102 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Science Magazine Podcast Science Magazine

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 653 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    Saying farewell to Insight, connecting the microbiome and the brain, and a book on agriculture in Africa

    Saying farewell to Insight, connecting the microbiome and the brain, and a book on agriculture in Africa

    What we learned from a seismometer on Mars, why it’s so difficult to understand the relationship between our microbes and our brains, and the first in our series of books on the science of food and agriculture

    First up this week, freelance space journalist Jonathan O’Callaghan  joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the retirement of NASA’s Mars InSight lander. After almost 4 years of measuring quakes on the surface of the Red Planet, the  lander’s solar panels are getting too dusty to continue providing power. O'Callaghan  and Crespi look back at the insights  that InSight has given us about Mars’s interior, and they talk about where else in the Solar System it might make sense to place a seismometer.

    Also this week, we have a special issue on the body’s microbiome beyond the gut. As part of the special issue, John Cryan, principal investigator at APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, wrote a commentary piece  on tightening the connections research has made between microbes and the brain—the steps needed to go from seeing connections to understanding how the microbiome might be tweaked to change what’s happening in the brain.

    Finally this week, we have the first installment of our series of author interviews  on the science of food and agriculture. In this inaugural segment, host and science journalist Angela Saini talks to Ousmane Badiane, an expert on agricultural policy and development in Africa, and a co-author of Food For All In Africa: Sustainable Intensification for African Farmers, a 2019 book looking at the possibilities and reality of sustainable intensive farming in Africa.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Illustration: Hannah Agosta; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: overlapping drawings of microbial populations]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Jonathan O’Callaghan; Angela Saini

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.10.1126/science.add1406

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 37 min
    Seeing the Milky Way’s central black hole, and calling dolphins by their names

    Seeing the Milky Way’s central black hole, and calling dolphins by their names

    On this week’s show: The shadow of Milky Way’s giant black hole has been seen for the first time, and bottlenose dolphins recognize each other by signature whistles—and tastes 

    It’s been a few years since the first image of a black hole was published—that of the supermassive black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy came about in 2019. Now, we have a similar image of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way—our very own galaxy. Staff Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss why these images look so much alike, even though M87’s black hole is 1600 times larger than ours. We also discuss what’s next for the telescope that captured these shots.

    Also this week, we take to the seas. Bottlenose dolphins are known to have a “signature whistle” they use to announce their identity to other dolphins. This week in Science Advances, Jason Bruck and colleagues write about how they may also recognize other dolphins through another sense: taste. Jason, an assistant professor in the department of biology at Stephen F. Austin State University, talks with Sarah about what this means for dolphin minds.

    In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor, interviews Gary Michelson, founder and co-chair of Michelson Philanthropies, about the importance of supporting research in the field of immunology—and where that support should be directed. This segment is sponsored by Michelson Philanthropies.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: Dolphin Quest ; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: bottlenose dolphin peeking its head out of the water with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add0515

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 41 min
    Fixing fat bubbles for vaccines, and preventing pain from turning chronic

    Fixing fat bubbles for vaccines, and preventing pain from turning chronic

    On this week’s show: Lipid nanoparticles served us well as tiny taxis delivering millions of mRNA vaccines against COVID-19, but they aren’t optimized—yet, and why we might need inflammation to stop chronic pain

    The messenger RNA payload of the mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 is wrapped up in little fatty packets called lipid nanoparticles (LNPs). These fat bubbles were originally designed for something much different—carrying molecules into cells to silence genes. But they were useful and we were in a hurry, so not much was changed about them when they were pressed into service against COVID-19. Science journalist Elie Dolgin talks with host Sarah Crespi about ongoing efforts to improve LNPs as a delivery system for mRNA vaccines and therapeutic treatments.

    Next on the show, we hear about “pain chronification.” Have you ever thought about chronic pain? What happens in the body when it heals—no specific thing is broken—but the pain never subsides? Sarah chats with Luda Diatchenko, professor on the faculties of medicine and dentistry at McGill University, about her Science Translational Medicine paper on the need for inflammation to prevent pain chronification. 

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: V. Altounian/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: lipid nanoparticle illustration with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Elie Dolgin

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.adc9455

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 27 min
    Staking out the start of the Anthropocene, and why sunscreen is bad for coral

    Staking out the start of the Anthropocene, and why sunscreen is bad for coral

    On this week’s show: Geoscientists eye contenders for where to mark the beginning of the human-dominated geological epoch, and how sunscreen turns into photo toxin

    We live in the Anthropocene: an era on our planet that is dominated by human activity to such an extent that the evidence is omnipresent in the soil, air, and even water. But how do we mark the start? Science Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about how geoscientists are choosing the one place on Earth that best shows the advent of the Anthropocene, the so-called “golden spike.”

