56 episodes

The tech-driven disruption of the auto industry cuts across domains, from silicon and software to sensors and AI to smart traffic management and mobility services. Get the chip- to city-scale story in regular interviews with technologists at Siemens and beyond.
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The Future Car: A Siemens Podcast Siemens

    • Technology
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

The tech-driven disruption of the auto industry cuts across domains, from silicon and software to sensors and AI to smart traffic management and mobility services. Get the chip- to city-scale story in regular interviews with technologists at Siemens and beyond.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Better Health and Well Being through Urban Design with Kathryn Firth, Partner FPdesign

    Better Health and Well Being through Urban Design with Kathryn Firth, Partner FPdesign

    The moment you hop on the bus, the subway, or crawl into the back seat of an Uber you probably pull out your phone as it feels like a good time to catch up on emails or scroll through the news. But defaulting to your phone might be depriving you of good conversation or the chance to really observe your surroundings. Social interactions make us happier and are important for our health and well-being. Shutting off our minds and phones for a few minutes to look out the window and better understand our own neighborhoods is important for our health and well-being. While urban design hasn’t always prioritized the social pedestrian experience, it’s something that might be on the cusp of change.
    In the second episode of the Women Driving the Future series, Ed Bernardon interviews Kathryn Firth, Partner at FPdesign and formerly Director of Urban Design at NBBJ Design when the podcast was recorded. Voted the most innovative architectural design firm in 2018 by Fast Company, they specialize in helping clients drive innovation by creating highly productive, sustainable spaces for people to live, learn, work, and play. Today, we’ll learn how urban design is being disrupted to create more pedestrian-friendly environments, what those environments might look like, and how they help to promote social interaction. Ultimately, these changes can make our cities friendlier, more efficient, and more sustainable.
    Some Questions I Ask:
    Are there other goals beyond getting rid of the car? (8:40)How do you figure out the optimal combination of real estate for cars and pedestrians? (11:25)How do you get people to give up their cars? (13:44)How do you accommodate this mixing and matching of the various transportation structures? (16:54)What are the advantages of simultaneous design for vehicles and pedestrians? (19:54)How can we redesign vehicles, so that they're more efficient, more enjoyable? (25:01)
    What You’ll Learn in this Episode:
    What has earned them so much international recognition for innovation (2:52)Why prioritizing pedestrians and cyclists makes better cities (5:16)Why the efficiency of public transportation is the key to pedestrian-friendly areas (14:04)How intentional human-centered design is good for company culture (21:00)Why creating positive catalysts for socialization on public transportation can enhance the experience and decrease stress (24:00)Why underground transportation misses a valuable opportunity (26:44)How the “last mile” factors in to transportation decision making (33:11)
    Connect with Kathryn Firth:
    LinkedInFPdesign
    Connect with Ed Bernardon:
    LinkedInFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software
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    • 36 min
    The End of Parking As We Know It with Anuja Sonalker

    The End of Parking As We Know It with Anuja Sonalker

    A lot of people love to drive, but most of us aren’t as fanatic about that last step of the driving experience. The one that requires operating your vehicle at a snail's pace while you anxiously stalk drivers and pedestrians, attempting to swoop in if any of them approach the driver’s side door or tap their brake lights. Yep, today we’re here to talk about parking. Well, we’re actually talking about NOT parking.  
    What if you never again had to show up late to a meeting or dinner date due to countless minutes spent repetitively circling city blocks for a space to leave your car? What if you never had to miss the start of the movie because you arrived at a full parking lot and had to stash your car 6 blocks away? Wouldn’t it be great if your car could just drop you at the door and magically park itself? 
    In this episode, join Ed Bernardon, host of the Future Car Podcast, and Anuja Sonalker, the CEO of STEER Tech. Her company has created a technology that solves a big problem, a problem that qualifies as one of the greatest “pet peeves” of city dwellers and anyone else who’s ever sat behind the wheel of a car. If we can land people on the moon and accurately detect our percentage of neanderthal DNA, isn’t it about time we figured out a better way to manage parking? 
    In today’s episode, you’ll learn about Anuja’s interesting professional background, and how it eventually led her to founding STEER. Buckle your seat belts and listen in as we talk about a parking technology that could save you time, frustration, and one day eliminate parking from your life forever. 
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What were you doing before starting STEER? (2:57)How did you transition from cybersecurity to autonomous parking (5:55)How does your autonomous parking system work? (9:26)What parking options can the system handle? (11:23)What are some of the partnerships you’ve created? (14:45)What can this technology do for communities? (19:36)How do you test your systems? (32:09)What’s next for STEER? (35:05)
    What You’ll Learn in This Episode:
    An action movie worthy incident that demonstrated the vulnerabilities of technology (4:12)How minimalist engineering helped Anuja recognize that retro-fitting was possible (6:40)How much time you’re really giving up just in order to park your car (12:56)How the nature of parking will change in the future (16:14)How this technology can be applied to existing vehicles (22:12)Why shuttles aren’t the answer (35:49)When you can get your hands on this autonomous technology (39:35)
    Connect with  Anuja Sonalker:
    LinkedInTwitterSTEER Tech website
    Connect with Ed Bernardon:
    LinkedInFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software
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    • 42 min
    Government's Role in Shaping Our Driverless Future with Dan Sullivan

