483 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 1.1K Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    483: Colin O'Brady - Doing The Impossible, Changing Your Mindset, & Crossing Antarctica Alone

    483: Colin O'Brady - Doing The Impossible, Changing Your Mindset, & Crossing Antarctica Alone

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of Mindful Monday. Receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Colin O’Brady 10-time World Record Holder. New York Times bestselling author of The Impossible First. Colin’s highly publicized expeditions have been followed by millions and his work has been featured in the New York Times, The Tonight Show, the BBC, The Joe Rogan Experience, and NBC’s Today. His feats include the world’s first solo, unsupported, and fully human-powered crossing of Antarctica; speed records for the Explorers Grand Slam and the Seven Summits; and the world’s first human-powered ocean row across the Drake Passage. His new book is called The 12 Hour Walk.
    Notes:
    What’s your Everest - The question he asked all the rich bankers that night that none had an answer to? What’s your answer? What are you doing to turn that into a reality? Limiting beliefs - “We are the stories we tell ourselves.” What story are you telling yourself about… Yourself? Life is on a scale of 1 to 10. Most people live most days around a 5 or 6. They don’t have any 1s and they don’t have any 10s. What can you do to change that? How can you live a life that has some 1s and 10s? Mantra: "Colin! You are strong. You are capable." The most important muscle is the brain.  The possible mindset: See the optimism in all opportunities. Colin's mom told him he could achieve anything that he set his mind to. Colin had an accident and caught on fire while jumping a flaming jump rope... His doctor told him that he would probably never walk again. At that moment, Colin set the goal to complete a triathlon. A year later, he WON the Chicago triathlon. With Colin as your guide, The 12-Hour Walk asks you to invest one day in yourself. The goal? Conquering your mind and becoming your best self. By walking alone, unplugging, listening to the voice within, and rewriting the limiting beliefs etched into your psyche, you can break free of the patterns holding you back and learn how to cultivate a “Possible Mindset”—an empowered way of thinking that unlocks a life of limitless possibilities. The reward: being the hero of your own destiny. Question to ask yourself: What is your Everest? What does fulfillment look like? You must take care of yourself first... Excellence: A deep connection with your why. PASSION. Genuine curiosity Love If no one was watching, would you still do it?

    • 58 min
    482: Neal Foard - Becoming More Persuasive, Telling Better Stories, & Changing Your Mind...

    482: Neal Foard - Becoming More Persuasive, Telling Better Stories, & Changing Your Mind...

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with 10's of thousands of other Learning Leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Neal Foard has spent more than 20 years creating award-winning ad campaigns for clients on four continents. From the experience of thousands of presentations to clients all over the world, Neal has created The Passionate Logic Project™ to help business leaders sell their agendas more persuasively. He has been a featured speaker at TED and is recently known for his TikTok videos which have been viewed millions of times over the past few months.
    "There's nothing wrong with us that can't be fixed by what's right with us." The EQ of the gym bro – When someone is new on your team, ask them to help you out. Find a way to include them. Get them an early win. Make them feel part of the team as soon as possible. The element of mystery – Have an aha moment. Don’t spoil the punchline. Save the reveal for the end… Remember the Whitney Houston story? Your first words of a presentation or a meeting are the most valuable real estate you have. Don’t waste them. Be thoughtful. Practice. Don’t tell them “I’m so excited to be here…” Launch with intrigue, with movement, with a story… How To Use Power – “The thing that gave him more joy than anything was using power to make life more amazing for his team, make you feel like you mattered to him.” – “All business is personal. The best business is very personal.” - Rick Lenz Data is a tool - Our first use of it should be to make people smile. – Your family trip to Disney World… What happened? The Physics of a Bright Smile – The most important decision you can make is to be in a good mood. - Voltaire What Motivates people: Lillian Moore shares a quick story that reveals what really motivates people: "A few months after my husband and I moved to a small Massachusetts town I grumbled to a resident about the poor service at the library, hoping she would repeat my complaints to the librarian. The next time I went to the library, the librarian had set aside two bestsellers for me and a new biography for my husband. What's more, she appeared to be genuinely glad to see me. Later I reported the miraculous change to my friend. "I suppose you told her how poor we thought the service was?" I asked. "No," she confessed. "In fact—I hope you don't mind—I told her your husband was amazed at the way she had built up this small-town library, and that you thought she showed unusually good taste in the new books she ordered." Source: Reader's Digest (Similar to Neal's coffee story. “Puuuurfect”) Begin each story with a vague suggestion that there's a lesson to be learned by the end... Steve Martin - Do NOT begin a talk with, "Hey, how's everybody doing?" A leader's job is to facilitate their people's best work. Presentations: Do not read bullet points. If you do that, you're just passing along information. You need to attach emotion to it. How to be more persuasive? Be willing to listen and open to changing your mind. Send the signal to them that we can do it. We're not there to win. The power of listening is underrated. Learn what does and doesn't matter to them. "People don't change their minds unless they want to."

