537 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Science Magazine Podcast Science Magazine

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 728 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    How the immune system can cause psychosis, and tool use in otters

    How the immune system can cause psychosis, and tool use in otters

    On this week’s show: What happens when the body’s own immune system attacks the brain, and how otters’ use of tools expands their diet
     
    First on the show this week, when rogue antibodies attack the brain, patients can show bizarre symptoms—from extreme thirst, to sleep deprivation, to outright psychosis. Contributing Correspondent Richard Stone joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the hunt for biomarkers and treatments for this cluster of autoimmune disorders that were once mistaken for schizophrenia or even demonic possession.
     
    Next on this episode, producer Katherine Irving talks with Chris Law, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Washington and the University of Texas at Austin, about how sea otters gain energy benefits (and dental benefits) when they use tools to tackle tougher prey such as snails or large clams.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Richard Stone; Katherine Irving

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.z4pdg62
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    • 32 min
    A very volcanic moon, and better protections for human study subjects

    A very volcanic moon, and better protections for human study subjects

    Jupiter’s moon Io has likely been volcanically active since the start of the Solar System, and a proposal to safeguard healthy human subjects in clinical trials

    First on the show this week, a look at proposed protections for healthy human subjects, particularly in phase 1 clinical trials. Deputy News Editor Martin Enserink joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the risks healthy participants face when involved in early testing of drugs for safety and tolerance. Then, we hear about a project to establish a set of global standards initiated by the Ethics Committee of France’s national biomedical research agency, INSERM.
     
    Next on this episode, a peek at the history of the most volcanically active body in the Solar System, Jupiter’s moon Io. Because the surface of Io is constantly being remodeled by its many volcanoes, it’s difficult to study its past by looking at craters or other landmarks. Katherine de Kleer, assistant professor of planetary science and astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, talks about using isotopic ratios in the moon’s atmosphere to estimate how long it’s been spewing matter into space.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Martin Enserink
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zyq2ig8
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    • 29 min
    Improving earthquake risk maps, and the world’s oldest ice

    Improving earthquake risk maps, and the world’s oldest ice

    Bringing historical seismic reports and modern seismic risk maps into alignment, and a roundup of stories from our newsletter, ScienceAdviser
     
    First on the show this week, a roundup of stories with our newsletter editor, Christie Wilcox. Wilcox talks with host Sarah Crespi about the oldest ice ever found, how well conservation efforts seem to be working, and repelling mosquitoes with our skin microbes.
     
    Next on this episode, evaluating seismic hazard maps. In a Science Advances paper this week, Leah Salditch, a geoscience peril adviser at risk and reinsurance company Guy Carpenter, compared modern seismic risk map predictions with descriptions of past quakes. The analysis found a mismatch: Reported shaking in the past tended to be stronger than modern models would have predicted. She talks with Crespi about where this bias comes from and how to fix it.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Christie Wilcox
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zfj31xo
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    • 24 min
    The science of loneliness, making one of organic chemistry’s oldest reactions safer, and a new book series

    The science of loneliness, making one of organic chemistry’s oldest reactions safer, and a new book series

    Researchers try to identify effective loneliness interventions, making the Sandmeyer safer, and books that look to the future and don’t see doom and gloom
     
    First up on the show, Deputy News Editor Kelly Servick explores the science of loneliness. Is loneliness on the rise or just our awareness of it? How do we deal with the stigma of being lonely?
     
    Also appearing in this segment:
    ●     Laura Coll-Planas
    ●     Julianne Holt-Lunstad
    ●     Samia Akhter-Khan
     
    Next, producer Ariana Remmel talks with Tim Schulte, a graduate student at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research and RWTH Aachen University, about making one of organic chemistry’s oldest reactions—the Sandmeyer reaction—both safer and more versatile.
     
    Finally, we kick off this year’s book series with books editor Valerie Thompson and books host Angela Saini. They discuss this year’s theme: a future to look forward to.
     
