725 episodes

Investigating every aspect of the food we eat

The Food Programme BBC Radio 4

    • Arts
    • 4.6 • 229 Ratings

Investigating every aspect of the food we eat

    D-Day - The Food that fuelled the assault

    D-Day - The Food that fuelled the assault

    As we mark 80 years since the D-Day assaults, Leyla Kazim gets a peek at what's thought to the be the world's only surviving unopened D-Day ration pack, and explores the food that fuelled the troops through the challenge ahead. She's heading back in time in one Wiltshire village that housed the famous "Band of Brothers" to find out what they were eating.. and she sits down to with two Army veterans to talk about their food memories, getting a taste of a genuine British ration pack along the way.
    Presenter Leyla Kazim
    Producer Tory Pope

    • 42 min
    The BBC Food and Farming Awards 2024: The Search Begins...

    The BBC Food and Farming Awards 2024: The Search Begins...

    Jaega Wise heads to Glasgow to open the nominations for this year's BBC Food and Farming Awards, and to announce that the 2024 ceremony will be held in the city on December 2nd.
    The head judge for 2024 is Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, a long time supporter of the Awards, and there is a brand new award for those championing the best Scottish local produce with a strong connection to their community - BBC Scotland Local Food Hero, which will be judged by Dougie Vipond (Landward & The Great Food Guys) and Rachel Stewart (Out of Doors).
    Another new face on the judging panel is social media star Max La Manna, a low-waste chef, who will be judging the Digital Creator Award.
    On Jaega's mini-tour of Glasgow she visits past winner Matt Fountain from Freedom Bakery, has tea and scones at one of Glasgow's famous tearooms with food journalist Robbie Armstrong, visits the Old Fruitmarket where the Awards will be hosted, and she shares a Pizza Crunch with one of Glasgow's most famous chefs, Julie Lin.
    To see the full list of awards and to nominate, go to bbc.co.uk/foodawards where you can also find the terms and privacy notice.
    Nominations open Friday 7 June at 11am and close 23:59 Sunday 30 June 2024.
    Presented by Jaega Wise
    Produced in Bristol for BBC Audio by Natalie Donovan

    • 42 min
    Danny Trejo: A Life Through Food

    Danny Trejo: A Life Through Food

    Danny Trejo is a Hollywood legend appearing in hundreds of films mostly playing tough guys, convicts and henchmen. He has starred in some of the greatest action films of all time like Con Air with John Malkovich and Nicolas Cage and Heat with Robert De Nero and Al Pacino.
    Life wasn’t easy for Danny growing up. He started taking hard drugs and committing serious crimes from a very young age. He ended up in some of the most violent prisons in America but through finding God and sobriety turned his life around. He became a drugs counsellor and through a series of unlikely events worked his way into Hollywood as an actor.
    At 80 he is also the owner of a chain of taco restaurants as well as a number of food and drink brands. In the programme Jaega meets him in the last branch of Trejo’s Tacos and talks to him about his memories of food growing up, brewing hooch in prison and filming Old El Paso adverts in Mexico.
    We also hear from food historian and writer Chloe-Rose Crabtree about why eating tacos in London has become a thorny issue for Americans and BBC entertainment reporter Colin Paterson on the history of celebrity restaurants.
    Presented by Jaega Wise
    Produced by Sam Grist for BBC Audio in Bristol

    • 41 min
    The Fight to Improve School Food in 2024

    The Fight to Improve School Food in 2024

    Sheila Dillon hears stories of how headteachers are transforming food in their schools in difficult economic conditions, as well as how flagship universal free primary school meal policies in Scotland and London are playing out so far.
    Presented by Sheila Dillon and produced by Sophie Anton for BBC Audio in Bristol.

