20 episodes

The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast brings together academic researchers, government partners and others outside of academia to talk about research insights and real-world policy solutions in Pennsylvania and beyond.

This podcast series is supported by the Pennsylvania State University's Social Science Research Institute, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Administrative Data Accelerator, the Office of Vice President of Research, and the College of Health and Human Development.

The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast The Social Science Research Institute

    • Science
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The Evidence-to-Impact Podcast brings together academic researchers, government partners and others outside of academia to talk about research insights and real-world policy solutions in Pennsylvania and beyond.

This podcast series is supported by the Pennsylvania State University's Social Science Research Institute, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the Administrative Data Accelerator, the Office of Vice President of Research, and the College of Health and Human Development.

    Episode 18: The Perfect Storm: College Students, Mental Health, and the Sense of Belonging on Campus

    Episode 18: The Perfect Storm: College Students, Mental Health, and the Sense of Belonging on Campus

    The end of the spring semester marks the release of another episode! This month, we tackled the tough topic of mental health among college students. We talked about how COVID-19 has impacted college students seeking mental health services, the challenges for counselors and administrators working in university mental health centers, policy solutions to the crisis, and other things that have happened as a result of the pandemic like changes in technology.We spoke to Maithreyi Gopalan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education and Public Policy and Social Science Research Institute co-funded faculty member at Penn State, and Brett Scofield, Ph.D., Associate Director of Counseling and Psychological Services at Penn State and Executive Director of Center for Collegiate Mental Health (CCMH) about mental health, college students, what universities are doing (and should be doing), and a little bit of everything in between.Episode Resources and References* There's been a series of articles in the New York Times about adolescent mental health that are worth perusing: Teens In Distress Are Swamping Pediatricians (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/10/health/pediatricians-mental-health-crisis-teens.html), ‘It’s Life or Death’: The Mental Health Crisis Among U.S. Teens (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/23/health/mental-health-crisis-teens.html), Hundreds of Suicidal Teens Sleep in Emergency Rooms. Every Night. (https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/08/health/emergency-rooms-teen-mental-health.html), and Surgeon General Warns of Youth Mental Health Crisis. (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/07/science/pandemic-adolescents-depression-anxiety.html)* Maithreyi mentions a study (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1054139X21005036?via%3Dihub) that she did with her colleagues, Stephanie Lanza, Ph.D. (https://hhd.psu.edu/contact/stephanie-lanza-0) and Ashley-Linden Carmichael, Ph.D., (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/people/linden-carmichael-ashley) from the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Center, about overall college experiences, the student community, and their sense of belonging and impact that may have on their well being, health, and academic performance.* Brett discusses the Clinical Load Index (CLI) (https://ccmh.psu.edu/clinical-load-index-cli), a metric used to measure the average annual caseload of a clinician at a mental health center.* Maithreyi mentions the dozens of calls for grant applications (https://www.nimh.nih.gov/funding/opportunities-announcements/listings/pas-sponsored) opened up by the National Institute of Mental Health about understanding the effect of the pandemic on mental health.* Brett discusses two researchers involved with projects at CCMH: Louis Castonguay, Ph.D. (https://psych.la.psu.edu/directory/lgc3) and Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D. (https://ed.psu.edu/directory/dr-jeffrey-hayes)The transcript for the episode is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/EIC-Podcast-College-Student-Mental-Health-Transcript-Final-Version.pdf).

