24 episodes

The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast brings together academic researchers, government partners and others outside of academia to talk about research insights and real-world policy solutions in Pennsylvania and beyond.

This podcast series is supported by the Pennsylvania State University's Social Science Research Institute, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Administrative Data Accelerator, the Office of Vice President of Research, and the College of Health and Human Development.

The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast The Social Science Research Institute

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast brings together academic researchers, government partners and others outside of academia to talk about research insights and real-world policy solutions in Pennsylvania and beyond.

This podcast series is supported by the Pennsylvania State University's Social Science Research Institute, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Administrative Data Accelerator, the Office of Vice President of Research, and the College of Health and Human Development.

    Episode 22: A Government-Research Partnership in Action

    Episode 22: A Government-Research Partnership in Action

    We're closing out this semester's season with a conversation about prevention and partnerships. We focus on a discussion between a long-standing collaborative relationship between Penn State and the Pennsylvania Commonwealth government, which targets interventions and prevention work targeted towards youth and families. Our episode covers a wide span of topics, including why prevention and implementation work are difficult, but critical; the changes that happen when there's a political transition, and much more.We spoke to Janet Welsh, PhD (https://prevention.psu.edu/person/janet-welsh/), Research Professor at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Center, and the Principal Investigator of the Evidence-based Prevention Intervention and Support program (EPIS) (https://epis.psu.edu/) and SPEP™ (Standardized Program Evaluation Protocol) (https://epis.psu.edu/juvenile/spep) at Penn State, and Geoff Kolchin, Deputy Director of Unit of Violence Prevention Initiatives in the Office of Justice Programs at the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) (https://www.pccd.pa.gov/Pages/Default.aspx), about their decades long collaboration between EPIS and PCCD.Resources and Additional Information* Wrong Pocket Problem (https://pfs.urban.org/faq/what-wrong-pockets-problem)* PAYS Reports (https://www.pccd.pa.gov/Juvenile-Justice/Pages/Pennsylvania-Youth-Survey-(PAYS)-2021.aspx)The transcript is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/04/EIC-Podcast-Episode-22-EPIS-and-PCCD-Transcript-Updated-.pdf).

    • 1 hr
    Episode 21: The Knowledge Mobilization Problem

    Episode 21: The Knowledge Mobilization Problem

    For this month’s episode, we did something a little different. We spoke to two researchers with two different approaches to tackling the same problem: knowledge mobilization. In essence, the concept of knowledge mobilization focuses on making knowledge, resources or practices that exist in one space and making them accessible to specific audiences. We talked about the work behind SOSNetLab (https://sosnetlab.com/) (Social Opportunity Space Networking Lab) and the Research-to-Policy Collaboration (https://research2policy.org/), barriers to this type of research and implementation, and what the future has in store for addressing this problem.We spoke to Taylor Scott, PhD (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/people/scott-taylor#all)., Co-Director of the Research-to-Policy Collaboration (https://research2policy.org/) and Assistant Research Professor at the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Center at Penn State, and Alan J. Daly, PhD (https://profiles.ucsd.edu/alan.daly)., SOSNetLab (https://sosnetlab.com/) Chief Executive Dreamer, and Professor, University of California, San Diego as well as SOSNetLab’s full team, which includes: Mimi Lockton, Ed.D. (https://www.sandiego.edu/soles/faculty-and-staff/biography.php?profile_id=7752), SOSNETLAB Chief Project Catalyzer, and Doctoral Candidate at the University of California San Diego; Anita Caduff (https://eds.ucsd.edu/graduate/doctoral/phd/phd-students/phd3-profiles/acaduff.html), SOSNETLAB Chief Swiss Army Knife, and Ph.D. Candidate at the University of California San Diego, and Martin Rehm, Ph.D (https://www.merit.unu.edu/about-us/profile/?staff_id=1326)., SOSNETLAB Chief Data Wrangler, and Post-Doctoral Scholar at the University of Regensburg in Germany.Resources* SOSNetLab’s Website (https://sosnetlab.com/)* Research-to-Policy Collaboration’s Website (https://research2policy.org/)* Taylor mentions the work of Jennie Noll (https://hhd.psu.edu/contact/jennie-noll), Professor of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State, Director of the Center for Safe and Healthy Children, and a previous guest on this podcast (https://evidence2impact.com/episode-14-navigating-pennsylvanias-child-welfare-system-and-issues-of-child-maltreatment/); and Francesca Lopez (https://ed.psu.edu/directory/dr-francesca-lopez), the Waterbury Chair in Equity Pedagogy and Professor of Education at Penn State.* Additionally, Taylor discusses working with the Kauffman Foundation (https://www.kauffman.org/) and the William T. Grant Foundation (https://wtgrantfoundation.org/) to expand their work on entrepreneurial research.* SOSNet’s work is supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (https://www.gatesfoundation.org/).The transcript for the episode is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/Evidence-to-Impact-Podcast-SOSNet-and-Research-to-Policy-Knowledge-Mobilization-Transcript.pdf).