    Book segments come out the last episode of the month. Books in the series:
    ●     Eve: The Disobedient Future of Birth by Claire Horn (May)
    ●     Tokens: The Future of Money in the Age of the Platform by Rachel O’Dwyer (June)
    ●     The Heart and the Chip: Our Bright Future with Robots by Daniela Rus and Gregory Mone (July)
    ●     Climate Capitalism: Winning the Race to Zero Emissions and Solving the Crisis of Our Age by Akshat Rathi (August)
    ●     Virtual You: How Building Your Digital Twin Will Revolutionize Medicine and Change Your Life by Peter Coveney and Roger Highfield (September)
    ●     Imagination: A Manifesto by Ruha Benjamin (October)
     
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kelly Servick; Ariana Remmel; Valerie Thompson; Angela Saini
    LINKS FOR MP3 META
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zqubta7
     
    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast
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    • 42 min
    Ritual murders in the neolithic, why 2023 was so hot, and virus and bacteria battle in the gut

    Ritual murders in the neolithic, why 2023 was so hot, and virus and bacteria battle in the gut

    A different source of global warming, signs of a continentwide tradition of human sacrifice, and a virus that attacks the cholera bacteria
     
    First up on the show this week, clearer skies might be accelerating global warming. Staff Writer Paul Voosen joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how as air pollution is cleaned up, climate models need to consider the decrease in the planet’s reflectivity. Less reflectivity means Earth is absorbing more energy from the Sun and increased temps.
     
    Also from the news team this week, we hear about how bones from across Europe suggest recurring Stone Age ritual killings. Contributing Correspondent Andrew Curry talks about how a method of murder used by the Italian Mafia today may have been used in sacrifices by early farmers, from Poland to the Iberian Peninsula.
     
    Finally, Eric Nelson, an associate professor at the University of Florida’s Emerging Pathogens Institute, joins Sarah to talk about an infectious bacteria that’s fighting on two fronts. The bacterium that causes cholera—Vibrio cholerae—can be killed off with antibiotics but at the same time, it is hunted by a phage virus living inside the human gut. In a paper published in Science, Nelson and colleagues describe how we should think about phage as predator and bacteria as prey, in the savanna of our intestines. The ratio of predator to prey turns out to be important for the course of cholera infections.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Paul Voosen; Andrew Curry
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zhgw74e
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    • 38 min
    Trialing treatments for Long Covid, and a new organelle appears on the scene

    Trialing treatments for Long Covid, and a new organelle appears on the scene

    ]Researchers are testing HIV drugs and monoclonal antibodies against long-lasting COVID-19, and what it takes to turn a symbiotic friend into an organelle
     
    First up on the show this week, clinical trials of new and old treatments for Long Covid. Producer Meagan Cantwell is joined by Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel and some of her sources to discuss the difficulties of studying and treating this debilitating disease.
     
    People in this segment:
    ·      Michael Peluso
    ·      Sara Cherry
    ·      Shelley Hayden
     
    Next: Move over mitochondria, a new organelle called the nitroplast is here. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Tyler Coale, a postdoctoral scholar in the University of California, Santa Cruz’s Ocean Sciences Department, about what exactly makes an organelle an organelle and why it would be nice to have inhouse nitrogen fixing in your cells.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zof5fvk
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    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

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ASPD1 ,

More time!

Thanks for the show all!
I love having a science news podcast to learn about stuff I hadn’t really thought about
I wish more time was spent on the interviews-they are great topics! For example the latest episode about the cartels, I’d rather have 11 more minutes (or more!) of that interview than to hear about new fall games… seems like conflicting shows to me.

Manny Camps ,

NPR style narration but way more boring

I listen to quite a few science podcasts and this one is by far the most boring one. The presentation of each topic is boring. I want more authentic narration, not the ridiculously animated NPR-Planet Money style of narration

eb ramírez ,

Informative

So easy to follow, awesome topics

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