    • 1 hr 10 min
    481: Eric Barker - The Surprising Science About Building Excellent Relationships (Plays Well With Others)

    481: Eric Barker - The Surprising Science About Building Excellent Relationships (Plays Well With Others)

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." Receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Eric Barker is the author of The Wall Street Journal bestseller “Barking Up the Wrong Tree,” which has sold over half a million copies and been translated into 19 languages. It was even the subject of a question on “Jeopardy!” Over 500,000 people have subscribed to his weekly newsletter. His work has been covered by The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Financial Times, and others. Eric is also a sought-after speaker, having given talks at MIT, Yale, Google, the United States Military Central Command (CENTCOM), and the Olympic Training Center. His latest book is called “Plays Well with Others."
    Love – Casanova said, “love is three-quarters curiosity.” That curiosity creates deep knowledge… And that helps you build what researcher John Gottman calls, a “love map.” “Everyone asks how you got together; nobody asks how you stayed together. And it’s the latter that is often the real achievement to be proud of.” Your WHO: Take your health, for example. The Framingham study showed that drinking, smoking, and obesity are all quite contagious. If someone you consider a friend becomes obese, your likelihood of obesity increases by 53%. And if the friendship is mutual, the number rises to 171%. "Friends are only there because you want them to be." "Friends make us happier than any other relationship." How to build deeper relationships with friends? Time Be vulnerable -- "Relationships move at the speed of vulnerability." How to make your relationship with your partner better? Do exciting things together - Be proactive Leverage emotional contagion - Associate feelings with events Bill Perkins - "Create memory dividends." You need to learn and grow together John Gottman asks couples to tell their stories... The ones that stick together celebrate the difficulties Profiling - “Humans are prone to seeing meaning when there is none.” There’s a fundamental reason that astrologers outnumber astronomers. Emotionally we want a feeling of control over the world around us. We desperately need the world to at least seem to make sense. And for that, we need a story, even if it isn’t true. Confirmation bias: what is it? And what are the 3 ways to resist it? Feel accountable Distance before decision Consider the opposite Lying — how can you spot a liar?  The average college student lies in about a third of conversations. For adults, it’s 1 in 5. In online dating, 81% of profiles deviate from the truth. And we are terrible at detecting lies, averaging a 54% success rate. So how do we become better at understanding if someone is lying? This system takes patience (so it isn’t useful for little lies but can be powerful for bigger issues). “The science overwhelming recommended a nuanced and sophisticated method humans have never tried in the past 5,000 years when attempting to detect lies: being nice. Never be a bad cop, be a friendly journalist. You have to get them to like you. To open up. To talk a lot. And to make a mistake that reveals deception. Don’t accuse. Be curious. Optimism – Shawn Achor’s Ted Talk (so funny and fast). MET Life saw such great results among happy salespeople that they tried an experiment: they started hiring people based on optimism. It turns out that the optimistic group outsold their more pessimistic counterparts by 19% in year one and 57% in year two. "Writing a book is like telling a joke and having to wait two years to know whether or not it was funny." —ALAIN DE BOTTON Eric writes to start his new book... Henry Thomas Buckle once said: “Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people.” I’m here to discuss people. Leveraging the best evidence avai

    • 49 min
    480: Seth Godin - Becoming A Great Storyteller, Fixing PowerPoint Presentations, & Defining Leadership

    480: Seth Godin - Becoming A Great Storyteller, Fixing PowerPoint Presentations, & Defining Leadership