    • 44 min
    Episode 17: Digging Deeper into the Juvenile Justice System

    Episode 17: Digging Deeper into the Juvenile Justice System

    We're back for our third season! Kicking off the 2022 season, we explore the juvenile justice system in Pennsylvania.We spoke to Megan Kurlychek, (https://publicpolicy.psu.edu/people/megan-kurlychek) Professor of Sociology, Criminology and Public Policy and Associate Director of the Criminal Justice Research Center (https://justicecenter.la.psu.edu/) at Penn State, and Rick Steele (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Pages/Our-Leaders.aspx#:~:text=Richard%20Steele%2C%20Executive%20Director,probation%20officer%20in%20that%20jurisdiction.), Executive Director of the Juvenile Court Judges’ Commission (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx) at the Pennsylvania Commonwealth, about their work in the juvenile justice field, the history of the juvenile justice system, prevention programs, the issue of recidivism, and more.Episode Resources and Notes* Megan mentions that she began her career working at the National Center for Juvenile Justice (https://www.ncjj.org/), located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.* Both Rick and Megan discuss the concept of parens patriae. According to the Legal Information Institute at Cornell Law (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/parens_patriae), parens patriae is Latin for "parent of the people." Under parens patriae, a state or court has a paternal and protective role over its citizens (https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/citizen) or others subject to its jurisdiction.* Megan discusses the court case, In re Gault (https://www.uscourts.gov/educational-resources/educational-activities/facts-and-case-summary-re-gault), as one of the landmark Supreme Court cases that changed how juvenile justice was approached back in the 1960s.* Rick refers to the MAYSI-2 (http://www.nysap.us/maysi2/index.html), the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument – Second Version, when mentioning how behavioral health and substance use issues are assessed among justice-involved youth.* Additionally, Rick discusses how the Pennsylvania Commonwealth has incorporated the University of Cincinnati's EPICS (https://cech.uc.edu/about/centers/ucci/products/interventions/individual-interventions.html), Effective Practices in Community Supervision, into their probation model.* Rick mentions using a standardized program evaluation protocol based on the work by Mark Lipsey, Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University (https://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/bio/mark-lipsey).* Megan mentions a prevention program that partners nurses with young mothers called the Nurse-Family Partnership (https://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/).* The School-to-Prison Pipeline (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School-to-prison_pipeline) is something that both Megan and Rick discuss as it relates to prevention research and programming.* Megan talks about risk need assessments (https://youth.gov/youth-topics/juvenile-justice/risk-and-protective-factors) for assessing justice-involved youth. More information is available here (https://ojjdp.ojp.gov/model-programs-guide/literature-reviews/risk_needs_assessments_for_youths.pdf).* Rick discusses the Models for Change (https://www.modelsforchange.net/) program, which helped to advance reforms to make juvenile justice systems more fair, effective, rational, and developmentally appropriate. He also mentions the Big Brothers, Big Sisters (https://www.bbbs.org/) program, which is nationally renowned.* JCJC's reports (https://www.jcjc.pa.gov/Publications/Pages/default.aspx) are available online for anyone interested in reading more about their work.* Rick talks about working with other researchers in the field such as

    Episode 16: Debunking the U.S. Census

    Episode 16: Debunking the U.S. Census

    This month's episode tackles all things related to the U.S. Census. We discussed the decennial Census, the data products created and released from the U.S. Census Bureau, the current demographic trends and challenges, and measuring hard-to-reach populations.We spoke to Raeven Chandler, Ph.D., (https://pop.psu.edu/people/rfc134) Director of the Pennsylvania Population Network (PPN) (https://pop.psu.edu/pennsylvania-population-network) at the Population Research Institute (PRI) (https://pop.psu.edu/), and Assistant Research Professor of Rural Sociology at Penn State, and Eric Jensen, Ph.D. (https://www.census.gov/newsroom/bios/eric-jensen.html), Senior Technical Expert for Demographic Analysis in the Population Division at the U.S. Census Bureau (https://www.census.gov/), about their work as demographers, both in academic and government settings, and some issues around collecting and analyzing data, especially as it pertains to the 2020 Census.Episode Resources and Notes* Eric mentions the American Community Survey (ACS) (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs) and the Current Population Survey (https://www.census.gov/programs-surveys/cps.html) as some examples of the many data products that the U.S. Census Bureau produces for the public.* Eric discusses how Penn State has a Federal Statistical Research Data Center (https://psurdc.psu.edu/) (RDC), a place where qualified researchers can access restricted microdata from a variety of statistical agencies.* Raeven and Eric talk about some issues around collecting data in college towns across the United States. Most recently, some towns have said that they want to challenge the results of the 2020 Census (https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/577276-college-towns-say-they-plan-to-challenge-mid-pandemic-census-results?rl=1).* Raeven discusses the concerns surrounding questions about Latino and Hispanic heritage questions on the 2020 Census. For more information about that topic, this is a blog post from the U.S. Census about the issue (https://www.census.gov/newsroom/blogs/random-samplings/2021/08/improvements-to-2020-census-race-hispanic-origin-question-designs.html).* Eric mentions the U.S. Census Bureau working with two Penn State demographers, John Iceland, Ph.D. (https://sociology.la.psu.edu/people/jdi10), Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Demography, and Jenny Van Hook, Ph.D. (https://sociology.la.psu.edu/people/jxv21), Roy C. Buck Professor of Sociology and Demography at Penn State. He also mentions Sue Capella at the Pennsylvania State Data Center (https://pasdc.hbg.psu.edu/), which is part of Penn State Harrisburg.The transcript for this episode can be found here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/EIC-Podcast-US-Census.pdf).

