300 episodes

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.


For complete access to the original papers featured in the Nature Podcast, subscribe to Nature.

Nature Podcast Nature

    • Science
    • 4.6, 528 Ratings

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.


For complete access to the original papers featured in the Nature Podcast, subscribe to Nature.

    The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde

    The chemical that turns locusts from Jekyll into Hyde

    Triggering swarming behaviour in locusts, and new insights into how humans synchronize.
     
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    • 31 min
    Audio long-read: Pluto’s dark side is overflowing with secrets

    Audio long-read: Pluto’s dark side is overflowing with secrets

    This is an audio version of our feature: Pluto’s dark side spills its secrets — including hints of a hidden ocean
     
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    • 18 min
    Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it

    Why skin grows bigger as you stretch it

    Skin's unusual response to stretching is finally explained, and the latest in a huge effort to map DNA.


    In this episode:


    01:06 Stretching skin
    For decades it’s been known that stretching skin causes more skin to grow, but the reasons why have been a mystery. Now, researchers have uncovered a mechanism to explain the phenomenon. Research Article: Aragona et al.; News and Views: Stretch exercises for stem cells expand the skin


    07:49 Coronapod
    We discuss how the coronavirus pandemic has affected scientific meetings and how the learned societies that organise them are adapting. How scientific conferences will survive the coronavirus shock; How scientific societies are weathering the pandemic’s financial storm; 
    A year without conferences? How the coronavirus pandemic could change research


    18:18 Research Highlights
    A genetic trait for pain-resistance, and the accessibility-aware ancient Greeks. Research Highlight: A gene helps women in labour to skip the painkillers; Research Highlight: This temple was equipped with accessibility ramps more than 2,000 years ago


    20:42 ENCODE updates
    The ENCODE project aims to identify all the regions in the human genome involved in gene regulation. This week, data from its third iteration has been published and we examine the highlights. Research Article: Snyder; News and Views: Expanded ENCODE delivers invaluable genomic encyclopaedia


    28:50 Briefing Chat
    We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we look at how smallpox may be much older than previously thought, and how the Earth’s atmosphere rings like a bell. Nature News: Smallpox and other viruses plagued humans much earlier than suspected; Physics World: Earth’s atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers


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    • 33 min
    When did people arrive in the Americas? New evidence stokes debate

    When did people arrive in the Americas? New evidence stokes debate

    New evidence may push back the date on human arrival to the Americas, and an examination of science’s flaws.


    In this episode:


    00:59 Ancient Americans
    Two papers suggest that humans were present in the Americas thousands of years before many people have thought. We examine the evidence. Research Article: Ardelean et al.; Research Article: Becerra-Valdivia and Higham; News and Views: Evidence grows that peopling of the Americas began more than 20,000 years ago


    10:44 Coronapod
    We discuss the latest results from vaccine trials around the world, and controversy in the US as COVID-19 data collection moves out of the CDC. News: Coronavirus vaccines leap through safety trials — but which will work is anybody’s guess


    24:38 Research Highlights
    How being green makes things easy for some frogs, and how waves will be affected by climate change. Research Highlight: How frogs became green — again, and again, and again; Research Highlight: Extreme Arctic waves set to hit new heights


    27:11 How can science improve?
    A new book highlights some of the flaws of how science is done. We caught up with the author to find out his thoughts on how science can be cleaned up. Books and Arts: Fraud, bias, negligence and hype in the lab — a rogues’ gallery


    35:54 Briefing Chat
    We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss a puzzling new insight into the expansion of the Universe, and an update to Plan S that will allow open-access research to be published in any journal. Nature News: Mystery over Universe’s expansion deepens with fresh data; Nature News: Open-access Plan S to allow publishing in any journal


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    • 42 min
    Graphene’s magic angle reveals a new twist

    Graphene’s magic angle reveals a new twist

    Probing the superconducting properties of graphene and bacteria that can use manganese to grow.


    01:15 Magic angle graphene
    If you sandwich two sheets of graphene together and twist one in just the right way, it can gain some superconducting properties. Now, physicists have added another material to this sandwich which stabilises that superconductivity, a result that may complicate physicists’ understanding of magic angles. Research Article: Arora et al.


    08:22 Coronapod
    With evidence mounting that SARS-CoV2 can spread in tiny aersolised droplets, researchers have called on the WHO to change their guidance for disease prevention. News: Mounting evidence suggests coronavirus is airborne — but health advice has not caught up; Research article: Morwaska et al.; WHO: Transmission of SARS-CoV-2: implications for infection prevention precautions


    19:27 Research Highlights
    Repairing human lungs by hooking them up to pigs, and a new form of carbon. Research Highlight: How to use a live pig to revitalize a human lung; Research Highlight: This material is almost as hard as diamond — but as light as graphite


    21:46 Manganese munchers
    For decades it’s been thought that microbes that use manganese as an energy source must exist. Now, for the first time, researchers have found evidence that they do. Research Article: Yu and Leadbetter


    29:12 Briefing Chat
    We take a look at some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time we discuss DNA evidence of contact between ancient Native Americans and Polynesians, reintroduction of bison to the UK, and the first extinction of a modern marine fish. Nature News: Ancient voyage carried Native Americans’ DNA to remote Pacific islands; The Guardian: Wild bison to return to UK for first time in 6,000 years; Scientific American: Smooth Handfish Extinction Marks a Sad Milestone


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    • 37 min
    Coronapod: Massive coronavirus outbreak strikes iconic Californian prison after it rejected expert aid

    Coronapod: Massive coronavirus outbreak strikes iconic Californian prison after it rejected expert aid

    In this episode:


    01:47 Disaster in San Quentin
    San Quentin prison is facing a massive outbreak, we dig into how they got there. The crisis has arisen despite warnings from experts, and offers of free tests, which were declined. We ask why? And what can be done now?
    News: California's San Quentin prison declined free coronavirus tests and urgent advice — now it has a massive outbreak


    29:51 One good thing
    For the last episode of Coronapod, our hosts pick out ways that the pandemic has changed them for the better, including professional flexibility, a renewed focus on the power of reporting and time with family


    36:07 Lockdown and children's health
    Reporter Stewart asks if lockdowns could have any lasting impact on her young children - what evidence is there on the effect of isolation on young minds?
    Survey: Co-Space Study: Supporting Parents, Adolescents and Children during Epidemics
     
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    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
528 Ratings

528 Ratings

Celeq ,

So valuable

It is truly a breath of fresh air. No BS, just clear, well crafted information on very interesting topics. Sometimes a little over my head, but it is a great stretch. Thanks

J-🐱 ,

Nature rules

Nature is my favorite! This podcast is much needed for science lovers and the sci-curious, who might not seek out the research journals themselves, alike :)

einstein ornii tegshitgel ,

So interesting and informative

Please keep going. Much needed interesting podcast.

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