584 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 1.2K Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    584: Craig Robinson - The "Must-Have" Qualities For Coaching Excellence, Becoming a Better Listener, Learning From a Legend, and Thanksgiving Dinner With a Young Barack Obama

    584: Craig Robinson - The "Must-Have" Qualities For Coaching Excellence, Becoming a Better Listener, Learning From a Legend, and Thanksgiving Dinner With a Young Barack Obama

    Our new book, The Score That Matters, is a USA Today Best-Seller!
    Buy it here: https://amzn.to/44HucGf
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Craig Robinson is the host of Ways to Win. He’s the executive director of the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC). From 2017-2020, he served as the VP of Player Development for the New York Knicks. Previously, he was a Division I head men’s basketball coach at Oregon State and Brown. He also is the brother of former First Lady Michelle Obama.
    Notes:
    What Craig learned from Coach Pete Carill about recruiting: There is a sales element to it. And one of the most important skills to develop is to become a great LISTENER. Ask questions, listen, and ask more questions. Curiosity is the ultimate form of respect. Coach Carill won over Craig’s dad because he was curious. That’s a good lesson for all of us. President Obama (Craig's brother-in-law) said Craig’s discipline and diligence enhanced his presidential campaign. “Craig doesn’t profess to know the specifics of politics the way he knows the X’s and O’s of basketball, but I think what he does understand is the need to wake up every morning doing your best and having a positive attitude. And him communicating that to me was always very helpful.” When (future President) Barack Obama was dating Craig's sister (Michelle), he told their family at Thanksgiving dinner that he had aspirations and a plan to be the President of the United States. It seemed crazy at the time, but he made it happen. What are the "must-have" qualities to be a coach on Craig's staff? Connect with people Lifelong learning Curiosity Fill in gaps (be strong where Craig is not) Must be a good listener What Craig looked for in a player when recruiting: Baseline talent (table stakes) 2-3 "bucket-getters" High IQ Flexible After graduating from Princeton, where he played for Pete Carril and was twice named the Ivy League player of the year, Criag wanted to coach. Instead, he went to graduate school and succeeded in the financial world, including spending seven years as a vice president at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter. Then, he pivoted away and took an assistant job on Bill Carmody’s staff at Northwestern. That job eventually led Robinson to Brown, where in two seasons he overhauled the program with his work ethic, tough love, and relentless demands on his players. He put a dictionary in the locker room for players to look up the words he used, a tradition that has continued at Oregon State. What made him not immediately go into coaching? Pete Craill telling him to get a real job. It’s amazing the influence the people we look up to can have on us. Craig's fondest memory? January 20, 2009. He went to President Obama's inauguration in Washington D.C. He then flew to a game on the west coast (as the head coach of Oregon State). And received a standing ovation from the visiting team's crowd as he walked out!

    • 1 hr 5 min
    583: Jason Fried - Growing Without Goals, Earning An Investment From Jeff Bezos, Making Tough Decisions, Keys To A Great Partnership, Hosting Leadership Retreats, and Creating A Writing Practice

    583: Jason Fried - Growing Without Goals, Earning An Investment From Jeff Bezos, Making Tough Decisions, Keys To A Great Partnership, Hosting Leadership Retreats, and Creating A Writing Practice

