21 min

The Ethics of Black Friday Celtfather Unkilted

    • Personal Journals

Greetings Gunn Runner
Is Black Friday an ethical holiday? Overcoming fear is the theme of a new song inspired by the hobbit. Top 10 songs on Spotify.
It's all on my monthly update, Celtfather Unkilted, show #287.
The podcast is brought to you by my amazing Patrons in the Gunn Runners Club on Patreon. I have some new subscribers, and I hope to make this an even more important part of my general promotion in the weeks ahead.
0:42 - SHOWS PLANNED FOR THE COMING MONTH
DEC 1: Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 5: Grant Park Farmer's Market @ 9 AM - Noon
DEC 8: Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 15: Season 9 Finale Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 16: Celtfather Live @ 7 PM EST
1:14 - MUSINGS: The Ethics of Black Friday
I'm pretty confident that you know all about Black Friday. Now, we also have Cyber Monday. These are two days when people open up their wallets and many businesses offer HUGE discounts.
I confess I am very torn by those holidays. On the one hand, I have my own business. CD sales are still one of the big ways I make money. My Patreon needs to be twice what it is for me to remove my dependence on CD and merch sales.
On the other hand is consumerism. We create so much waste. I'm not even gonna go into what that waste does to our environment and its effect on climate change.
One of the things I love about the new digital revolution is I can potentially create music and make a living without adding to the waste. One day I hope to sell out all my CDs. Then I will just release them on a limited basis, for those who truly love the media. My storage shelves will be mostly empty.
The Christmas holiday doesn't help. It's all about spending. It bothered me a lot more back in the 90s when I first heard about Buy Nothing Day.
That day was created in response to the consumerism. It's on the very same day as Black Friday. "Don't buy" is the message.
Back around 2001, it became possible to accept credit cards at gigs. But at the time, I was $15K in debt. All because of MY irresponsible use of credit cards.
It got me questioning. Should I accept credit card payments...and potentially have you, my customer, go into debt because of my products?
Eventually, I decided you should be responsible for yourself. But at the same time is that cop out?
This is one of those ethical dilemmas.
I was talking recently with people about ethics in healthcare. The question was raised: should a parent have full control of their child's healthcare? Do they know what's best for their child?
The quick answer is yes. I know what's best for my daughters.
But that comes from my privileged, fairly healthy family background. A parent who is strung out on drugs, sick, or poor or in abusive relationship. They might not be healthy enough to do what is best for their child.
There are so many nuances. There isn't one right answer. It's each different for each person.
My biggest complaint with corporations is that in order to be successful, they need to do what will make the most-profit for their business. That sounds reasonable. They should be allowed to make money freely, without government interference.
That is until you realize that they can dump sewage into our water, poison our air, and destroy our environment. They can murder people and not be culpable.
Because they are a business. The actions of the business will not financially impact the owners of that business.
Reminds of McDonalds: "Would you like to Supersize that?"
That phrase made them boatloads of money. The cost was the increased obesity of their customers.
It took regulations to stop them from using that simple sales phrase. Sure it made them more money. But was it ethical?
We are all manipulated by businesses trying to make a buck. That's why Black Friday changed from businesses saying, "Huh. We get a lot more sales on the day after Thanksgiving" to "Let's capitalize on that and start a holiday!"
I decided not to do a Black Friday sale th

Greetings Gunn Runner
Is Black Friday an ethical holiday? Overcoming fear is the theme of a new song inspired by the hobbit. Top 10 songs on Spotify.
It's all on my monthly update, Celtfather Unkilted, show #287.
The podcast is brought to you by my amazing Patrons in the Gunn Runners Club on Patreon. I have some new subscribers, and I hope to make this an even more important part of my general promotion in the weeks ahead.
0:42 - SHOWS PLANNED FOR THE COMING MONTH
DEC 1: Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 5: Grant Park Farmer's Market @ 9 AM - Noon
DEC 8: Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 15: Season 9 Finale Coffee with The Celtfather @ 11 AM EST
DEC 16: Celtfather Live @ 7 PM EST
1:14 - MUSINGS: The Ethics of Black Friday
I'm pretty confident that you know all about Black Friday. Now, we also have Cyber Monday. These are two days when people open up their wallets and many businesses offer HUGE discounts.
I confess I am very torn by those holidays. On the one hand, I have my own business. CD sales are still one of the big ways I make money. My Patreon needs to be twice what it is for me to remove my dependence on CD and merch sales.
On the other hand is consumerism. We create so much waste. I'm not even gonna go into what that waste does to our environment and its effect on climate change.
One of the things I love about the new digital revolution is I can potentially create music and make a living without adding to the waste. One day I hope to sell out all my CDs. Then I will just release them on a limited basis, for those who truly love the media. My storage shelves will be mostly empty.
The Christmas holiday doesn't help. It's all about spending. It bothered me a lot more back in the 90s when I first heard about Buy Nothing Day.
That day was created in response to the consumerism. It's on the very same day as Black Friday. "Don't buy" is the message.
Back around 2001, it became possible to accept credit cards at gigs. But at the time, I was $15K in debt. All because of MY irresponsible use of credit cards.
It got me questioning. Should I accept credit card payments...and potentially have you, my customer, go into debt because of my products?
Eventually, I decided you should be responsible for yourself. But at the same time is that cop out?
This is one of those ethical dilemmas.
I was talking recently with people about ethics in healthcare. The question was raised: should a parent have full control of their child's healthcare? Do they know what's best for their child?
The quick answer is yes. I know what's best for my daughters.
But that comes from my privileged, fairly healthy family background. A parent who is strung out on drugs, sick, or poor or in abusive relationship. They might not be healthy enough to do what is best for their child.
There are so many nuances. There isn't one right answer. It's each different for each person.
My biggest complaint with corporations is that in order to be successful, they need to do what will make the most-profit for their business. That sounds reasonable. They should be allowed to make money freely, without government interference.
That is until you realize that they can dump sewage into our water, poison our air, and destroy our environment. They can murder people and not be culpable.
Because they are a business. The actions of the business will not financially impact the owners of that business.
Reminds of McDonalds: "Would you like to Supersize that?"
That phrase made them boatloads of money. The cost was the increased obesity of their customers.
It took regulations to stop them from using that simple sales phrase. Sure it made them more money. But was it ethical?
We are all manipulated by businesses trying to make a buck. That's why Black Friday changed from businesses saying, "Huh. We get a lot more sales on the day after Thanksgiving" to "Let's capitalize on that and start a holiday!"
I decided not to do a Black Friday sale th

21 min