    Government's Role in Shaping Our Driverless Future with Dan Sullivan

    Can you imagine what a driverless world would look like? 
    The more you think about it, the more complicated it gets. Will there be steering wheels, a need for drivers’ licenses, or road rage? Where do you even begin to think about the legalities behind this, and how will government keep up with this rapidly changing world? 
    Luckily, for all the visionaries and entrepreneurs out there, lawmakers have their eyes on the future. 
    In this episode, join Ed Bernardon, host of  the Future Car Podcast, and Daniel Sullivan who shares his experiences and insights on the front lines as the Assistant Director of Policy at the Massachusetts Department of Transportation. He tells us about asset mapping, where and why human drivers are slowing down the developments of autonomous vehicles, how simulations are used to test new autonomous vehicle software, and even what traveling to Fenway Park will be like in 2040. 
    Some Questions I Ask: 
    Tell us how you got involved in government, transportation, and developing autonomous vehicles. (1:26)What are the big target areas where we can apply technology and get the most improvement? (3:40)How do the goals for implementing autonomous vehicles in cities versus states differ? (12:05)What can you do on the infrastructure side to take advantage of autonomous vehicles sooner rather than later? (18:12)With so many different modes of transportation sharing the road, how do you accommodate for each mode and prioritize safety? (25:23)What will riding an autonomous vehicle be like in 2050? (32:25)
    In This Episode You Will Learn: 
    What role asset mapping plays in improving road and general travel conditions. (2:53)What aspects of the future of transportation are most exciting to Daniel. (6:50)How autonomous vehicle services may differ within a city versus on a regional scale. (13:23)How humans are slowing down the integration of autonomous vehicles. (16:54)How simulations are used to model traffic and the “what ifs” of driving in a city. (21:55)How having multiple modes of transportation will provide equitable access to transportation. (26:52)How Daniel would like to see autonomous vehicle development evolve. (31:08)
    Connect with Daniel Sullivan: 
    LinkedIn 
    Connect with  Ed Bernardon:
    LinkedinFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software
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    • 34 min
    From James Bond to the future of our cities: Frank Rinderknecht, CEO Rinspeed, Makes Your Imagination Reality

    From James Bond to the future of our cities: Frank Rinderknecht, CEO Rinspeed, Makes Your Imagination Reality

    Imagination and fantasy are unique to the human experience, and what better way to express these sensibilities than in the autonomous car space? When we think of self-driving cars, the time-saving possibilities are endless. But the convenience factor extends beyond just productivity: these cars could – if we start thinking outside the box – create wonderful new opportunities for socialization or to spend time with A-list virtual celebrities.    
    In this episode of The Future Car podcast, host Ed Bernardon talks to the founder and CEO of Rinspeed, Frank M. Rinderknecht, about his passion and vision for future transportation. They get into Rinspeed’s sQuba underwater car that was inspired by the 1977 James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me and how their more recent car concepts have evolved since. Frank talks about the needs that autonomous cars will satisfy, the extent to which these cars will be dependent on a city’s infrastructure, and what the developments can mean for the delivery of goods and personalized experiences. 
    Tuning into today’s episode, listeners will also hear Frank respond to questions about the biggest engineering challenges (that have nothing to do with engineering!), whether autonomous cars will be able to give everybody what they want, and why he would prefer having a car for every occasion rather than one that does it all.
     
    Some Questions I Ask:How did you get involved in Rinspeed and what drives your passion for future transportation? [01:53]What has been the driving force behind all the innovation in the car concepts? [03:40]What was it like to work on the sQuba project inspired by the 1977 James Bond film? [04:41]How much of the engineering is dedicated to making a water car ‘waterproof’? [07:26]What are the biggest needs that you think autonomous vehicles will satisfy? [10:30]Why is it not possible to have a ‘living room’ interior with a human driver? [14:00]To what degree will the infrastructure of a city interact with autonomous vehicles? [15:30]What do you think about the possibility of pre-selecting the profile of people you want to travel with? [23:16]Won’t it be better for cities to take control of the cars in the case of power outages? [24:51]How do you see goods delivery and infrastructure evolving with autonomous cars? [26:10]What role might autonomous cars play in bringing experiences to people? [31:22]What do you see as the big engineering problems? [32:49]Do you think autonomous vehicles will solve the problem of giving everyone what they want? [35:20]What does the Frank Rinderknecht choice car of the future look like? [37:43] 
    What You’ll Learn in this Episode:The different ways in which Frank’s concept cars evoke emotion. [03:27]Why the underwater sQuba car was truly a one of a kind concept. [04:35]How things that seemed impossible are being realized by technology. [06:47]Why trying to engineer a water car can be compared to serving two masters. [07:59]The kind of things that autonomous vehicles will allow people to do. [10:39]Why vehicles need to operate independently from any outside communication. [16:03]Hear why it is unlikely that mobility will ever be completely uniform. [18:43]The idea that diverse brands will merge to provide a personal in-car experience. [20:47]How transportation might begin to play a more important role in socialization. [23:16]Why you might not want a city to take control of your car. [25:17]The importance of thinking outside the box and questioning old ways of doing. [31:43]Why people – not technology – are the main ‘engineering’ obstacle. [32:55]Why Frank does not wish to imagine a single car that meets all our needs. [37:55] 
    Tweetables:“Elon Musk brought up for, I don’t know, the twentieth time his dream about a diving car. So, it seems that it is still present and I hope Elon does it one day because he will reviv

