of The Colin McEnroe Show and gift!!!!! I called 8:55PM Monday 10/7

pseudonym58 ,

Varied Discussions with Considerable Depth

I do not have time to devote 50 minutes or so to listening to conversation in the mornings when this show is broadcast on Connecticut Public Radio, so I am very glad that it is available in podcast form. No breathless hyperbole here, just Colin, his guests and their generally well-considered opinions, and a few callers of a similar ilk. Topics can range from recent news and politics to entertainment, literature and science. Highly recommended.

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