88 episodes

Welcome to The Dirt on the Past from The Extreme History Project and Gallatin Valley Community Radio, KGVM. Whether digging up a site or dusting off the archives, we bring you some of the most fascinating and cutting edge research in history and archaeology, and discuss why it matters today. Join co-hosts, Crystal Alegria and Nancy Mahoney as we converse with professionals in the fields of history, archaeology, and anthropology who bring the past…into the present.

The Extreme History Project: The Dirt on the Past The Extreme History Project

    • History
    • 4.8 • 33 Ratings

Welcome to The Dirt on the Past from The Extreme History Project and Gallatin Valley Community Radio, KGVM. Whether digging up a site or dusting off the archives, we bring you some of the most fascinating and cutting edge research in history and archaeology, and discuss why it matters today. Join co-hosts, Crystal Alegria and Nancy Mahoney as we converse with professionals in the fields of history, archaeology, and anthropology who bring the past…into the present.

    The History of Pockets

    The History of Pockets

    Join Nancy and Crystal as they discuss the history of pockets! We delve deep into the fascinating history of pockets, exploring how these seemingly mundane accessories have shaped human lives and society over centuries. Drawing insights from Hannah Carlson's "Pockets: An Intimate History of How We Keep Things Close" and Barbara Burman and Ariane Fennetaux's "The Pocket: A Hidden History of Women's Lives, 1660–1900," we uncover the evolution of pockets from their humble beginnings as tie-on accessories to their symbolic significance in fashion and gender roles. From the practicality of early pouches to the complex social messages conveyed by pocket size and placement, we unravel the intimate relationship between humans and their pockets, shedding light on a hidden aspect of history that speaks volumes about culture, identity, and everyday life.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    The Barton Gulch Archaeological Site

    The Barton Gulch Archaeological Site

    April is Archaeology Month in Montana! In honor of this, join Nancy and Crystal as they discuss a significant archaeological site located in southwest Montana called the Barton Gulch site. The oldest occupation of the Barton Gulch site is dated to 9400 BP.  Nancy and Crystal discuss the remains of earth ovens found at Barton Gulch, and talk about the possibly uses for these ovens and the plant remains recovered during archaeological excavation. The presence of these ovens and other cooking features implies that the people who lived and cooked at this place had detailed procedures for preparing plant and animal remains.
    Join us for this discussion and to learn more about this important archaeological site and many others, read "Six Hundred Generations: An Archaeological History of Montana" by Carl Davis. 

    • 58 min
    Historic Photographs with Michael Fox

    Historic Photographs with Michael Fox

    Join us as we talk with Museum of the Rockies (MOR) Curator, Michael Fox, about historic photographs and cameras in the MOR collection. We look at two historic cameras dating to the late 19th century and 1930s time period. We then dive into a series of historic photographs that capture the historic west through photographic imagery. Historic photographs are an important way for historians and archaeologists to learn more about the past, providing a primary source of information about how people lived, showing how their lives and how they were similar or different from our lives today. They can answer questions we may have, but they can also cause us to ask more questions like why was this photo taken, who took it, why did they take it? But, by looking very closely at photos, we can see information and evidence that can answer our questions.

    • 1 hr 20 min
    The Last Green Valley with Mark Sullivan

    The Last Green Valley with Mark Sullivan

    Join us as we talk with Mark Sullivan, a #1 New York Times bestselling author who wrote The Last Green Valley about a family, the Martels, that flee the Ukraine in 1944 to arrive and eventually settle in Bozeman, MT. We discuss the families harrowing journey as they, along with thousands of others make the Long Trek. Join us for this important conversation with Mark Sullivan.
    Mark Sullivan is the acclaimed author of twenty novels, including Beneath a Scarlet Sky, which has been published in thirty-seven languages, and All the Glimmering Stars, which debuts in May. He has also written the #1 NYT bestselling Private Series with James Patterson and received numerous accolades for his writing. He grew up in Medfield, Massachusetts, and graduated from Hamilton College with a BA in English before working as a volunteer in the Peace Corps in Niger, West Africa. Upon his return to the United States, he earned a graduate degree from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and began a career in investigative journalism. An avid skier and adventurer, he lives with his wife in Bozeman, Montana.