    • 46 min
    Episode 15: Innovations In Healthcare: Enhancing Value, Health Equity, And The Social Determinants Of Health

    Episode 15: Innovations In Healthcare: Enhancing Value, Health Equity, And The Social Determinants Of Health

    In this month’s episode, we tackled innovations in healthcare. Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen a focus on various healthcare innovations and technology like artificial intelligence, cloud-enabled solutions, and inpatient telehealth, but other innovations are important, too. Some of these focused on in Pennsylvania include how we can get more value out of the country’s healthcare system without sacrificing the quality of care and lowering barriers for underserved populations.We spoke to Dr. Doug Jacobs, M.D., M.P.H., (https://www.linkedin.com/in/doug-jacobs-md-mph-3658b0a8/) Chief Medical Officer and Chief Innovation Officer in the Office of the Secretary at the Pennsylvania Department of Human Services (https://www.dhs.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx), and Meg Small, Ph.D. (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/people/small-meg#all), Director of Social Innovation and Assistant Research Professor at the Penn State Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/), about what it means to have a healthcare system that pays for value, promotes health equity and addresses the social determinants of health; measuring the success of healthcare innovation; healthcare innovations involving mobile technology; and other improvements to expanding access while reducing healthcare costs.Episode Resources and Notes* For more information about DHS’s efforts on healthcare innovation, visit this page (https://www.dhs.pa.gov/HealthInnovation/Pages/default.aspx).* In response to a question about how health equity frames prevention science, Meg brings up a collaboration project with a woman named Lavelle Smith Hall, an entrepreneur and founder of a company called MOMLogics (https://momlogics.com/). MOMLogics serves Black moms and empowers them with parenting strategies so they can enjoy better relationships with their children, spouses, and families.* Meg discusses a program called Museums for All (https://www.phmc.pa.gov/Museums/Pages/Museums-For-All-.aspx) that allows families and children receiving food assistance (SNAP benefits) free or reduced admission to over 700 museums throughout the United States simply by presenting their EBT card.* Meg mentions the research of Karen Bierman (https://psych.la.psu.edu/directory/kb2), Ph.D., Evan Pugh Professor, Professor of Psychology (https://psych.la.psu.edu/) and Human Development and Family Studies, and Director of the Child Study Center (https://csc.la.psu.edu/) at Penn State. For more of her work, visit Karen’s Google Scholar page (https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=Xg9H9jsAAAAJ&hl=en).* Meg mentions Penn State faculty affiliate and pediatrician, Laura Jana (https://www.prevention.psu.edu/people/jana-laura), M.D., and her work on adopting 

    Episode 14: Navigating Pennsylvania’s Child Welfare System And Issues Of Child Maltreatment

    Episode 14: Navigating Pennsylvania’s Child Welfare System And Issues Of Child Maltreatment

    This month marks the beginning of the third season of this podcast!
    We're kicking things off by exploring the opportunities and challenges of Pennsylvania's child welfare system. For the past several years, there has been an ongoing partnership between Penn State researchers and government partners to change the Commonwealth's county-based child welfare system through legislative and policy actions. We spoke to Jennie Noll, Ph.D. (https://hhd.psu.edu/contact/jennie-noll), Professor in the Department of Human Development and Family Studies and the Director of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network (https://www.solutionsnetwork.psu.edu/) at Penn State University, and Brian Bornman, Esq. (https://www.linkedin.com/in/brian-bornman-9b914615/), Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Children and Youth Administrators Association (http://www.pcya.org/Pages/default.aspx), about their collaborative process, the challenges of navigating a stressed bureaucratic system, and what the future holds for resolving issues of child welfare and maltreatment.