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with 10's of thousand of other learning leaders, will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week of right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Leaders have nothing in common. They don’t share gender or income level or geography. There’s no gene, no schooling, no parentage, no profession. In other words, leaders aren’t born with it. Actually, they do have one thing in common. "Every tribe leader I’ve ever met shares one thing: the decision to lead. Leadership is a choice." Great Stories – Great stories are rarely aimed at everyone. Average people are good at ignoring you. Average people have too many different points of view about life and average people are by and large satisfied. If you need to water down your story to appeal to everyone, it will appeal to no one. The most effective stories match the world view of a tiny audience—and then that tiny audience spreads the story. Really Bad PowerPoint  - Powerpoint could be the most powerful tool on your computer. But it’s not. Countless innovations fail because their champions use PowerPoint the way Microsoft wants them to, instead of the right way. Communication is the transfer of emotion. make slides that reinforce your words, not repeat them. Create slides that demonstrate, with emotional proof, that what you’re saying is true not just accurate. Talking about pollution in Houston? Instead of giving me four bullet points of EPA data, why not read me the stats but show me a photo of a bunch of dead birds, some smog, and even a diseased lung? This is cheating! It’s unfair! It works. Define Brand – Seth's definition: A brand is the set of expectations, memories, stories, and relationships that, taken together, account for a consumer’s decision to choose one product or service over another. Linchpin — the combination of passion and art is what makes someone a linchpin. Gifts — there are 2 reasons to give gifts. One is reciprocity. You give so that someone feels like they owe you something. That is manipulative and no way to build a career. The second reason is fascinating. Gifts allow you to make art. Gifts are given with no reciprocity hoped for or even possible. The paintings of Chuck Close - the gift he gives with no possibility of reciprocity gives him room to be in charge. Room to find joy. Because when he’s painting he’s not punching a time clock or trying to please someone who bought his time. He’s creating a gift. My fundamental argument is simple. In everything you do, it’s possible to be an artist, at least a little bit. “How To Be Remarkable” Remarkable doesn’t mean remarkable to you. It means remarkable to me. Am I going to make a remark about it? If not, then you’re average, and average is for losers. It's not really as frightening as it seems. They keep the masses in line by threatening them (us) with all manner of horrible outcomes if we dare to step out of line. But who loses their jobs at the mass layoffs? Who has trouble finding a new gig? Not the remarkable minority, that's for sure. Lost in all the noise around us is the proven truth that creativity is the result of desire. A Desire to solve an old problem, a desire to serve someone else. It’s not a bolt of lightning from somewhere else... The difference between talent and skill: Talent is something we’re born with: it’s in our DNA, a magical alignment of gifts. Skill is earned. It’s learned and practiced and hard-won. It’s insulting to call a professional talented. In the words of Steve Martin, “I had no talent. None.” If you want to change your story, change your actions first. We become what we do. Practical Empathy -- “We have to be able to say, ‘it’s not for you’ and mean it. The work exists to serve someone, to change someone, to make something bette

    • 52 min
    479: David Rubenstein - Interviewing Billionaires, Using Humor To Connect, & The Future Of America

    479: David Rubenstein - Interviewing Billionaires, Using Humor To Connect, & The Future Of America

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with 10's of thousand of other learning leaders, will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week of right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Guest: David M. Rubenstein is Co-Founder and Co-Chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest and most successful private investment firms. Established in 1987, Carlyle now manages $325 billion from 26 offices around the world. David is the host of The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations on Bloomberg TV and PBS and Bloomberg Wealth with David Rubenstein on Bloomberg TV; and the author of The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians, a book published by Simon & Schuster in 2019, How to Lead: Wisdom from the World's Greatest CEOs, Founders, and Game Changers, a book published in 2020, and The American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream, a book published in 2021.
    Notes:
    How David defines success - “Other people tell you that what you’ve done is useful. They admire you. And you help people.” David's goals: Don't do anything to get in public trouble Give away the bulk of his money 4 Key Decisions David made that helped him: Going to law school Working in the Carter White House Starting the Carlyle Group Becoming a philanthropist Why The Carlyle Group? "I fell in love with building something from scratch." "Great ideas don't come from people who are busy." Why does David enjoy interviewing leaders? It gives him an opportunity to follow his intellectual curiosity How does he prepare for his interviews? Reads their books Gets help from a research assistant Digests all the material Writes questions Looks for humor opportunities Humor breaks the tension and produces a common bond "John Kennedy had a great sense of humor." David has lent his home in Nantucket to President Biden. Benjamin Franklin said, "it's a republic if you can keep it." Republics are not easy to keep. David had the opportunity to invest in Facebook when Mark Zuckerberg was in college... But he said no. The keys to the Wright Brother's Success -- Tons of books in their house growing up Their inquisitive nature Their passion to prove a point Commonalities of excellent leaders: Vision Determination - must walk the walk Influence others Communication skill Humility Highly ethical Doesn't need all the credit Higher goals than just money “Persist – don’t take no for an answer. If you’re happy to sit at your desk and not take any risk, you’ll be sitting at your desk for the next 20 years.” "What do most people say on their deathbed? They don't say, 'I wish I'd made more money.' What they say is, 'I wish I'd spent more time with my family and done more for society or my community." "Moneymaking was never anything to me. I was happy never making money; I just was happy doing things I liked. But I fell into the money thing. I now don't feel guilty about it, but I am determined to give away the bulk of it and enjoy doing it." "Anybody who gives away money is mostly looking at things where they think they can make a difference. I'm trying to help people who helped me, educational institutions that helped me with scholarships, or organizations that were very useful to me in growing up." "It's clear to me that when you do private equity well, you're making companies more efficient and helping them grow and become more profitable. That success means our investors - such as public pension funds - benefit, which contributes to the economic wealth of society." "I regard food as fuel. I am not a brunch person." Life and Career advice: Find something you enjoy Experiment Read Keep an open mind