    Our new book, The Score That Matters, is a USA Today National Best-Seller. Buy it here: https://amzn.to/3Qw9Mu0
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Making decisions – Decisions aren't hard — it's the moments after that are. Whenever I make decisions, I don't think about now, I think about eventually. How will this feel then, maybe a year from now. When it's real, not raw. When the complications around the concern have cleared, and distance has done its job. Goal setting - 37 Signals does not set long-term goals. Jason (as the CEO) helps set the direction and they work in six-week sprints. Think, "What am I optimizing for?" 37 Signals does not have a board of directors or advisors. Is it more helpful to have a chip on your shoulder to prove someone wrong or to be motivated to prove your supporters right? Both can be useful. Keys to a great partnership? Jason works with his co-founder, David Heinemeier Hansson (a previous guest on The Learning Leader Show). Mutual admiration Have complementary skills (Jason is design, DHH is engineering) A company is essentially two things: a group of people and a collection of decisions. How those people make these decisions is the art of running a business. Maxims: Decide what you’re going to do this week, not this year. Whenever you can, swap “Let’s think about it” for “Let’s decide on it.” Momentum fuels motivation. Just ship it. You'll figure out what needs to be fixed as you go. Mark Zuckerberg is coming into his own... There are lots of reasons for it. One of them (maybe)? He's working out, in great shape, fighting MMA style, and surrounding himself around others who are doing the same. All leaders should have a writing practice. Hopefully, you don’t feel the need to send it to a lawyer or a comms team before publishing it or sharing it with the people you’re leading. Write like you talk. Write what’s in your head. Think about what you want to say, and say it. You never know who is watching: Jeff Bezos sat in the front row for one of Jason’s keynotes and was so impressed that he asked to invest in his company. When you have the guts to put your thoughts and beliefs out into the world, it can work as a magnetic effect to attract people to you. It's refreshing to hear Jason talk about one of the core qualities he loves most about Jeff: he is overwhelmingly optimistic. The world is built by optimists. You don’t create culture. It happens. A company's culture is a 50-day moving average. It's what you've been collectively doing as a company over the last 50 days. How do you treat people? Who have you hired (or fired) and why? Company off-site events: They do two per year (one in the United States, and one abroad). Members of Jason's team meticulously design them. One day of business followed by time for the team to hang out, do activities together, eat together, and bond. Does Jason have plans to sell 37 Signals? "No, that would be the demise of the company."

    • 1 hr 12 min
    582: Cal Newport - Obsess Over Quality, Create Time Freedom (like Benjamin Franklin), Limit Daily Goals, Work At a Natural Pace, & How To Be So Good They Can't Ignore You

    582: Cal Newport - Obsess Over Quality, Create Time Freedom (like Benjamin Franklin), Limit Daily Goals, Work At a Natural Pace, & How To Be So Good They Can't Ignore You

    Read our book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/44qxsph
    The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Notes on this conversation with Cal Newport
    (Obsess over quality). Jewel obsessed over the quality of her work so much that she turned down a 1m dollar offer (even while living out of her car) because she needed time to make her work excellent. Obsess over the quality of what you produce, even if this means missing opportunities in the short term. Leverage the value of these results to gain more and more freedom in your efforts over the long term. Benjamin Franklin – He hired David Hall to create time freedom. He needed time to think, time to experiment. He gave up money in the short term to gain time freedom to create something for the future. There’s no guarantee that it would pay off, but we all should think about how we can make investments that our future self would thank us for. Have fewer concurrent active projects. Instead of focusing on 10 things, focus on 2 or 3. Make it public. Share with your team. Be known as a leader who focuses on a few important objectives instead of 10 of them.  Match your space to your work – Be in nature, Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote Hamilton in the Morris-Jumel Mansion, the oldest surviving house in Manhattan (served as headquarters for George Washington during the Battle of Harlem Heights, and home of Aaron Burr when he was Vice President), Neil Gaiman built a spartan, 8 sided writing shed that sits on low stilts and offers views on all sides of endless trees. Do Fewer Things: Limit Daily Goals – Cal learned this from his doctoral adviser at MIT. She was incredulous about Cal’s attempts to switch back and forth between multiple academic papers. She preferred to get lost in a single project at a time. Cal was convinced that the slowness of working on just one important thing per day would hold him back. Work at a Natural Pace Don’t rush your most important work. Allow it instead to unfold along a sustainable timeline, with variations in intensity over different timescales, and, when possible, executed in settings conducive to brilliance. Slow productivity emphatically rejects the performative rewards of unwavering urgency. Grand achievement is built on the steady accumulation of modest results over time, and you should give your efforts the breathing room and respect required to make them part of a life well lived, not an obstacle to it. Obsess over Quality By focusing intensely on the small number of activities that matter most to our jobs, you can find both the motivation and justification for slowness. Improve your taste. It’s in the uneasy distance between our taste and our ability that improvement happens – aka in our drive to meet our own high standards. To combat the potential paralysis of perfectionism, think about giving yourself enough time to produce something great, but not unlimited time–focus on creating something good enough to catch the attention of people whose taste you care about but relieve yourself of the need to forge a masterpiece. Gather with people who share similar professional ambitions. When you combine the opinions of multiple practitioners, more possibilities and nuance emerge, and there’s a focusing effect that comes from performing for a crowd. It’s easy to mistake “do fewer things” for “accomplish fewer things” – but this understanding is backward. We work roughly the same number of hours each week regardless of the size of our task lists. Having more commitments simply increases the hours lost to overhead tax – the coordinating activities, such as meetings and email, needed to manage what’s on your plate. The pandemic “zoom apocalypse,” in which many knowledge workers found themselves in Zoom meeting all day long, was caused in part by reaching a state in which overhead tax crowded out almost any time to actually complete tasks. Doing fewer things, in other wo

