42 min

The Hardworking History of the Hardy Orange The Feast

    • Food

The Feast is back! And we’re bringing you a few special episodes before the launch of Season 4 on January 7, 2020. Longtime Feast listeners may remember our episode that touched on the history of egg nog and the Virginia hardy orange. The hardy orange is often regarded as a pest, with its bitter taste, numerous thorns, and ability to survive the chilliest of frosts. Introduced by botanists hoping for a way to grow frost-resistant citrus in the United States in the 19th century, the hardy orange has become a common sight in the upper parts of the southern United States. But with a bitter pulp, full of seeds, it’s not exactly a fruit you want to enjoy for breakfast.
Professor Ian Glomski of Vitae Spirits in Charlottesville, Virginia has discovered what may be the perfect solution for this little shrub. Sourcing hardy oranges throughout Virginia, including even a few fruit from Thomas Jefferson’s grave, Glomski has produced a unique hardy orange liqueur, used in bars and restaurants throughout the upper South. On this bonus episode of The Feast, we talked to Ian about how he discovered a delicious way to use this invasive shrub. 

This show is part of The Podglomerate network, a podcast company that produces and distributes exciting new shows.
Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Feast is back! And we’re bringing you a few special episodes before the launch of Season 4 on January 7, 2020. Longtime Feast listeners may remember our episode that touched on the history of egg nog and the Virginia hardy orange. The hardy orange is often regarded as a pest, with its bitter taste, numerous thorns, and ability to survive the chilliest of frosts. Introduced by botanists hoping for a way to grow frost-resistant citrus in the United States in the 19th century, the hardy orange has become a common sight in the upper parts of the southern United States. But with a bitter pulp, full of seeds, it’s not exactly a fruit you want to enjoy for breakfast.
Professor Ian Glomski of Vitae Spirits in Charlottesville, Virginia has discovered what may be the perfect solution for this little shrub. Sourcing hardy oranges throughout Virginia, including even a few fruit from Thomas Jefferson’s grave, Glomski has produced a unique hardy orange liqueur, used in bars and restaurants throughout the upper South. On this bonus episode of The Feast, we talked to Ian about how he discovered a delicious way to use this invasive shrub. 

This show is part of The Podglomerate network, a podcast company that produces and distributes exciting new shows.
Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

42 min

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