    • 59 min
    478: Susan Cain - Using Pain To Be More Creative, Finding The Right Life Partner, & A New Way To Think About Death

    478: Susan Cain - Using Pain To Be More Creative, Finding The Right Life Partner, & A New Way To Think About Death

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You along with 10's of thousands of other learning leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right!
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Susan Cain is the #1 bestselling author of Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole and Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, which spent eight years on The New York Times best-seller list, and has been translated into 40 languages. Susan’s TED talks have been viewed over 40 million times. LinkedIn named her the Top 6th Influencer in the World, just behind Richard Branson and Melinda French Gates. Susan partners with Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, and Dan Pink to curate the Next Big Idea Book Club.
    Notes:
    "Compassion means to suffer together." How to use sadness? "Make the pain your creative offering." To suffer with other beings brings people together. When people are grieving the loss of a loved one, they often want to talk about that person. Aristotle wondered why the great poets, philosophers, artists, and politicians often have melancholic personalities… his question was based on the ancient belief that the human body contains 4 humors: each corresponding to a different temperament - melancholic (sad), sanguine (happy), choleric (aggressive), and phlegmatic (calm). Joseph Campbell said, “We should strive to participate joyfully in the sorrows of the world.” Connecting with what matters and taking committed action—moves us from bitter to sweet, from loss to love.” Everyone experiences loss. It is part of the human condition. How have you moved “from bitter to sweet, from loss to love”? Are there coping strategies you recommend? The bittersweet quiz — 1-10. If you scored between 5.8 and 10, you’re a true connoisseur of bittersweetness: the place where light and dark meet. Questions: Do you tear up easily at touching TV commercials? Are you especially moved by old photographs? Do you react intensely to music, art, or nature? Have others described you as an old soul? Do you find comfort or inspiration on a rainy day? Are you moved to goosebumps several times a day? Do you feel elevated by sad music? Do you tend to see the happiness and sadness in things, all at once? Do you seek out beauty in your everyday life?" (I scored a 7.1) “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “There's zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.” “If we could honor sadness a little more, maybe we could see it—rather than enforced smiles and righteous outrage—as the bridge we need to connect with each other. We could remember that no matter how distasteful we might find someone’s opinions, no matter how radiant, or fierce, someone may appear, they have suffered, or they will.” “The secret that our poets and philosophers have been trying to tell us for centuries, is that our longing is the great gateway to belonging.” “The tragedy of life is linked inescapably with its splendor; you could tear civilization down and rebuild it from scratch, and the same dualities would rise again. Yet to fully inhabit these dualities—the dark as well as the light—is, paradoxically, the only way to transcend them. And transcending them is the ultimate point. The bittersweet is about the desire for

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

Witty Stitches Eye Patches ,

Story Telling

I’ll never tell a story the same way again. Great conversation with Neal Foard.

saradoane ,

love it!

incredible conversations

RJones9@ ,

Awesome

Ryan Hawk is the best “question asker” out there. Phenomenal at his craft. Incredible preparation for each guest. A tremendous opportunity to learn each and every episode.

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