    • 57 min
    581: Paul Rabil (The LeBron James of Lacrosse) - Never Missing a Day, Goal Setting, The Voice No One Hears, and The Difference Between Self-Promotion & Passion (The Way of The Champion)

    581: Paul Rabil (The LeBron James of Lacrosse) - Never Missing a Day, Goal Setting, The Voice No One Hears, and The Difference Between Self-Promotion & Passion (The Way of The Champion)

    Buy our new book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/44kKLHK
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Never Miss a Day – In the summer, going into Paul's freshman year of high school, he was at a lacrosse camp at Loyola University… At the end of the morning session, an all-time coaching legend, Tony Seaman spoke to the group. He told them he could guarantee that they could earn a college scholarship. All they had to do? "Take 100 shots per day. Here's the catch. You can never miss a day. No excuses." What are your 100 shots a day? Goal Setting – Most people don’t set goals because the act alone is both a major and personal step in the direction of commitment, and it invites hope, fear, and the possibility of regret.  Focus on what you can control – John Wooden was 5’10. Below average for a basketball player. He was really good at “understanding the things at which he had no control and things over which I had some control.” Let Go of Outcomes – Archery master Awa Kenzo told his students to pay no attention to the target. Success and failure come from the same place, so that’s where the archer should point all of their attention: not on the outcome, but the effort. Therapy– Dr. Lindsey Hoskins once said that when we hurt someone we love, it’s because we fear disconnection from that someone. We hope that by lashing out, they’ll show us love, and as a result, we’ll feel safer in the relationship.” The Difference Between Self-Promotion and Passion - "I’m not going to convince you to like what I do. I’m going to show you how much I love what I do.” You won't achieve ambitious goals if you don’t set ambitious goals. The legendary Michael Ovitz shotgun pitch to Coca-Cola. He and his team outworked the competition, flew in a day early, practiced in the actual room the pitch would take place, bought new suits, and over-delivered during the pitch meeting. Their competitors took the meeting for granted, flew in the morning of, and didn't perform. Michael and his team won the $300m contract and earned the business for years to come. A true champion is intensely focused on the things they can control. Being coachable is rare—it’s being curious, eager, self-aware, and ambitious. Discover and harness your unique learning style. What might appear as an inability or perceived disadvantage could be your greatest asset in mastering your chosen field. For example, Paul grew up with a learning difference called Auditory Processing Disorder. The only way to learn from failures is to feel it, study them, make adjustments, a new commitment, and put it behind you. The Voice No One Else Hears – Performance psychologist Jim Loehr has worked with some of the top athletes in the world. He has them wear a microphone during a competition, and he asks them to honestly articulate what the voice in their head says and thinks. Whatever the circumstances, Loehr said he asks, “Is this how I would speak to someone I deeply care about? Or, if I were speaking to someone I deeply cared about, what would I say?” "I've been here before." "I've taken 35,000 shots." Rebound... Bounce back. Paul loves the "up and down" statistic in golf. It refers to a golfer recovering from a bad shot and still making a par on the hole. In life, it's all about how you choose to respond. Paul’s Brother, Mike - “One of my favorite chapters in this book is about planting “little acorns.” (p.174) Had it not been for the biggest acorn in the family, who left his job to build the PLL with me... well, I’d just be a retired athlete, continuing the pursuit of my next professional life. Thank you for everything, Mike.”

