89 episodes

Hosts, Andrew, a White dad from Denver, and, Val, a Black mom from North Carolina, dig into topics about race, parenting, and school segregation. With a variety of guests ranging from parents to experts, these conversation strive to live in the nuance of a complicated topic.

The Integrated Schools Podcast Andrew Lefkowits, Val Brown, Courtney Mykytyn

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.8 • 198 Ratings

Hosts, Andrew, a White dad from Denver, and, Val, a Black mom from North Carolina, dig into topics about race, parenting, and school segregation. With a variety of guests ranging from parents to experts, these conversation strive to live in the nuance of a complicated topic.

    Anti-CRT, Book Bans, and A Call to HEAL

    Anti-CRT, Book Bans, and A Call to HEAL

     When the backlash against "CRT" started, we thought it would blow over. It felt as though the attacks were in such bad faith that they didn't even deserve a response. With nearly 35 states at least considering some type of classroom censorship bill, clearly, we were wrong. And yet, the question of what to do about it felt daunting to take on. And then, we found HEAL Together, an initiative from Race Forward. 
    H.E.A.L. (Honest Education Action & Leadership) Together, is building a movement of students, educators, and parents in school districts across the United States who believe that an honest, accurate and fully funded public education is the foundation for a just, multiracial democracy. In addition to serving as a hub to connect organizations across the country already engaged in the fight for educational justice, they also provide tools and trainings so that anyone can become an organizer and lend their voice to this effort. 
    We are joined today by James Haslam (he/him/his), who serves as Senior Fellow at Race Forward leading the HEAL Together Initiative. He shares about his organizing work, and what caregivers can do to push back against bad-faith narratives and act to support a fully funded, honest, accurate public education for all kids.
    LINKS: 

    HEAL Together's Website


    Sign the HEAL Together Pledge


    Register for the HEAL Together Training Series


    James and Cathy Albisa - OpEd in TruthOut


    Rights And Democracy - The organization James founded in New Hampshire

    Southlake Podcast


    White Rage - Dr. Carol Anderson

    Dr. Anderson on our show



    Mother's of Massive Resistance - Dr. Elizabeth McRae


    Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.
    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us podcast@integratedschools.org.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 59 min
    Examining Anti-Blackness: A Multiracial Parent Roundtable

    Examining Anti-Blackness: A Multiracial Parent Roundtable

    Some of the most meaningful episodes we record for this show are the conversations we have with parents and caregivers reflecting on the choices they make for their kids and their own learning journeys. Our last episode with Dr. Chantal Hailey examined the role of anti-Black racism in school preferences across racial identities. One of the themes was the many ways that anti-Blackness shows up in White communities, but also in communities of color. We deeply believe in the power of multiracial dialog and so thought we would pair that episode with a conversation with a multiracial group of parents reflecting on Dr. Hailey’s research.
    We're joined by Dr. Daniella Boyd, a Latina daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants, and Tricia Ebarvia, an Asian American daughter of Filipino immigrants. Through love and a commitment to knowing better and doing better, we explore many of the ways that anti-Blackness shows up for each of us, and in our respective communities. 
    Content warning, particularly for Black listeners, there is discussion of anti-Black racism that can be difficult to hear. This conversation is grounded in love and community, but please take care of yourself. 
    LINKS:

    Dr. Chantal Hailey

    Dr. Hailey's recent research on racial preferences in school choices


    Teaching Hard History - podcast from Learning for Justice


    Just Mercy - Brian Stevenson

    Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.
    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us podcast@integratedschools.org.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Unpacking the Racial Hierarchy in School Choices

    Unpacking the Racial Hierarchy in School Choices

     
    Dr. Chantal A. Hailey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research is at the intersections of race and ethnicity, stratification, urban sociology, education, and criminology. She is particularly interested in how micro decision-making contributes to larger macro segregation and stratification patterns and how racism creates, sustains, and exacerbates racial, educational, and socioeconomic inequality.
    Her recent paper, Racial Preferences for Schools: Evidence from an Experiment with White, Black, Latinx, and Asian Parents and Students uses the New York City High School Admissions Process as a case study to understand how individual choices are shaped by race and racism. Employing experimental and quantitative methods, her study reveals the various ways that the racial demographics of a school influence the perceived desirability of that school across racial identities, as well as for students and their parents.
    She joins Val and Andrew this week to discuss her research and expand the conversation beyond the Black/White binary.
    LINKS:


    Racial Preferences for Schools - Dr. Hailey

    A NY Daily News OpEd about her research


    No Choice is The Right Choice - Dr. Linn Posey-Maddox


    Original research from Chase Billingham and Mathew Hunt on White parents' preferences for schools


    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    The Debrief: Carol Anderson on White Rage

    The Debrief: Carol Anderson on White Rage

    Last episode, Carol Anderson on White Rage, was a lot, so we're taking today's episode to discuss.
    LINKS:

    White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation’s Divide


    We Are Not Yet Equal – a young readers version of White Rage

    One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy

    The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America.


