473 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 1.1K Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    473: Ed Mylett - Building Confidence, Asking The Right Questions, & Maxing Out Your Life (The Power Of One More)

    473: Ed Mylett - Building Confidence, Asking The Right Questions, & Maxing Out Your Life (The Power Of One More)

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of Mindful Monday. You, along with 10's of thousands of learning leaders from all over the world will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday Morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Ed Mylett is a globally recognized entrepreneur, coach, and speaker. He started in the financial services industry, eventually earning a spot on the Forbes 50 Wealthiest Under 50 List. Since then, he has spearheaded a range of ventures, spanning technology, real estate, health, nutrition, and more. Ed is the best-selling author of #MaxOut Your Life, and the new book The Power of One More. He has grown his online audience to more than 3 million followers in just four years. Ed also regularly inspires audiences ranging from small gatherings to mega-venues of 50,000+ attendees, and online audiences in the hundreds of thousands. 
    Notes:
    Self-confidence is about keeping promises to yourself. And surrounding yourself with people who live at a higher temperature. You become what they are. You think differently, act differently, and will achieve different results based on your inner circle. "Link your confidence to your intention." Excellence = high standards. People who sustain excellence expect more from themselves. They’re prepared for big moments. Their habits, routines, and rituals enable them to perform at a high level each day. And they keep raising their standards. Isn’t that the type of person we want to be? Definition of leadership – “As I define it, you are a One More leader if you help people do things they would not otherwise accomplish without your presence.” - Ed Mylett The six basic needs that drive people: Certainty, Uncertainty and Variety, Significance, Love & Connection, Growth, and Contribution. Many people think they’ve got to make several huge changes to improve their lives and achieve their goals. This common misconception works as a barrier instead of a motivator.  And as a result, people never start making changes, or quickly give up, never fulfilling their potential. The One More philosophy is built on two main premises. First, you don’t need to make dozens of big changes to achieve significant growth or change. Often, important changes take place as the result of doing one more thing. Second, the One More philosophy is about combining thinking and doing. We often do one or the other and assume that’s enough. But it’s not until you combine those two that you’ll start to see profound changes in your life. "My dad was an alcoholic when I was young. It wasn’t until my mom gave him a One More ultimatum that he got sober. For the last 35 years of his life, he devoted himself to helping others with alcohol addiction, almost until the day he died, making the most of the One More chance he’d been given.  He passed away a little over a year ago, and his death was also a reminder to reach out and spend as much time as you can with the people you love because if you don’t, you’ll regret not having one last One More with that person when they’re gone." The questions you ask yourself directly reflect what you think about. When you don’t think about the right things, you’ll ask yourself questions that don’t advance the quality of your life. Better questions lead to better answers, and better answers lead to a better life. Asking tough questions can be uncomfortable but doing so eventually leads you to the best answers although they may be difficult for you to address. Facing these answers empowers you to remove roadblocks that have been holding you back from your best One More life. Goals & Standards - Many people often confuse goals and standards, thinking they’re the same thing. They are not! Although goals are important, standards determine whether you’ll reach your goals or not. The proper standards create a framework that feeds in

    • 53 min
    472: Jimmy Soni - An Indispensable Guide To Innovation, Curiosity, & Leadership (The Founders)

    472: Jimmy Soni - An Indispensable Guide To Innovation, Curiosity, & Leadership (The Founders)