    • 55 min
    580: Robin Sharma - The 5 Journal Prompts, 8 Hidden Habits, Meeting People In Person, Working Out Everyday, Becoming The Architect of Your Future, Building a Rich Life

    580: Robin Sharma - The 5 Journal Prompts, 8 Hidden Habits, Meeting People In Person, Working Out Everyday, Becoming The Architect of Your Future, Building a Rich Life

    Read our new book, The Score That Matters - https://amzn.to/3w5K0FW
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    The 5 Journal Prompts - What am I grateful for? Where am I winning? What will I let go of today? What does my ideal day look like? What needs to be said at the end? Avoid the old person flaw – Sometimes you meet an old person and they spend hours in conversation living in the past. Don’t ever believe that your best days are behind you. Have a “never peak” mindset with an upward trajectory… Always. Go see people in person - In Italy they say, “We are not friends until we’ve eaten together.” Release the energy vampires – “We feel guilt when we no longer want to associate with old friends and colleagues who haven’t changed. The price, and marker, of growth.” - Naval Ravikant Stop salting your food before you taste it. Happiness is an inside job. See Solitude as the new status symbol. A sweaty workout is never a silly idea. Ask Yourself the 10,000 Dinner Question: That’s how many dinners you can expect to share with your chosen mate. Does that thought thrill you, or give you the shivers? If the latter, you may not have found the one. Be a Perfect Moment Maker: Focus on making magical memories with those we care about so we feel rich when we’re old. Never be a prisoner of your past. Become the architect of your future. You will never be the same. “Your "I CAN" is more important than your IQ.” “Everything is created twice, first in the mind and then in reality.” “You can’t make someone feel good about themselves until you feel good about yourself.” “Investing in yourself is the best investment you will ever make. it will not only improve your life, it will improve the lives of all those around you.” Start a mastermind alliance… For years, every Friday at 6am, Robin met with his mastermind partner at a coffee shop where they’d chat for 2 hours. “Success occurs in the privacy of the soul.” - Rick Rubin – Success is about YOUR definition, not whatever society says it should be. It’s about understanding your purpose, your values, and the critical behaviors to match those values. The cool part about it, is you get to define it. That isn’t easy work, but it’s worth it. Ski instructors aren’t rich, “but we have a rich life.”

    • 51 min
    579: David Perell - Setting The Standard, Cultivating Your Taste, Pursuing Excellence, Becoming a Sloganeer, Always Working/Never Working, & Lessons From a Mysterious Billionaire

    579: David Perell - Setting The Standard, Cultivating Your Taste, Pursuing Excellence, Becoming a Sloganeer, Always Working/Never Working, & Lessons From a Mysterious Billionaire