    Episode 20: Chronic Diseases: Underserved Communities, Prevention, and Genetic Factors

    Episode 20: Chronic Diseases: Underserved Communities, Prevention, and Genetic Factors

    This month's episode tackles a fascinating combination of topics involving the impact of biological and social factors on chronic diseases like obesity and diabetes, and the prevention and treatment efforts for those chronic diseases through state a...

    • 34 min
    Episode 19: Mental Health Screenings for Adolescents in the K-12 School System

    Episode 19: Mental Health Screenings for Adolescents in the K-12 School System

    This month's episode discusses mental health screenings for adolescents in the K-12 school system. We spoke to Deepa Sekhar, MD (https://pennstate.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/deepa-sekhar), Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics at the College of Medicine, and Executive Director, Penn State PRO Wellness (https://prowellness.childrens.pennstatehealth.org/); Perri Rosen, PhD, NCSP, Consulting Psychologist, Office of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Pennsylvania Dept. of Human Services (https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiD4u3I6o_7AhX8EGIAHbguB3MQFnoECBoQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dhs.pa.gov%2FServices%2FPages%2Fdefault.aspx&usg=AOvVaw0UpFHCYfe07zGKZ0GoIY94), and Steve Sharp, School Counselor in the Hempfield School District, and K-12 School Counseling Coordinator for the Hempfield School District about why having mental health screenings (or mood screenings) in K-12 schools makes a difference when helping children who might be struggling and getting them the resources that they need to succeed.Episode Resources and References* The SHIELD (https://prowellness.childrens.pennstatehealth.org/about-us/partners/health-resources-and-services-administration-hrsa/) study is mentioned several times throughout the episode. SHIELD stands for Screening in High Schools to Identify, Evaluate and Lower Depression.* The Student Assistance Program (https://www.education.pa.gov/Schools/safeschools/sap-pbis/SAP/Pages/default.aspx) (SAP) is a systematic team process used to mobilize school resources to remove barriers to learning. SAP is designed to assist in identifying issues including alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, and mental health issues which pose a barrier to a student’s success.* Steve mentions receiving a school safety grant through Pennsylvania Commission and Crime and Delinquency (https://www.pccd.pa.gov/Pages/Default.aspx) (PCCD). He also mentions getting an ESSER (https://www.education.pa.gov/Schools/safeschools/emergencyplanning/COVID-19/CARESAct/Pages/default.aspx) grant through the Department of Education.* Deepa discusses the SHIELD study receiving funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration (https://www.hrsa.gov/) and the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (https://www.pcori.org/).* Steve mentions using MTSS teams, which stands for multi-tiered systems of supports.* Lastly, Steven talks about the CAMS Model (https://cams-care.com/about-cams/) (Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality), which is a therapeutic framework for suicide-specific assessment and treatment of a patient’s suicidal risk.

    Episode 18: The Perfect Storm: College Students, Mental Health, and the Sense of Belonging on Campus

    Episode 18: The Perfect Storm: College Students, Mental Health, and the Sense of Belonging on Campus

