476 episodes

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. The Film Comment Podcast, hosted by editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute, is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture. Support Film Comment.

The Film Comment Podcast Film Comment Magazine

    • TV & Film
    • 4.2 • 222 Ratings

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. The Film Comment Podcast, hosted by editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute, is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture. Support Film Comment.

    Christine Smallwood on Chantal Akerman’s La Captive

    Christine Smallwood on Chantal Akerman’s La Captive

    Christine Smallwood’s new book on Chantal Akerman’s Proust adaptation, La Captive, is, among many things, a meditation on the act of criticism. Published as part of The Decadent Editions series from Fireflies Press, this slim, pocket-sized volume takes Akerman’s year-2000 feature as a jumping-off point for an exploration of the great Belgian filmmaker’s monumental career and life, Marcel Proust’s autobiographical tendencies, and Smallwood’s own turbulent, pandemic-era homelife. Blending criticism, biography, and memoir, Smallwood beautifully shows how watching, reading, and writing are inextricable from lived experience.

    On today’s Podcast, Film Comment editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute sat down with the writer to talk about her book, the role of memory in their watching and reading, their favorite Akerman films, and, of course, La Captive itself: a brilliant, ambiguous, and Vertigo-inflected interpretation of what might be the most disturbing volume of In Search of Lost Time.

    • 45 min
    Bertrand Bonello on The Beast

    Bertrand Bonello on The Beast

    Last fall, director Bertrand Bonello’s latest, The Beast, was a thrilling highlight of the festival circuit. The film is a loose, two-and-a-half-hour, time-and-space-jumping adaptation of Henry James’ 1903 novella The Beast in the Jungle, in which a man refuses love believing that he is destined for a catastrophe. In The Beast, a woman named Gabrielle (Léa Seydoux) is thwarted in her quest for romance with Louis (George MacKay) across three different historical periods by multiple catastrophes: in 1910, by the Great Flood of Paris; in 2014, by incel culture; and in 2044, by a world dominated by artificial intelligence in which people are purified of their traumatic memories. All this spells doom for love.

    It’s an unpredictable and expansive film that brings together references from cinema, literature, art, and internet culture into a movie that feels classical in its construction and, at the same time, extremely contemporary in its subject matter and narrative twists—a vision of what it feels like to be alive today. And boy, is it creepy! On today’s Podcast, Film Comment Editor Devika Girish was joined by Bonello to talk about the film, which arrives in theaters on Friday, April 5.

    • 35 min
    New Directors/New Films 2024, with Vadim Rizov and Alissa Wilkinson

    New Directors/New Films 2024, with Vadim Rizov and Alissa Wilkinson

    Every spring the New Directors/New Films festival at Film at Lincoln Center and MoMA puts on an exciting showcase of movies by the best emerging filmmakers around the world. It’s always a reliable sign of the trends to come and the talents to look out for—past editions have featured early films by Spike Lee, Christopher Nolan, Kelly Reichardt, and others.

    Over the past few years, Film Comment has established our own annual tradition of previewing the best movies in the New Directors/New Films lineup with local critics. This time around, FC editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute were joined by Vadim Rizov (Filmmaker Magazine) and Alissa Wilkinson (The New York Times) for a rundown of some of the gems in the 2024 edition, including including A Good Place, Dreaming & Dying, The Day I Met You, Explanation for Everything, and more.

    • 52 min
    The Films of Med Hondo, with Aboubakar Sanogo

    The Films of Med Hondo, with Aboubakar Sanogo

    In our May-June 2020 issue, the scholar Aboubakar Sanogo wrote of Med Hondo, the late, great Mauritanian-French filmmaker: “For Hondo, decolonization and independence were not simply a matter of regime change from colonial to postcolonial, but rather a radical geopolitical and avant-gardist project. The cinema had its part to play in the realization of this emancipatory vision by liberating itself from all varieties of dominance, including those of form and tradition.” Hondo’s brilliant and idiosyncratic ouevre is a testament to that emancipatory vision. From his debut feature Soleil O to the grand anti-colonial musical West Indies; from the collaborative immigrant documentary My Neighbors to the anti-police noir Black Light, Hondo’s films are both formally ingenious and politically audacious. On March 22, Anthology Film Archives will kick off a weeklong retrospective of Hondo’s works, including some brand-new restorations. The series is organized by none other than Aboubakar Sanogo, who joined us on today’s episode to discuss Hondo’s life and legacy.

    • 1 hr 27 min
    Oscars Preview with The Los Angeles Review of Books

    Oscars Preview with The Los Angeles Review of Books

    It’s once again that time of year: that’s right, the Academy Awards are just around the corner. Before the winners are revealed on Sunday, Film Comment Editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute teamed up with some colleagues from Tinseltown—the editors of the Los Angeles Review of Books—to preview this year’s nominees. Eric Newman, editor-at-large at LARB, and Annie Berke, the publication’s Film & TV editor, joined us for a special collaboration with their podcast, the LARB Radio Hour. We had spirited debates about all the Best Picture nominees—from Oppenheimer to Killers of the Flower Moon to The Holdovers—and also talk about trends, surprises, and snubs.

    The Los Angeles Review of Books is a reader-supported online magazine and quarterly print journal that publishes incisive, rigorous, and engaging writing on contemporary literature and culture. If you’re interested in supporting their mission, consider becoming a member at lareviewofbooks.org/membership, where you can get access to LARB’s exclusive book club, featuring members-only chats with editors and luminary authors, in addition to a subscription to their quarterly journal.

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Berlinale 2024 #6, with Jordan Cronk, Giovanni Marchini Camia, and Beatrice Loayza

    Berlinale 2024 #6, with Jordan Cronk, Giovanni Marchini Camia, and Beatrice Loayza

    The 2024 Berlinale wrapped up on Sunday, February 25, after a fortnight of buzzy premieres and fraught political controversies. The Film Comment crew was on the ground throughout the festival, reporting on each day’s goings-on via daily Podcasts, dispatches, interviews and more. On the final Friday of the festival, FC Editor Devika Girish gathered critics Jordan Cronk, Giovanni Marchini Camia, and Beatrice Loayza to discuss a last haul of films from the lineup—including Encounters prizewinner Direct Action, Generation 14plus prizewinner Who By Fire, Victor Kossakovsky’s Architecton, Kazik Radwanski’s Matt & Mara, Christine Angot’s A Family, and Travis Wilkerson’s Through the Graves the Wind Is Blowing. Catch up with all our other Berlinale coverage on filmcomment.com—there’s more coming this week!

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
222 Ratings

222 Ratings

La Escuelita ,

Put some respect on Film Comment’s name yall

I didn’t realize FC had so many haters! But then again most of yall have terrible taste :)

j6584 ,

Essential for all lovers of cinema

Much more insightful than other film podcasts I’ve listened to. Breath of fresh air!

Chiquitao ,

Are the hosts trust fund adults that got lucky with this job ?

I’ve listened to many episodes and could not believe this is a podcast that’s professionally produced. It’s very dull and the two hosts lack personality . They also do not come off as knowledgeable about film which is so disappointing because I was so excited to find a new podcast featuring talking about movies ! Perhaps Film Comment is a trust fund / socialite run program ? Sure sounds like it ….(also , use daddy’s money to get better audio and hire new hosts ).

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