    Text Hawk to 66866 for Mindful Monday... A carefully curated email sent to you every Monday to help you start your week right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Jimmy Soni is an award-winning author. His book, A Mind at Play: How Claude Shannon Invented the Information Age, won the 2017 Neumann Prize, awarded by the British Society for the History of Mathematics for the best book on the history of mathematics for a general audience, and the Middleton Prize by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. His book, Jane’s Carousel, completed with the late Jane Walentas, captured one woman’s remarkable twenty-five-year journey to restore a beloved carousel in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Jimmy's most recent book is called, The Founders - The Story of PayPal and the Entrepreneurs Who Shaped Silicon Valley. 
    Notes:
    “Your life will be shaped by the things you create, and the people you make them with. We tend to sweat the former. We don't worry enough about the latter." The founders and earliest employees of PayPal pushed and prodded and demanded better of one another. Instead of "Acknowledgements" to end his book, Jimmy titled the section "Debts" "A debt is deeper than an Acknowledgement." Envy the optimist, not the genius. There’s real power in optimism. The world is built by optimists. Look for the silver things. Have belief. Be the type of person that believes in themselves and others… Optimism builds confidence in yourself and others. Be an optimist. Phil Jackson and Michael Jordan – The fact that Phil told the best player in the world… “We aren’t going to win a championship if you keep playing that way. You have to buy into the triangle offense.” It shows the value of a friend (or a coach) telling you the truth in order to help you (and the team) get better. "Walter Isaacson made me believe in its (the book) importance and potential. At the very end, he provided the kind of advice that can only come from someone who has spent years laboring in the same fields. Peter Thiel refined Max Levchin's thinking... He made him better. Ask, "Have you thought about it this way?" Watch Jiro Dreams of Sushi Kobe Bryant was an incredible learning machine. His insatiable curiosity made him better. You can become curious about anything. Mr. Beast spent hours every day on Skype with his friends talking about how to grow a YouTube channel. We live in a moment were you can connect with others who are passionate about the same topics you are. With the internet, you can connect with anyone. Qualities of the leaders who created PayPal: It was so hard. They all experienced failure and bounced back. Highly intelligent. Hard-working. They worked 7 days a week. There was no work-life balance. They weren't just resilient, they were fast-moving. Life Advice: What looks like expertise on the outside is generally messiness on the inside. Leadership in Solitude. There are benefits to spending some time by yourself. Ask – The people who make things happen are willing to ASK. Steve Jobs to Bill Hewlitt. Elon Musk to Dr. Peter Nicholson. Those "asks" changed the trajectory of their lives. Who knows, maybe your next ASK will change yours… Claude Shannon, Bell Laboratories, renowned as an incredible hub of innovation…  whose work in the 1930s and ’40s earned him the title of “father of the information age.” Geniuses have a unique way of engaging with the world, and if you spend enough time examining their habits, you discover the behaviors behind their brilliance.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    471: Steve Magness - Why We Get Resilience Wrong & The Surprising Science Of Real Toughness (Do Hard Things)

    471: Steve Magness - Why We Get Resilience Wrong & The Surprising Science Of Real Toughness (Do Hard Things)

    Text Hawk to 66866 to receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Steve Magness is a world-renowned expert on performance, co-author of Peak Performance: Elevate Your Game, Avoid Burnout, and Thrive with the New Science of Success and The Passion Paradox: A Guide to Going All In, Finding Success, and Discovering the Benefits of an Unbalanced Life, and the author of The Science of Running: How to Find Your Limit and Train to Maximize Your Performance. His new book is called Do Hard Things.
    Notes:
    “The best aren’t concerned with being the best. They’re concerned with being the best at getting better.” Confidence: Confidence needs evidence. Acting with bravado we haven't earned only works on easy things. It backfires on anything truly challenging. Doing difficult things, even if you don't quite succeed at them, is how you develop real confidence. How do you find a good mentor? Do interesting things. Be open to learning and guidance. Be motivated, driven, and curious about something. Put your ego aside. Do good, quality work. The difference between real and fake toughness. Fake toughness is easy to identify. It’s Bobby Knight losing control and throwing tantrums in the name of “discipline.” It’s the appearance of power without substance behind it. Researchers out of Eastern Washington set out to explore the relationship between leadership style and the development of toughness. After conducting research on nearly two hundred basketball players and their coaches, they concluded, “The results of this study seem to suggest that the ‘keys’ to promoting mental toughness do not lie in this autocratic, authoritarian, or oppressive style. It appears to lie, paradoxically, with the coach’s ability to produce an environment, which emphasizes trust and inclusion, humility, and service. Sustained Excellence: Observation: the people who sustain success over the long haul are rarely shooting for success. They are focused on the path. Their goal is mastery, which knows no end. What characteristics do the best performers have? Don't get tired of the boring stuff Masters of compartmentalization Can flip the switch Know how to lose well Cultivate perspective Delayed gratification Drive from within Creating an enemy: Whenever an organization, group, or individual works hard to create an enemy to pit their idea/group against, it's a sign you probably shouldn't listen. Us vs. Them is the easiest way to exploit human nature, to get people on your side. It often means there's no substance there. The best way to get the most out of someone is to make them feel secure enough that they can take risks and fail. Most of us don't reach our potential because we default to protective mode. Threatening & demanding makes us protect further. Security and belonging frees us up. “Growth comes at the point of resistance. Skills come from struggle.” “The fact is that often coaches figure out what works in training and then the scientists come in later and explain why it works.” What can we learn about success and performance from Eliud Kipchoge?
    He is not fanatical about trying to be great all the time. He is consistent & patient. His coach says that the secret is that he makes progress “slowly by slowly.” Motivation + Discipline = Consistency He told The NY Times, "He estimates that he seldom pushes himself past 80 percent — 90 percent, tops — of his maximum effort when he circles the track." "I have a mindset whereby I am a human being. I am walking around as a human being. I learn to perform well at the same time being grounded. And I trust that being humble and being on the ground is the only way to concentrate" "You cannot train alone and expect to run a fast time. There is a formula: 100% of me is nothing compared to 1% of the whole team. And

    • 1 hr 5 min
    470: Daniel Coyle - Building Your Culture, Solving Hard Problems, & Winning The Learning Contest