    • 56 min
    Sauropods, Museum Education and Fossils for Kids with Ashley Hall

    Sauropods, Museum Education and Fossils for Kids with Ashley Hall

    Join us as we talk with Museum Educator Ashley Hall about her career as a museum educator at the Museum of the Rockies, her research on Sauropod feet and her books including Fossils for Kids: A Junior Scientist’s Guide to Dinosaur Bones and Ancient Animals, and Prehistoric Life on Earth and Prehistoric Worlds: Stomp Into the Epic Lands Ruled by Dinosaurs (due out at the end of March 2024).  
    Ashley is a dynamic paleontologist, naturalist, and museum educator. Originally from South Bend, Indiana, she grew up loving dinosaurs from an early age and was inspired by holiday trips to Chicago’s Field Museum to pursue a career in natural history.
    Ashley earned her Bachelor of Arts in anthropology (focus: Zooarchaeology) and animal behavior from Indiana University, Bloomington. After graduation, she spent nearly a decade working as a science educator for various educational institutions in southern California, including the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, and the La Brea Tar Pits. During this time, Ashley also served as the assistant curator of paleontology at the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology in Claremont, California. While with the “Alf,” she managed the fossil collection and participated in fieldwork including Late Cretaceous dinosaur excavations in the Grand-Staircase Escalante National Monument in Utah and Miocene mammal reconnaissance paleontology in the Mojave Desert’s Rainbow Basin.
    Ashley relocated to Ohio where she worked as a naturalist for the Cleveland Metroparks reservation system before taking a position with the Cleveland Museum of Natural as the adult programs coordinator. 
    When Ashley is not educating the public in person, she is an active science communicator on social media. Ashley has presented several invited workshops on communicating science through social media at professional, scientific meetings, including the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology and the Association for Materials and Methods in Paleontology annual conferences. Her scientific research has focused on sauropod claw morphology and function and the evolution of birds from deposits at the La Brea Tar Pits.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    American Burial Ground with Sarah Keyes

    American Burial Ground with Sarah Keyes

    We talked with Historian Sarah Keyes about her new book, "American Burial Ground: A New History of the Overland Trail." We delve into the history of the Overland Trail, discussing the 6,600 migrants who perished along the treacherous journey westward, their final resting places often marking the landscape of Indigenous land. Keyes' explains how the graves of these migrants emerge not just as tragic markers of a treacherous journey but as pivotal sites that shaped the course of U.S. expansion into the West. With death at the forefront, the Overland Trail transforms from a tale of triumph to one of profound struggle, where Indigenous resilience and resistance intersect with white settlers' ambitions. Keyes' reimagining of this historic touchstone challenges conventional narratives, revealing a complex history of migration, dispossession, and the indelible imprint of death on the American landscape. We highlight two artifacts from the Museum of the Rockies collection including a spur, that possible belonged to trailblazer, John Bozeman and a Log Cabin design quilt made before the Civil War and transported west to Montana Territory by the Lucy Nave Tinsley family. Join us for this important conversation.






     





     
    To purchase a copy of American Burial Ground, follow this link. https://www.pennpress.org/9781512824513/american-burial-ground/.
     

    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
33 Ratings

33 Ratings

Tópa Rocks ,

Love, Love

The range of this podcast is so broad it is constantly keeping me engaged. I have listened to topics and learned things I never learned about in school. This notion of the good, the bad and ugly of history is so relevant for us today as we navigate the challenges in today’s society. This is a must podcast if you are open to being challenged about the world around you. I always feel just a bit smarter after an episode!

Alex Veliky ,

Your Home for Time Travel

The home range of this podcast is broad, deep and gritty. Whether encountering the n’er do wells and Indigenous Nations of Yellowstone Country or exploring the origins of our bipedal ancestors - you can be sure you will get all the dirt.

Elizabeth Clayborne ,

Episode on Marija Gimbutas

I SO love that I live in a time where I can count on other lovers of learning to make a podcast telling me all about a deeply niche subject. I wanted to learn about Marija Gimbutas and how valid her theories on the Great Goddess cultures were. This episode helped to explain the current state of research and thinking on the subject. Loved the episode, loved how knowledgeable the ladies were, and will definitely be coming back for more.

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