     

    Also this week, Djordje Vuckovic, a Ph.D. candidate in the department of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University, joins Sarah to talk about how sunscreen threatens coral reefs. Reefs are under a lot of stress these days, from things like warming waters, habitat destruction, and the loss of their fishy friends to voracious fishermen. Another suspected stressor is chemical sunscreens, which drift off swimming tourists. It turns out that common chemicals in sunscreen that protect skin from the Sun are modified by sea anemones and corals into a photo toxin that damages them when exposed to the Sun’s rays.

     

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

     

    [Image: Amanda Tinoco; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

     

    [alt: photo of healthy corals at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia with podcast symbol overlay]

     

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Paul Voosen

     

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    • 21 min
    Using quantum tools to track dark matter, why rabies remains, and a book series on science and food

    Using quantum tools to track dark matter, why rabies remains, and a book series on science and food

    On this week’s show: How physicists are using quantum sensors to suss out dark matter, how rabies thwarts canine vaccination campaigns, and a kickoff for our new series with authors of books on food, land management, and nutrition science

    Dark matter hunters have turned to quantum sensors to find elusive subatomic particles that may exist outside physicists’ standard model. Adrian Cho, a staff writer for Science, joins host Sarah Crespi to give a tour of the latest dark matter particle candidates—and the traps that physicists are setting for them.

    Next, we hear from Katie Hampson, a professor in the Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health & Comparative Medicine at the University of Glasgow, about her work contact tracing rabies in Tanzania. Her group was able to track rabies in a population of 50,000 dogs over 14 years. The massive study gives new insight into how to stop a virus that circulates at superlow levels but keeps popping up, despite vaccine campaigns.

    Finally, we launch our 2022 books series on food and agriculture. In six interviews, which will be released monthly for the rest of the year, host and science journalist Angela Saini will speak to authors of recent books on topics from Indigenous land management to foods that are going extinct. This month, Angela talks with Lenore Newman, director of the Food and Agriculture Institute at the University of the Fraser Valley, who helped select the books for the series.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: Suzanne McNabb; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: Dogs in Tanzania with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Angela Saini, Adrian Cho

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/content/podcast/using-quantum-tools-track-dark-matter-why-rabies-remains-and-book-series-science-and

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 42 min
    Protecting birds from brightly lit buildings, and controlling robots from orbit

    Protecting birds from brightly lit buildings, and controlling robots from orbit

    On this week’s show: Saving birds from city lights, and helping astronauts inhabit robots

    First up, Science Contributing Correspondent Josh Sokol talks with host Sarah Crespi about the millions of migrating birds killed every year when they slam into buildings—attracted by brightly lit windows. New efforts are underway to predict bird migrations and dim lights along their path, using a bird-forecasting system called .

    Next, we hear from Aaron Pereira, a researcher at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and a guest researcher at the human robot interaction lab at the European Space Agency. He chats with Sarah about his Science Robotics paper on controlling a robot on Earth from the International Space Station and the best way for an astronaut to “immerse” themselves in a rover or make themselves feel like it is an extension of their body. 

    In a sponsored segment from Science and the AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for custom publishing, interviews Alberto Pugliese, professor of medicine, microbiology, and immunology at the University of Miami, about a program he leads to advance research into type 1 diabetes. This segment is sponsored by the Helmsley Charitable Trust and nPod (the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes).

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: M. Panzirsch et al., Science Robotics (2022); Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: remote-controlled rover with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Josh Sokol

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abq5907

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
653 Ratings

653 Ratings

Babydust1974 ,

Won’t let me listen to episodes.

Hello! I love your podcast and I always like to listen to them from oldest to newest. For some reason it won’t let me listen to the next episode I am on which is from 2014 about down syndrome. Can you please fix it so I can continue to listen to your podcast?
Can you please fix your podcast so I can listen to the rest of 2014 episodes and then move on to 2015? Please?

etherdog ,

Thalidomide

The problem with thalidomide is that there are two forms, left and right chirality and one form is fine and therapeutic and the other is mutagenic. When mass production began there was little understanding of the difference. Not describing this difference when discussing this drug is irresponsible.

B_squared ,

Nonfunctional Links in Most Recent Episode

Just a heads up! Love the pod

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