    470: Daniel Coyle - Building Your Culture, Solving Hard Problems, & Winning The Learning Contest

    Text Hawk to 66866 for "Mindful Monday." It's a carefully curated email to help you start your work off on a high note.
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Daniel Coyle is the New York Times bestselling author of The Culture Code, which was named Best Business Book of the Year by Bloomberg, BookPal, and Business Insider. Coyle has served as an advisor to many high-performing organizations, including the Navy SEALs, Microsoft, Google, and the Cleveland Guardians. His other books include The Talent Code, The Secret Race, The Little Book of Talent, and Hardball: A Season in the Projects, which was made into a movie starring Keanu Reeves. Coyle was raised in Anchorage, Alaska, and now lives in Cleveland Heights, Ohio, during the school year and in Homer, Alaska, during the summer with his wife Jenny, and their four children.
    Notes:
    Purpose isn’t about tapping into some mystical internal drive but rather about creating simple beacons that focus attention and engagement on the shared goal. Successful cultures do this by relentlessly seeking ways to tell and retell their story. To do this, they build what you call “high-purpose environments.” High-purpose environments are filled with small, vivid signals designed to create a link between the present moment and a future ideal. They provide 2 simple locators that every navigation process requires: Here is where we are and Here is where we want to go. "The world we live in is a learning contest." Deep fun = Solving hard problems with people you admire. Schedule regular team “tune-ups” to place an explicit spotlight on the team’s inner workings and create conversations that surface and improve team dynamics Foster strong culture in remote working scenarios. It doesn’t take much physical togetherness to build strong teams. Encourage remote teams meet up in person twice a year Create belonging: every group knows diversity, equity, and inclusion matter, but what separates strong cultures is they aim to create belonging across racial lines. Ex: normalize uncomfortable conversations; read, watch, reflect together; gather data and share it • Build Trust. Ask the magic-wand question to each member of your team: if you could wave a magic wand and change one thing about the way we work, what would it be? Connect. Hold an anxiety party to serve as a pressure-relief valve, as well as a platform for people to connect and solve problems together. Change perspective. Have a once-a-week catch-up session with someone outside of your group. Make it safe to talk about mistakes: Strong cultures seek to highlight and remember their mistakes and learn from them • Listen. Listening to others’ problems is one of the most powerful culture-building skills on the planet. It’s also difficult. Restrain yourself from jumping in, listen, then say: Tell me more. Embrace the After-Action Review (or as the military calls it, the AAR): Talking together about the strengths and weaknesses of your performance will make your group better. The Billion Dollar Day When Nothing Happened – “These Ads Suck." That was the note that Larry Page wrote and hung up about Google Ad Words. What did Jeff Dean, a quiet, skinny engineer from Minnesota, do to make the ads not suck? He had no immediate need to fix the problem. He worked in Search (a different area of the company. And how did Jeff Dean respond when he was asked about it years later (he said he didn’t even really remember it. It was just normal to do stuff like that)... There is a misconception that great cultures are places that are always happy. Doing great work is hard. The way we build great cultures is by doing hard things together focused on connection and safety. Life/Career advice: Think of your life in experiments and the learning loop. It is Experience + Reflection. Experience + Reflection. WRITE DOWN WHAT you’ve learned from your experiences. Writing creat

    • 1 hr 15 min
    469 - Jim Weber - Outpacing Goliath, Impressing Warren Buffet, & Leading With Purpose

    469 - Jim Weber - Outpacing Goliath, Impressing Warren Buffet, & Leading With Purpose

    Text Hawk to 66866 for "Mindful Monday." A carefully curated email sent each Monday morning to help you start your week off right!
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12  https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Jim Weber joined Brooks Running Company as CEO in 2001 and is credited for the Seattle-based running company’s aggressive turnaround story. The business and brand success caught the attention of Warren Buffett, who declared Brooks a standalone subsidiary company of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. in 2012. He’s the author of a new book called, “Running With Purpose, How Brooks Outpaced Goliath Competitors to lead the pack.”
    Notes:
    A purpose is a forever cause that can permeate everything from the business to the brand to the culture. It is a choice, not an outcome. The secret to success is “constancy of purpose” - Instead of a mission statement, Jim decided that a purpose was preferable to a mission. A purpose is a forever cause that can permeate everything from the business to the brand to the culture. The riskiest path is to look like your competitors. You can't just chase trends. They have distinct points of view: Focus Excellence in execution Trust: Charlie Munger has often spoken about the “seamless web of deserved trust” as a life pursuit. The Berkshire culture is built on trust Brooks is completely empowered Brooks is completely accountable There are no required meetings People choose to self-select into it "You're an outcome of your journey." What Jim looks for when hiring a leader: Competitive Culture driven - "Cultures are behaviors in action." Likes being part of a team Functional excellence Values: Word is bond Be active Authenticity The process Jim has in place to continue learning: He was involved in YPO in the early years His wife Mary Ellen A board of advisors - It's 6 former CEOs The one-page strategy that you relentlessly message to your team – Jim made the decision to walk away from non-premium running to concentrate on performance-running, eliminating 50% of his product line and 40% of his retail partnerships. He didn’t try to be all things to all people. Expectations and Messaging: After becoming CEO, Jim lowered revenue and profit projections so that he could establish some credibility by hitting his numbers. He brought in a new CFO, David Bohan… He shared a one-page strategy and told everyone they would get sick of you repeating it.  