    Eye’s Off The Prize – Dr. Anderson’s 2003 book on the shift from a fight for human rights to civil rights at the NAACP

    Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us.
    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 31 min
    Carol Anderson on White Rage

    Carol Anderson on White Rage

    "Since the days of enslavement, African Americans have fought to gain access to quality education. Education can be transformative. It reshapes the health outcomes of a people; it breaks the cycle of poverty; it improves housing conditions; it raises the standard of living. Perhaps, most meaningfully, educational attainment significantly increases voter participation. In short, education strengthens a democracy."
    Dr. Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and author of White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide, One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy, and The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America. At the core of her research agenda is how policy is made and unmade, how racial inequality and racism affect that process and outcome, and how those who have taken the brunt of those laws, executive orders, and directives have worked to shape, counter, undermine, reframe, and, when necessary, dismantle the legal and political edifice used to limit their rights and their humanity.
    She joins us to discuss her work, in particular, chapter 3 from White Rage - "Burning Brown to the Ground", which looks at the White rage backlash to the Brown v. Board decision, and all of the ways that the progress promised in the decision were undermined both in the immediate aftermath of the decision, and continuing through to today. With a gift for making the illegible legible, Dr. Anderson provides us with a clear eyed look at the history that has led to the widely inequitable education system we have today. And while the topic is heavy, she brings joy and laughter to the conversation in a way that can only leave you smiling through the pain.
    LINKS:

    White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide


    We Are Not Yet Equal - a young readers version of White Rage

    One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression is Destroying Our Democracy

    The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America.


    Eye's Off The Prize - Dr. Anderson's 2003 book on the shift from a fight for human rights to civil rights at the NAACP


    Charles Hamilton Houston - The first general counsel of NAACP


    Plessy v Ferguson (also, listen to our episode about the Plessy case 125 years later).


    Brown II - The implementation decision - "All deliberate speed . . ."


    Dr. Vanessa Siddle Walker - listen to her episode on our podcast.

    Voting Rights Act of 1965

    Shelby County v. Holder


    Mothers of Massive Resistance - Dr. Elizabeth McRea

    Gabriel's Revolt


    The Sum Of Us - Heather McGhee (also, hear her episode on our podcast)


    My Grandmother's Hands - Resmaa Menakem

    The Fisk Jubilee Singers

    Maceo Snipes

    Use these links or start at our Bookshop.org storefront to support local bookstores, and send a portion of the proceeds back to us. 
    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.
    We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    A Framework for Antiracist Education

    A Framework for Antiracist Education

    Founded in 2021, the Center for Antiracist Education’s (CARE) mission is to equip antiracist educators with the knowledge and curriculum to create schools and classrooms that push back on the destructive legacy of racism. Our co-host Val, serves as their academic director in her day job.
    They recently released a framework for antiracist education that provides teachers and school leaders with concrete, actionable steps to take in their journey towards being antiracist. These steps are organized by the five CARE Principles- the core areas that CARE believes require attention in order to move towards antiracism. They are:

    Affirm the dignity and humanity of all people.

    Embrace historical truths.

    Develop a critical consciousness.

    Recognize race and confront racism.

    Create just systems. 

    The framework presents actionable steps related to each principle, with indicators that specify the associated knowledge, skills and behaviors required. And while this framework is designed for teachers and school leaders, the lessons are more broadly applicable, and really serve as a guide to living an antiracist life. 
    We’re joined by CARE Professional Development Specialist, Brittany Brazzel, who contributed to the framework to discuss. 
    LINKS:

    The Framework


    Center for Anti-Racist Education (CARE)

    Clear the Air (twitter)

    Walter Reuther's March on Washington Speech

    Join our Patreon to support this work, and connect with us and other listeners to discuss these issues even further.
    Let us know what you think of this episode, suggest future topics, or share your story with us – @integratedschls on twitter, IntegratedSchools on Facebook, or email us hello@integratedschools.org.
    We are a proud member of The Connectd Podcast Network.
    The Integrated Schools Podcast was created by Courtney Mykytyn and Andrew Lefkowits.
    This episode was produced by Andrew Lefkowits and Val Brown. It was edited, and mixed by Andrew Lefkowits.
    Music by Kevin Casey.

    • 55 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
198 Ratings

198 Ratings

thw local wizard ,

This podcast inspires and challenges me to do better

Thank you, thank you. I’m a white parent who graduated from a global-majority district, where my kids attend school now. Much has changed; much is the same. Fewer white families use the district since I was a student, and black excellence and equity is at the forefront of administrative policy. The education my kids and their fellow students are receiving is enriching, thoughtful, and imperfect. Such is the real, wrought world. When white parents who don’t use the public schools question my decision, or doubt my enthusiasm for public education, I hear it for the historic, coded, fear-based thinking that it is. That is in part thanks to your podcast, which calls out white anxiety and perfectionism, and refuses to excuse complacency. Please keep going.

Djm2516 ,

Reckoning with Plessy

Thank you for sharing this thoughtful conversation with Paula Forbes.

Luvismyrlgn ,

Childcare/ Preschool Center and the treatment of Early Childhood Educators

Can we discuss how we will treat ECE (who are disproportionately BIWOC, immigrants and women) caring for white children for starvation wages ($10/hr in my case) moving forward and how we can ensure these centers are diverse and operated equitably? How will we make these centers affordable for all families? Let’s address this resource hoarding and exploitation, as working in this environment was very dehumanizing, as it’s racist, sexist and classist. Thank you for your time and amazing podcast!

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