383 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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    • Science
    • 4.3 • 605 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    Cutting shipping air pollution may cause water pollution, and keeping air clean with lightning

    Cutting shipping air pollution may cause water pollution, and keeping air clean with lightning

    News Staff Writer Erik Stokstad joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss possible harms from how the shipping industry is responding to air pollution regulations—instead of pumping health-harming chemicals into the air, they are now being dumped into oceans.

    Also this week, William Brune, professor of meteorology and atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, talks about flying a plane into thunderstorms and how measurements from research flights revealed the surprising amount of air-cleaning oxidants created by lightning.

    In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders interviews Manfred Kraus, senior director and head of in vivo pharmacology oncology at Bristol Myers Squibb, about the impact of humanized mice on preclinical research. This segment is sponsored by the Jackson Laboratory.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    • 32 min
    Chernobyl’s ruins grow restless, and entangling macroscopic objects

    Chernobyl’s ruins grow restless, and entangling macroscopic objects

    Rich Stone, former international news editor at Science and current senior science editor at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Tangled Bank Studios, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about concerning levels of fission reactions deep in an inaccessible area of the site of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster. Though nothing is likely to come of it anytime soon, scientists must decide what—if anything—they should do tamp down reactions in this hard-to-reach place.

    Also on this week’s show, Shlomi Kotler, an assistant professor in the department of applied physics at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, joins Sarah to discuss the quantum entanglement of macroscopic objects. This hallmark of quantum physics has been confined—up until now—to microscopic items like atoms, ions, and photons. But what does it mean that two drums, each the width of a human hair, can be entangled?

    Read a related insight.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 27 min
    Storing wind as gravity, and well-digging donkeys

    Storing wind as gravity, and well-digging donkeys

    Contributing Correspondent Cathleen O’Grady joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about a company that stores renewable energy by hoisting large objects in massive “gravity batteries.”

    Also on this week’s show, Erick Lundgren, a postdoctoral researcher at Aarhus University, talks about how water from wells dug by wild horses and feral donkeys provides a buffer to all different kinds of animals and plants during the driest times in the Sonora and Mojave deserts.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    • 19 min
    Rebuilding Louisiana’s coast, and recycling plastic into fuel

    Rebuilding Louisiana’s coast, and recycling plastic into fuel

    Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Warren Cornwall about a restoration project to add 54 square kilometers back to the coast of Louisiana by allowing the Mississippi River to resume delivering sediment to sinking regions.

    Also on this week’s show, Dion Vlachos, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the University of Delaware, Newark, and director of the Delaware Energy Institute, joins Sarah to talk about his Science Advances paper on a low-temperature process to convert different kinds of plastic to fuels, like gasoline and jet fuel.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    • 25 min
    Why muon magnetism matters, and a count of all the Tyrannosaurus rex that ever lived

    Why muon magnetism matters, and a count of all the Tyrannosaurus rex that ever lived

    Host Sarah Crespi talks with Staff Writer Adrian Cho about a new measurement of the magnetism of the muon—an unstable cousin of the electron. This latest measurement and an earlier one both differ from predictions based on the standard model of particle physics. The increased certainty that there is a muon magnetism mismatch could be a field day for theoretical physicists looking to add new particles or forces to the standard model.

    Also on this week’s show, Charles Marshall, director of the University of California Museum of Paleontology and professor of integrative biology, joins Sarah to talk about his team’s calculation for the total number of Tyrannosaurus rex that ever lived.

    In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders interviews Imre Berger, professor of biochemistry at the University of Bristol, about his Science paper on finding a druggable pocket on the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 and how the work was accelerated by intensive cloud computing. This segment is sponsored by Oracle for Research.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    • 37 min
    Magnetar mysteries, and when humans got big brains

    Magnetar mysteries, and when humans got big brains

    Host Sarah Crespi talks with Contributing Correspondent Joshua Sokol about magnetars—highly magnetized neutron stars. A recent intense outburst of gamma rays from a nearby galaxy has given astronomers a whole new view on these mysterious magnetic monsters.

    Also on this week’s show, Christoph Zollikofer, a professor of anthropology at the University of Zurich, talks about the evolution of humanlike brains. His team’s work with brain-case fossils suggests the complex brains we carry around today were not present in the early hominins to leave Africa, but later developed in the cousins they left behind.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
605 Ratings

605 Ratings

Babydust1974 ,

Won’t let me listen to episodes.

Hello! I love your podcast and I always like to listen to them from oldest to newest. For some reason it won’t let me listen to the next episode I am on which is from 2014 about down syndrome. Can you please fix it so I can continue to listen to your podcast?
Can you please fix your podcast so I can listen to the rest of 2014 episodes and then move on to 2015? Please?

M Dodge ,

Sarah Crespi Superstar

Sarah Crespi is one of my favorite interviewers and science communicators. She’s beyond amazing. When she interviews researchers, her questions are well-crafted and insightful, and she asks terrific follow-up questions. Any time I feel a little confused by an interviewee’s explanation, she asks exactly the right question to clarify things. All of my respect and admiration to such a skilled science communicator!

hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose ,

Love Sarah Crespi

In a toxic ocean of vocal fry and uptalk Sarah Crespi is a beautiful tropical island to save us all. It is so refreshing to listen to a science podcast that isn’t singularly focused on COVID-19 and climate change.
Sarahs interviews are weaved flawlessly with insightful questions and innocent humor. She is supremely intelligent and confident during the interview. The shows are expertly edited and the sound quality is excellent.

If my daughter displays an interest in journalism or any professional audio career I will play this podcast for her and say “this is how to do it”

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