    • 1 hr 6 min
    468 - Vanessa Van Edwards - The Secret Language To Charismatic Communication (Cues)

    468 - Vanessa Van Edwards - The Secret Language To Charismatic Communication (Cues)

    Text Hawk to 66866 for "Mindful Monday." A carefully curated email you'll receive each Monday to help you start your week off right.
    Full shownotes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Vanessa Van Edwards is the Lead Investigator at Science of People. She is the bestselling author of Captivate: The Science of Succeeding with People, translated into 16 languages. More than 50 million people watch her engaging YouTube tutorials and TEDx Talk. Vanessa works with entrepreneurs, growing businesses, and trillion-dollar companies; and has been featured on CNN, BBC, CBS Mornings, Fast Company, Inc. Magazine, USA Today, Entrepreneur Magazine, The Today Show, and many more. Her latest book is called Cues: Master The Secret Language of Charismatic Communication.
    Notes:
    Cues - It’s about warmth and competence. Can I trust you? Can I rely on you? – How are you showing others warmth and competence? Dr. Kofi Essel - His non-verbal protocol for warmth: Fronting - He angles his toes, torso, and head towards the person. Be in alignment with the patient. Non-Verbal bridges - Slowly warm someone up. Lean in. In your 1 on 1 meetings, remove all barriers between you and the person. Show them 100% focus. If you see someone gazing over your head, look where they’re looking. It will help make them aware of what they're doing. Question Inflection - From the Ring founder when he pitched on Shark Tank. This is something that a lot of us mess up. When stating a fact, SAY IT, don’t ask it. The 4 modes of communication: Nonverbal Verbal - Syntax Vocal Imagery Touch – A group of researchers at UC Berkeley watched the first 3 games of the NBA finals in the 2008-2009 season and counted every single time players were seen touching on camera. They found the team that touched the most, won the most games.    Touches = higher trust Speed dating research – Followed 144-speed dates and found that postural expansiveness was the most romantically appealing trait. Participants who took up more space were 76% more likely to be chosen for future dates. Want to show someone they matter? That you’re listening? Turning toward is tuning in. Zoom Calls – How do we best approach them? - Look into the camera so the other person feels you are looking them in the eye. Disney teaches all of their employees (from janitors to princesses) specific nonverbal cues to use with guests. And they all embody the pinnacle of warmth… “Being a highlighter is about constantly searching for the good in people. When you tell people they are good, they become better. When you search for what’s good, you feel great.” “When you try to be the same as everyone else, it’s boring. When you try to fit into a mold, you become forgettable. When you try to be “normal,” you become dull. Just be yourself, because no one is like you. If you’re a little weird, own it. The right people will like you for it.” “Vulnerability is sexy—it shows we are relatable, honest, and real. That is attractive. And the science proves it: “A blunder tends to humanize him and, consequently, increases his attractiveness.” “Humans are purpose-driven creatures. We want to believe there are reasons behind everything we do. Before leaders can inspire action, they have to get emotional buy-in. When we explain the motivations behind a goal, it allows listeners to feel partial ownership of that goal.”

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

GTJAX ,

Every Episode Has Something for Every Leader!

Never been a podcast listener until about 3 weeks ago. I started listening to podcast during my workouts or morning runs. Stumbled across Ryan’s show and have enjoyed every minute of it. He has the great ability to bring out relevant, timeless and crucial information from his guests that will help leaders of all levels. He finds guests that are extremely competent in their callings as well as exceptional at delivering their message. I’ve recommended this show and specific episodes to colleagues, friends and my clients!

Joshill:) ,

The real deal!

Ryan gives great advice and has amazing experts on his show! This is a quality production, keep it up!

@stevebuchanan ,

My most frequent recommendation

I have come to love this podcast. I find the conversational style makes me feel like Ryan and I are sitting together with great mentors. I have recommended this podcast to countless peers, mentees and clients. Ryan, keep up the great work!

Top Podcasts In Business

Ramsey Network
NPR
Ed Mylett
Jocko DEFCOR Network
Guy Raz | Wondery
Andy Frisella #100to0

You Might Also Like

Dave Stachowiak
John Maxwell Company
Essential Communications - Tom Henschel
Mamie Kanfer Stewart
John Maxwell
FranklinCovey