    Episode Resources and Notes

    * Brian mentions several horrific cases of child abuse that made headlines in Pennsylvania, including the Danieal Kelly case in Philadelphia (https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna25970609), the Grace Packer case (https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/5-years-after-grace-packers-murder-changes-still-needed-to-protect-foster-kids/2705990/), and the Jerry Sandusky case (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penn_State_child_sex_abuse_scandal). (Please note that these links include severe graphic descriptions of child abuse and violence.)


    The transcript for this episode is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/Evidence-to-Impact-Podcast-Child-Welfare.pdf).

    Episode 13: The Pandemic Perspective: Examining The Hardship Of Unemployment And The Pandemic Labor Market

    Episode 13: The Pandemic Perspective: Examining The Hardship Of Unemployment And The Pandemic Labor Market

     
    For this month's episode, we explore a topic that we have wanted to cover for some time: unemployment and the pandemic labor market.
    As the nation begins to "reopen" and the economy begins shifting, many states have begun ending pandemic-era unemployment insurance benefits (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/15/business/state-pandemic-unemployment-benefits-ending.html). For many, unemployment insurance was the only thing keeping them afloat following the unprecedented unemployment crisis at the beginning of the pandemic. And yet, despite the unbelievable numbers of unemployed workers in our country, the stigma of receiving unemployment insurance persists. We asked ourselves why, in a time of tremendous health and economic crisis, are we giving folks who need help a hard time? We know that research (https://www.census.gov/data/experimental-data-products/household-pulse-survey.html) shows that many families and individuals are still out of work and struggling to afford adequate food and pay mortgages or rent. Like other topics we covered - childcare and food insecurity, for example - the pandemic has made it abundantly clear that our country's systems are unsustainable and not enough to support the financial needs of families and individuals.
    To debunk some of the concerns and myths of unemployment and dive into the shifting economy, we spoke to Sarah Damaske, Ph.D. (https://sociology.la.psu.edu/people/sad32), Associate Professor of Labor and Employment Relations (https://ler.la.psu.edu/), Sociology (https://sociology.la.psu.edu/) and Women's Studies at Penn State and Associate Director of the Population Research Institute (PRI) (https://pop.psu.edu/), and Mark Price, Ph.D. (https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-price-2865047/), Associate Director of Research at the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) (https://www.psea.org/). We discussed the stigma of experiencing unemployment or receiving unemployment insurance, how and why men and women experience unemployment differently, wage stagnation in the education sector, and more.
    We encourage listeners to also check out Sarah's new book, The Tolls of Uncertainty: How Privilege and the Guilt Gap Shape Unemployment in America (https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691200149/the-tolls-of-uncertainty). While it is not required reading for this episode, it does paint a picture of pre-pandemic unemployment and provides salient policy recommendations to our unemployment system.

    Episode Resources and Notes

    * Sarah's new book, The Tolls of Uncertainty: How Privilege and the Guilt Gap Shape Unemployment in America, is out now. Buy it through Princeton University Press (https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691200149/the-tolls-of-uncertainty) or on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Tolls-Uncertainty-Privilege-Unemployment-America/dp/0691200149).
    * Sarah and Mark mention the work of Kathryn Edwards (https://www.rand.org/about/people/e/edwards_kathryn_a.html), an economist at the Rand Corporation.
    * Sarah mentions the Great Depression-era photographs by Dorothea Lange (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange) as inspiration for her book. You can find more of Dorothea Lange's work here (https://www.moma.org/artists/3373?=undefined&page=&direction=).


    The transcript for this episode is available here (https://evidence2impact.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/EIC-Podcast-Episode-13-Unemployment_.pdf).
     
     

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