    • 39 min
    Building an Autonomous Future: Karl Iagnemma

    Building an Autonomous Future: Karl Iagnemma

    Being the first in your field is never an easy hill to climb. Convincing investors that your idea is valid and has potential can often feel like a one-sided conversation. In the world of technology, this is made all the more complicated because the technology required can be so far into the future that it’s nearly impossible for people to conceptualize in the moment. With innovation and lack of imagination being such opposing forces, it takes a lot of courage to pioneer futuristic technology. Autonomous cars? Never. Right...? 
    Join Ed Bernardon, host of The Future Car Podcast, in a discussion with Karl Iagnemma, President and CEO of the Hyundai + Aptiv Autonomous Driving joint venture. His belief in the future capabilities of technology helped fuel today’s thriving autonomous vehicle industry. 
    We discuss his journey from an award-winning fiction writer to earning a Ph.D. at MIT, and how that led to founding nuTonomy in 2013. Karl provides valuable insights on autonomous cars from his diverse experience and talks about the early challenges of being a believer in the future of autonomous vehicles. If you listen to the end we also find time to discuss other important topics on the top of everyone’s mind, including if one day robot cars might fall in love!
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What was the inspiration that drove you to start nuTonomy? (2:06)What were OEMs on the commercial side thinking in the early days of autonomous cars? (4:49)If you look back on your days at nuTonomy, what were the most fun days the most challenging? (8:58)What do you think was key to making you so successful? (11:01)What can you tell us about the differences between deploying something in Las Vegas versus in Singapore? (16:16)What are the plans for ultimately removing the human backup? (22:47)How important is vehicle to vehicle communication going to be for autonomous cars to be successful? (27:12)
    What You’ll Learn in this Episode:
    Why Karl thought he was too late in starting his company back in 2013. (3:28)The early skepticism that surrounded autonomous vehicles (5:54)Karl’s experience as a startup founder (10:22)The joint venture between Aptiv and Hyundai Motor Group (12:00)How the automotive landscape has broadened through technology (14:21)How to plan for the unexpected corner cases a vehicle might encounter (24:30)How an early appreciation for writing influenced Karl’s future career in technology (30:45)
    Connect with Karl Iagnemma:
    LinkedInTwitter
    Learn more about your host Ed Bernardon:
    LinkedinFuture Car: Driving a Lifestyle RevolutionMotorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobilitySiemens Digital Industries Software
    Resources:
    ForbesAptiv
    Recorded December 2019

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    • 34 min
    Modeling, Economists And Predicting The “New Normal”

    Modeling, Economists And Predicting The “New Normal”

    Modeling plays a key role in the development of the future car and in this new pandemic world in which we live. Preventing the spread of this disease permeates everything we do from how we manage our health to how we dine out, and even how we get around - everything is changing. While scientists race to find a vaccine and the world must adapts to a new normal, modeling and simulation help us predict how that new normal will unfold. 
    Putting new systems in place and altering urban infrastructure is costly. Particularly during an economic shutdown, we need to make sure our decisions have the intended effect of keeping us safe as we return to some version of normality. So, what role does modeling play in helping us make those decisions, and who is doing the modeling? Join Ed Bernardon, host of The Future Car Podcast, discover how economists are shaping the models that try to predict the new normal.
    Our guest today is Ashley O'Donoghue, a Ph.D. economist at the Center for Healthcare Delivery Science at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She talks with us about some of the models that are currently being used to help us predict what the new normal might look like. She’ll also help us answer one of life’s great questions: What exactly does an economist do?
    Some Questions I Ask:
    What is the role of an economist in the healthcare sector? (3:02)When do you know your model is good enough? (6:35)Can models help us predict the future? (7:37) What is a “super spreader”? (11:10)Which environments are more likely to create super spreader events? (13:24)
    What You Will Learn:
    What an economist actually does (1:49)What we learn from “causal inference” (3:41)Examples of Natural Experiments in hospitals and what we can learn from data (4:56)What the current models are predicting about transportation (8:54)The unintended side effects of the pandemic in the healthcare sector (9:26)What changes cities are already making to adapt (10:01)
    Learn more about Ashley O’Donoghue:
    LinkedIn
    Twitter
    Super Spreader Study
    Harvard Business Review on Ashley’s Model
    AI in Health Care
    Learn more about your host Ed Bernardon:
    Linkedin
    Future Car: Driving a Lifestyle Revolution
    Motorsports is speeding the way to safer urban mobility
    Siemens Digital Industries Software

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    • 27 min

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8 Ratings

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Informative & Provocative

I love listening to podcasts on road trips and daily commutes, and was happy to have discovered this one. It is definitely part of my stitcher queue now.

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