    Read our new book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/3VFVYAm
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
    Episode #579: David Perell - Setting The Standard, Cultivating Your Taste, Pursuing Excellence, Becoming a Sloganeer, Always Working/Never Working, & Lessons From a Mysterious Billionaire
    Notes:
    Set the standard – “It’s your job to have the highest quality standards of anybody you work with. Every day, you’ll face pressure to lower them. Don’t do it. If you can set a high standard and simply maintain it, you’ll do very well for yourself.” Have a high-quality bar. Do three things: Define it: Clearly state the standards. (read The 11 Laws of Showrunning) Maintain it: This is hard to do. Raise it: Keep pushing. You need to define what quality looks like. Set the true north. David worked with a coach to establish his core values. And he was going to narrow it down to five and the coach said, “Nope, it’s just one. It’s the one that everything in your life orbits around... It’s The Pursuit of Excellence. The biggest piece of low-hanging fruit for leaders is getting funnier: Nobody trains themselves to get funnier though. It’s strangely taboo. That’s why it’s such an opportunity. "Laughter is the sound of comprehension." Say something memorable. Humor is memorable. A good way to think... Deconstruct something funny. David spends a lot of time understanding why Theo Von is so funny. The key to excellent storytelling: a moment of change. Conflict and suspense carry stories. Robert Caro writing the LBJ books... "What would I see if I was there." He moved to where LBJ lived to see what it was like to be there. How to cultivate taste: Make a list of things you love/hate. Look for things you love (but aren't supposed to), and things you hate (but are supposed to love). Make things. Don't be a passive consumer. Be a connoisseur. Be discerning about what you consume. Amor Tolles - History is bad for knowing what's good now. Consume old things. Museums - Pay attention to what elicits a reaction. Why is it a 10? Why is it a 1? What do you love? What do you hate? Why? Archegos is David's favorite Greek word, and it gets to the heart of good leadership. Four meanings: Author, founder, pioneer, leader America’s founding fathers are the canonical example Lessons from a mysterious billionaire mentor: David asks very specific questions, listens, and takes lots of notes. When meeting with a mentor, show up with energy and specific questions. They are tired of hearing the boring generic questions. Be specific. The mentor talks 98% of the time and David just types what he says. He now has 18,000 words worth of notes. Some lessons: CEOs are Sloganeers: CEOs shouldn’t write strategy memos. They should drive slogans.  Three lines. Three words each. (Bezos: Focus on the Customer) CEOs should tell the same stories over and over again, refining their pitch like a comedian. Gauging reactions Asking questions Listening to push-back Seeing what makes people’s eyes light up Your message is only landing once people start making fun of you. Good goal in life: Always working, never working Story from Patrick O'Shaughnessy. He was asked how much time he spent preparing. Initially, he said, "not much." Then he thought for a while, and said, "I'm preparing all the time. My whole life is preparing to ask these questions."

    • 1 hr 4 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

Peachy GA Teach ,

Reigniting My Passion

I am a teacher dedicated to helping my students reach their fullest potential. I recently transitioned to a new school this year, and the change has been challenging in unexpected ways. The competitive spirit and motivation I once thrived on seemed to dissipate in my new environment, as my administration did not actively seek to push us to excel. Consequently, I found myself becoming complacent and less driven. In this period of mediocrity, I also stopped listening to your podcast, which had been a significant source of inspiration and professional growth for me. However, today I woke up feeling tired of settling for less. I decided to listen to episode 581, and it felt like a jolt of energy and motivation. This podcast reignited the fire within me, reminding me of my passion for teaching and the importance of striving for excellence. I am now ready to push myself and my students to the limit, aiming for growth and excellence in all areas. Your podcast has once again become an essential tool in my journey to becoming the best teacher leader I can be. Thank you for your insightful episodes and for helping people from all walks of life rediscover their drive.

jrradd ,

Go-to leadership podcast

This podcast is the best. Always relevant & helpful information extracted. Ryan is an amazing interviewer. Thank you ❤️

Mr Anthony Wesson ,

Excellent Content

I discovered the show while reading Ryan’s book The Pursuit of Excellence. This is the exact type of podcast I enjoy. I push myself to learn everyday and the guests are great and the conversations flow so well. Thank you for your work and dedication to delivering such a well organized podcast.

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