100 episodes

An upbeat, entertaining look at the latest advances in science and engineering. Often fun and always fascinating, each episode covers a project funded by NSF -- federally sponsored research, brought to you by you!

The Discovery Files National Science Foundation

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 7 Ratings

An upbeat, entertaining look at the latest advances in science and engineering. Often fun and always fascinating, each episode covers a project funded by NSF -- federally sponsored research, brought to you by you!

    • video
    Mimicking locusts could improve collision avoidance

    Mimicking locusts could improve collision avoidance

    Can a new collision detector for vehicles successfully mimic an avoidance neuron in locusts that allows the insects to fly in swarms without slamming into each other?

    • 1 min
    • video
    What can a sponge teach us about engineering?

    What can a sponge teach us about engineering?

    The glassy skeletons of marine sponges are inspring the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft. With funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, engineers at Harvard have found a tiny sea sponge shows a pattern of strength and stability unmatched by humans.

    • 1 min
    • video
    CHEESOLOGY

    CHEESOLOGY

    Turns out those distinctly funky smells from cheese are one way fungi communicate with bacteria, and what they're saying has a lot to do with the delicious variety of flavors that cheese has to offer. The discovery was made by researchers at Tufts University, with support from the National Science Foundation. The findings could have implications for agriculture and medicine, too.

    • 1 min
    • video
    Chronic jet lag impairs immune response, accelerates tumor growth

    Chronic jet lag impairs immune response, accelerates tumor growth

    A new study sheds light on how circadian disruptions impact the body's ability to curb cancer growth. The research was performed by scientists at Virginia Tech and the National University of Quilmes in Argentina. It was supported by the National Science Foundation in the United States and the National Science Agency in Argentina.

    • 1 min
    • video
    A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate

    A wearable sensor to help ALS patients communicate

    Researchers have designed a skin-like device that can measure small facial movements in patients who have lost the ability to speak. Using this approach, patients could communicate a variety of sentiments using small movements that are analyzed by a handheld processing unit. The work was led by researchers at MIT's Conformable Decoders group, with support from the U.S. National Science Foundation.

    • 1 min
    • video
    Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians

    Earliest example of a rapid-fire tongue found in 'weird and wonderful' extinct amphibians

    Fossils of bizarre, armored amphibians known as albanerpetontids provide the oldest evidence of a slingshot-style tongue. The study was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and was carried out by researchers at Sam Houston University, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Texas a Austin, and several institutions in other nations.

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

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