373 episodes

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Our podcast is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture and subscribe today.

The Film Comment Podcast Film Comment Magazine

    • TV & Film
    • 4.3 • 185 Ratings

Founded in 1962, Film Comment has been the home of independent film journalism for over 50 years, publishing in-depth interviews, critical analysis, and feature coverage of mainstream, art-house, and avant-garde filmmaking from around the world. Our podcast is a weekly space for critical conversation about film, with a look at topical issues, new releases, and the big picture. Film Comment is a nonprofit publication that relies on the support of readers. Support film culture and subscribe today.

    Irma Vep and The Rehearsal, with Adam Nayman and Beatrice Loayza

    Irma Vep and The Rehearsal, with Adam Nayman and Beatrice Loayza

    This week's podcast initially began as a sequel to our episode about Irma Vep from a few weeks ago, in which Adam Nayman and Beatrice Loayza joined us to discuss Olivier Assayas's new HBO series. We had only seen four episodes at the time, and we wanted to reconvene our guests, now that the miniseries has finished its run of eight episodes. But as we dug into the film-within-a-film rabbit holes of Irma Vep, its commentaries on auteurism and autofiction, and how it blurs the lines between reality, narrative, and fantasy, we realized that it echoed the themes of another series everyone has been talking about recently: The Rehearsal, by Nathan Fielder. So this episode brings you a double dose of meta: Irma Vep and The Rehearsal, and the ethics of making movies about oneself, other people, and movie-making itself.

    • 59 min
    Nathaniel Dorsky and Jerome Hiler on NYC's Underground Cinema

    Nathaniel Dorsky and Jerome Hiler on NYC's Underground Cinema

    This week we have a special treat for listeners: a conversation with avant-garde filmmaking legends Nathaniel Dorsky and Jerome Hiler, and programmer and Light Industry co-founder Thomas Beard. Thomas, along with Film at Lincoln Center programmer Dan Sullivan, has curated New York, 1962–1964: Underground and Experimental Cinema, an upcoming series spotlighting the rise of what Jonas Mekas described as the "New American Cinema." Opening on July 29, the series takes place in conjunction with related programs at the Jewish Museum and Film Forum.

    In a wide-ranging conversation about a pivotal moment in American film history, Dorsky—whose Ingreen (1964) screens as part of the FLC series—and Hiler regaled us with anecdotes about their partnership in life and filmmaking, the state of moviegoing and movie-making in the New York of the '60s, and the culture-shifting exploits of Jonas Mekas, Gregory J. Markopoulous, Stan Brakhage, Bruce Connor, and others. We also chatted about Hiler's fascinating in-progress film about medieval stained glass, "Cinema Before 1300," and a new book, Illuminated Hours. Nathaniel Dorsky and Jerome Hiler, which was published in Spanish earlier this year and will be available soon in English.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Restoration and preservation with Ina Archer and Shivendra Singh Dungarpur

    Restoration and preservation with Ina Archer and Shivendra Singh Dungarpur

    In a recent Film Comment Letter interview, Academy Film Archive preservationist Mark Toscano said: “to me, restoration has a variable definition, because it’s not embodying any specific technique or approach. It is more of a conceptual process by which you’re making sure that the film retains its qualities as a work that was made by a person—especially experimental work made by an individual.”

    Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish wanted to dig a little deeper into Mark’s comments, and into the technically and philosophically challenging ins and outs of film preservation and restoration, so they invited two experts to join the podcast and guide them through the subject: critic and media conservator Ina Archer and Shivendra Singh Dungarpur, founder and director of the Film Heritage Foundation. Both also provide details on some exciting projects they’re engaged in: Ina talks about preserving Robert Goodwin’s independent blaxploitation flick Black Chariot and Jessie Maple’s 1981 drama Will, while Shivendra breaks down the restorations of two major works by Indian filmmaker Govindan Aravindan, Kummatty and Thamp̄.

    • 54 min
    Cinematographer Hélène Louvart on Murina and more

    Cinematographer Hélène Louvart on Murina and more

    This week, Film Comment editors Clinton Krute and Devika Girish talk to a cinematographer who’s worked with everyone from Agnès Varda to Wim Wenders to Eliza Hittman to Alice Rohrwacher. Over the last three decades, Hélène Louvart has acquired a reputation for her gorgeous lensing of women’s stories and her ability to capture movement with rare immediacy and grace.