    The end of the spring semester marks the release of another episode! This month, we tackled the tough topic of mental health among college students. We talked about how COVID-19 has impacted college students seeking mental health services, the challenges for counselors and administrators working in university mental health centers, policy solutions to the crisis, and other things that have happened as a result of the pandemic like changes in technology.We spoke to Maithreyi Gopalan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy and Social Science Research Institute co-funded faculty member at Penn State, and Brett Scofield, Ph.D., Associate Director of Counseling and Psychological Services at Penn State and Executive Director of Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) about mental health, college students, what universities are doing (and should be doing), and a little bit of everything in between.Episode Resources and References* There's been a series of articles in the New York Times about adolescent mental health that are worth perusing: Teens In Distress Are Swamping Pediatricians (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/10/health/pediatricians-mental-health-crisis-teens.html), ‘It’s Life or Death’: The Mental Health Crisis Among U.S. Teens (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/23/health/mental-health-crisis-teens.html), Hundreds of Suicidal Teens Sleep in Emergency Rooms. Every Night. (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/08/health/emergency-rooms-teen-mental-health.html), and Surgeon General Warns of Youth Mental Health Crisis. (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/07/science/pandemic-adolescents-depression-anxiety.html)* Maithreyi mentions a study (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X21005036?via%3Dihub) that she did with her colleagues, Stephanie Lanza, Ph.D. (https://hhd.psu.edu/contact/stephanie-lanza-0) and Ashley-Linden Carmichael, Ph.D., (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/people/linden-carmichael-ashley) from the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Center, about overall college experiences, the student community, and their sense of belonging and impact that may have on their well being, health, and academic performance.* Brett discusses the Clinical Load Index (CLI) (https://ccmh.psu.edu/clinical-load-index-cli), a metric used to measure the average annual caseload of a clinician at a mental health center.* Maithreyi mentions the dozens of calls for grant applications (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/funding/opportunities-announcements/listings/pas-sponsored) opened up by the National Institute of Mental Health about understanding the effect of the pandemic on mental health.* Brett discusses two researchers involved with projects at CCMH: Louis Castonguay, Ph.D. (https://psych.la.psu.edu/directory/lgc3) and Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D. (https://ed.psu.edu/directory/dr-jeffrey-hayes)The transcript for the episode is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/EIC-Podcast-College-Student-Mental-Health-Transcript-Final-Version.pdf).

    • 44 min
    Episode 17: Digging Deeper into the Juvenile Justice System

    Episode 17: Digging Deeper into the Juvenile Justice System

    We're back for our third season! Kicking off the 2022 season, we explore the juvenile justice system in Pennsylvania.We spoke to Megan Kurlychek, (https://publicpolicy.psu.edu/people/megan-kurlychek) Professor of Sociology, Criminology and Public Policy and Associate Director of the Criminal Justice Research Center (https://justicecenter.la.psu.edu/) at Penn State, and Rick Steele (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Pages/Our-Leaders.aspx#:~:text=Richard%20Steele%2C%20Executive%20Director,probation%20officer%20in%20that%20jurisdiction.), Executive Director of the Juvenile Court Judges’ Commission (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx) at the Pennsylvania Commonwealth, about their work in the juvenile justice field, the history of the juvenile justice system, prevention programs, the issue of recidivism, and more.Episode Resources and Notes* Megan mentions that she began her career working at the National Center for Juvenile Justice (https://www.ncjj.org/), located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.* Both Rick and Megan discuss the concept of parens patriae. According to the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/parens_patriae), parens patriae is Latin for "parent of the people." Under parens patriae, a state or court has a paternal and protective role over its citizens (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/citizen) or others subject to its jurisdiction.* Megan discusses the court case, In re Gault (https://www.uscourts.gov/educational-resources/educational-activities/facts-and-case-summary-re-gault), as one of the landmark Supreme Court cases that changed how juvenile justice was approached back in the 1960s.* Rick refers to the MAYSI-2 (http://www.nysap.us/maysi2/index.html), the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument – Second Version, when mentioning how behavioral health and substance use issues are assessed among justice-involved youth.* Additionally, Rick discusses how the Pennsylvania Commonwealth has incorporated the University of Cincinnati's EPICS (https://cech.uc.edu/about/centers/ucci/products/interventions/individual-interventions.html), Effective Practices in Community Supervision, into their probation model.* Rick mentions using a standardized program evaluation protocol based on the work by Mark Lipsey, Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University (https://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/bio/mark-lipsey).* Megan mentions a prevention program that partners nurses with young mothers called the Nurse-Family Partnership (https://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/).* The School-to-Prison Pipeline (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School-to-prison_pipeline) is something that both Megan and Rick discuss as it relates to prevention research and programming.* Megan talks about risk need assessments (https://youth.gov/youth-topics/juvenile-justice/risk-and-protective-factors) for assessing justice-involved youth. More information is available here (https://ojjdp.ojp.gov/model-programs-guide/literature-reviews/risk_needs_assessments_for_youths.pdf).* Rick discusses the Models for Change (https://www.modelsforchange.net/) program, which helped to advance reforms to make juvenile justice systems more fair, effective, rational, and developmentally appropriate. He also mentions the Big Brothers, Big Sisters (https://www.bbbs.org/) program, which is nationally renowned.* JCJC's reports (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Publications/Pages/default.aspx) are available online for anyone interested in reading more about their work.* Rick talks about working with other researchers in the field such as

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