    • 42 min
    The Hong Kongers finding a new home through food

    The Hong Kongers finding a new home through food

    Jimi Famurewa meets the Hong Kongers who are serving, growing and eating the food of their home country to connect with their own food heritage and find a new sense of belonging.
    Almost 200,000 Hong Kongers have arrived in the UK since a new government visa offered safe passage and the chance of a new life in January 2021. And, as they settle into communities across the UK, including in New Malden, Manchester and Reading, there’s been a noticeable impact on food culture. At Holy Sheep, in Camden, Jimi tastes the spicy rice noodles beloved by this new generation of Hong Kongers, before visiting Hong Kong's most famous organic farmer who relocated and now helps new migrants grow the culturally-significant Choy Sum and other Asian vegetables.
    As he talks to Hong Kongers about the role food has played in settling into the UK, Jimi also finds out how, for some, food has become an act of resistance and a way to express political solidarity. From the so-called 'yellow economy' of pro democracy restaurants and food shops in Hong Kong, to choosing to travel miles to buy ingredients that don't come from China, Jimi starts to realise how food has become more than just a taste of home.
    Produced by Nina Pullman for BBC Audio in Bristol.

    • 42 min
    Posh Nosh: Food's Class Dilemma

    Posh Nosh: Food's Class Dilemma

    How much does what you choose to eat come from what social class you were born into, or identify with now? In this episode, Sheila Dillon takes on the often uncomfortable conversation about social class in the UK, British people's obsession with it, and what it's doing to our health via the way we choose to eat.
    Sheila is joined at an east London pie and mash shop by the food historian Pen Vogler, whose book "Scoff: A History of Food and Class in Britain" charts the way these class markers were established and continue to be upheld. She explains how many foods have moved between classes, and why we pedestal imported foods, including fast foods from America.
    After a 'posh' Afternoon Tea overlooking St Paul’s Cathedral, Sheila heads to the studio to understand more about the impact of these class markers. How has the food industry used these links to sell more food? and what’s being done to break these connections between food and social class?
    Joining her are five guests whose life experiences help illuminate the topic, they are the food campaigner Kathleen Kerridge, TikTok chef Nathan Smith (Grubworks Kitchen), Masterchef judge and food writer William Sitwell, Anna Taylor from The Food Foundation and Dr Maxine Woolhouse, a senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University specialising in food, class and gender.
    So can we ever give these class markers up? Sheila's final visit is to a Community Garden in Hoxton, The Growing Kitchen, where everyone is welcome. Here she meets chairman Tony and member Carmel who share the secrets of their classless community of gardeners and cooks.
    Presented by Sheila Dillon
    Produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Natalie Donovan

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
229 Ratings

229 Ratings

Klingrid ,

Food Awards

So inspiring! So many folks taking leaps of faith to make a better world through the medium of food.

classical_antiquity ,

McDonald’s?

Great program on bitter greens and health. So why is the BBC Food Programme hosting ads from one of the most destructive companies in the world, and the promoter of the least nutritious food in the galaxy, McDonald’s? Are sponsors for healthy food that hard to find? McDonald’s is unsustainable, drives the rampant practice of monoculture, pushes deforestation of the Amazon, and is the cause of so much obesity in the US and the world. Why not get Exxon to sponsor you? Their effect on the world is as bad as McDonald’s. What’s the difference? BBC do better, please. It’s sickening to hear an ad for greasy Big Macs in the middle of a great show about the health benefits of bitter foods. What a bitter pill!

😉💙🙃 ,

12 February 2023

My oven is heated with propane, a very expensive gas. So too, I’m currently looking for a new gas stove, costs run around $1500. new. I’ve always had a slow cooker and microwave, now I’ve added an a air fryer and a pressure cooker, all run on electricity. The monies and time spent is amazingly efficient. I only spent about $50. for each, new, very little in my book and I use them all regularly if not daily. I purchased the ‘Insta Pot’ brand and have been happy with my purchases. Love your pod. Note: Air fryers go up to 11 gallon size…

Top Podcasts In Arts

The Pink House with Sam Smith
Lemonada Media
Fresh Air
NPR
The Moth
The Moth
99% Invisible
Roman Mars
Snap Judgment Presents: Spooked
Snap Judgment
The Magnus Archives
Rusty Quill

More by BBC

Global News Podcast
BBC World Service
6 Minute English
BBC Radio
In Our Time
BBC Radio 4
You're Dead to Me
BBC Radio 4
Newshour
BBC World Service
Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley
BBC Radio 4