    Hélène’s talents are on striking display in Murina, a new coming-of-age film directed by Antoneta Alamat Kusijanovic. Murina tells the story of a Croatian teen (played by newcomer Gracija Filipović) navigating a treacherous passage to adulthood in an intensely patriarchal milieu. With intimate close-ups, breathtaking underwater sequences, and beautiful shots of the island where the film is set, Hélène’s images give arresting form to the protagonist’s awakening to her own desires.

    The cinematographer called in from her home in Paris to talk about how she crafted the film’s visual language, the care required to capture women as both subjects and objects of the gaze, and the technical challenges and pleasures of shooting underwater.

    • 44 min
    Movie Gifts with Nathan Lee and Gavin Smith

    Movie Gifts with Nathan Lee and Gavin Smith

    This week sees another episode of our Movie Gifts podcast. It’s like Secret Santa but for movies—each participant picks a title for another that the recipient hasn’t seen. It’s a fun way to share enthusiasms and gain new insights on old favorites. For this round, Film Comment co-deputy editors Devika Girish and Clinton Krute invited FC contributor Nathan Lee and former FC editor Gavin Smith, two longtime friends, who were eager to assign each other movies. For Gavin, Nathan selected Paul W. S. Anderson’s action-packed 2008 remake Death Race. For Nathan, Gavin chose Larry Cohen’s 1976 apocalyptic sci-fi stunner God Told Me To.

    Devika and Clint were a little less considerate to each other: Clint gifted Devika the toxic 1979 football drama North Dallas Forty, while Devika gifted Clint her childhood favorite, Baby’s Day Out, a madcap live-action cartoon about a sadistic baby running wild in the streets. Movie Gifts, or Movie Torture? Listen to find out.

    MUBI is offering a 30-day free trial for all Film Comment listeners. Get access to the special offer here:
    https://mubi.com/promos/flc?utm_source=film%20at%20lincoln%20center&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=us_mubigo_flcargento_filmcomment

    And be sure to learn more about how you can get a free ticket to a theater each week with MUBI GO, included with your subscription, here:
    https://mubi.com/go/us?utm_source=film%20at%20lincoln%20center&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=us_mubigo_flcargento_filmcomment

    • 56 min
    Top Gun and Nationalist Cinema with Blair McClendon and Ed Halter

    Top Gun and Nationalist Cinema with Blair McClendon and Ed Halter

    Today’s podcast is spurred by something Film Comment Co-Deputy Editor Devika Girish wrote in her dispatch from Cannes a few weeks ago: “the undeniable thrills and pleasures of Top Gun: Maverick … are not entirely separable from the American-exceptionalist fervor of its narrative or the military resources poured into its making. It isn’t “a good film but with bad politics”; it’s a good film in part because of its bad politics.”

    This thought was the catalyst for on ongoing conversation about the questions Tom Cruise’s world-dominating blockbuster raises—about nationalistic movies, star power, and the responsibilities of criticism and cinephilia. So this week, Devika and her fellow Co-Deputy Editor Clinton Krute invited two ideal interlocutors to join the conversation and help pick apart the Top Gun phenomenon: editor and critic Blair McClendon, and Ed Halter, whose brilliant review of the sequel appeared in 4Columns.

    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
185 Ratings

185 Ratings

enelsonpa ,

Keep the marriage stories series going

I loved the Marriage Stories #2 interview. Especially Andrea Janes has a great voice presence and sense of humor. Please keep this hit series going, on different themes of marriage and relationships as viewed across several films.

Tyler Durden 99 ,

GREAT PODCAST!

I just found this and have started listening with the Sundance coverage.

Looking forward to more episodes. So far so good, I love the cast and how varied their opinions are on different aspects of the films.

jonny du ,

See the films?

Ideally films being discussed wud have been watched by the commentators

Top Podcasts In TV & Film

Dear Media
Apple TV+
Vulture & New York Magazine
iHeartPodcasts
Quentin Tarantino & Roger Avary, Stitcher
iHeartPodcasts

You Might Also Like

Indiewire: Screen Talk
Directors Guild of America
Chris O'Falt
MUBI
A24
Filmspotting Network