587 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 1.2K Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    587: Daniel Negreanu - Responding To Failure, Risking It All, Getting Rich, Embracing Criticism, Taking Ownership of Your Life, & How To Read People

    587: Daniel Negreanu - Responding To Failure, Risking It All, Getting Rich, Embracing Criticism, Taking Ownership of Your Life, & How To Read People

    Read our new book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/3VlZHCA
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    This episode is supported by Insight Global. Insight Global is a staffing company dedicated to empowering people. Please CLICK HERE for premier staffing and talent.
    Notes: Daniel Negreanu has earned over 52 million dollars at the poker table, which ranks him as the highest-earning player in live tournament poker history. He’s won 6 world series of poker bracelets, two world poker tour titles, and Daniel was inducted into the Poker Hall of Fame in 2014. He’s often referred to as “Kid Poker” and is known for his charismatic personality at the table.
    Commonalities among the greatest poker players in the world: Self-Awareness Humility In order to avoid criticism, “say nothing, do nothing, be nothing.” Daniel is obsessed with the Rocky movies and the lessons learned from each one. Rocky 3 - Don’t get complacent. Rocky 4 - It’s heart versus machine. Rocky Balboa - But it ain't about how hard you hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done! The luck factor... Dealing with things outside of our control. A victim versus an owner mentality. Victims will complain, give up, sulk, be passive-aggressive, or procrastinate. Owners will seek solutions, take action, or ask for help. Victims will focus on things they cannot control, while owners will focus on things they can control. "A big mistake is a beautiful opportunity." It's easier to be a victim and not take responsibility. "Failure builds muscle." "I don't care what others think anymore. I do not have that fear." Rounders (the movie) is the greatest poker movie of all time. Why Daniel is inspired by Sylvester Stallone... He's not complacent In Rocky IV it was heart versus machine. Rocky (Sly) was all heart. Outspoken and direct – “If you have a problem with me, text me. And if you don't have my number then you don't know me well enough to have a problem with me.” – Christian Bale Phil Ivey said about Daniel: “I can't think of too many people who have done more for the game of poker than Daniel.” When was Daniel happiest? “I would say in very high-stress situations. During the World Series of Poker main event [in 2015], when I actually was eliminated in 11th place and felt a gut punch.” Early life – Be Rich – At an early age, Daniel was ambitious: "From the age of four, I thought I'd be rich. I told my mom I'd build a house out of Popsicle sticks and move to California." Sharing both the wins and the losses with his fans: “This is what holding yourself accountable looks like. I could lie, right…or B. I could just not share this with you but then that wouldn’t be authentic and real, right? I’m not just going to share my winning years, I’m going to share my losing years." Daniel is willing to go outside of his comfort zone... Head's up matches with Doug Polk (a head's up specialist): On July 29, 2020, after a years-long feud, Daniel publicly accepted a challenge to a high-stakes grudge match with Doug Polk. They played 25,000 hands of No-Limit Texas Hold'em at $200/$400 stakes. The duel ended on February 4, 2021, with Polk winning approximately $1,200,000 over 25,000 hands. Then in 2023, Daniel got a rematch with Doug and beat him for $200K and a championship belt.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    586: Erika Ayers Badan (Former Barstool Sports CEO) - Deserving Great Mentors, Learning From Failure, Building Your Career, Earning Your Dream Job, & Other Hard Truths About Life As A CEO

    586: Erika Ayers Badan (Former Barstool Sports CEO) - Deserving Great Mentors, Learning From Failure, Building Your Career, Earning Your Dream Job, & Other Hard Truths About Life As A CEO

    Read our book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/3VrogOC
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    This episode is supported by Insight Global. Insight Global is a staffing company dedicated to empowering people. Please CLICK HERE for premier staffing and talent.
    Notes:
    What Erika learned from her dad: “He loved his work and was so full from it. Three weeks before he died he was doing Zoom calls with students from the ER even though it was beyond unnecessary and impractical to do so. If you love what you do it can add so much dimension to your life and the lives of others. He liked people and to learn from them. There’s something to learn from everybody. And the best control was no control - let things happen and learn from them & adapt. Career advice: Know what your company is paying you to do. And the better you make your boss look, the better it will be for you. Find problems and clear the path for your boss. Make their life easier. Make them look good. That’s the role when you have a boss. Must-Haves When she’s making a hiring decision: Be able to share stories of how you’ve gone for something that failed, and learned Be curious, ask thoughtful questions Do research on the company. CARE.  Test the product. Be able to demonstrate that you know what it does. Bring a point of view. Articulate what you could bring to the role and how you could make the company better. Joanne— I wanted to be you until I realized I couldn’t, so I decided to be me. I studied you for twelve years. You are the architect of all my work dreams, and you are the scaffolding I built myself on. You put force into my nature, and for that I am so grateful. Getting the Barstool CEO role: She earned the job over 74 male candidates. “I wanted this job because they were considered too rogue, too untouchable, too badly behaved, too unproven. Dave Portnoy (the founder) was powerful, seemingly unmanageable, and volatile.” In 2012, when Chernin bought a majority stake in Barstool, the company was worth $12 million. You sold it to Penn Entertainment seven years later for $550 million. Make Your Own Luck – When Erika was nearly graduating college, she applied for an internship at Converse no less than 45 times. She never got an interview. Why? “I didn’t do anything unique enough, passionate enough, or memorable enough to deserve a chance at the job.” “It was a heart attack every day for nine years,” Erika said of being Barstool’s CEO. As the first-ever CEO of media magnate Barstool Sports, Ayers Badan led the company through explosive growth (+5000% in revenue and significantly more in audience), expanding the company from a regional blog to a national powerhouse brand and media company. During her 9 years steering the company, Barstool became a top ten podcasting publisher in the US, with the world's #1 sports, hockey, golf, and music podcasts, and a top 6 brand globally on TikTok.

    • 59 min
    585: AJ Jacobs - Creating a Flexible Mind Mind, The Value of Slow-Thinking, Embracing Virtue, Showing Gratitude, and The Year of Living Constitutionally

    585: AJ Jacobs - Creating a Flexible Mind Mind, The Value of Slow-Thinking, Embracing Virtue, Showing Gratitude, and The Year of Living Constitutionally

    Read our USA TODAY Best-Selling Book, The Score That Matters
    https://amzn.to/4bNbVcO
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Notes:
    John Quincy Adams once said, “Gratitude… when it takes possession of the bosom, fills the soul to overflowing and scarce leaves room for any other sentiment or thought.” Ask yourself the question, “What good shall I do today?” When you’re upset that your social media post didn’t get as many likes as you thought it would stop and think, ‘What good shall I do today?” It can reframe how you approach others and be more servant-based (which is a mark of a great leader) The fox mindset versus the hedgehog mindset. A hedgehog has a single lens. It’s more rigid thinking. A fox sees the world through many different lenses. It’s more flexible and adaptive. That is a theme of this conversation. Be open, be less judgemental, and be more curious about the way others view the world. “The older I get, the less certain I get of my opinions.” “It's easier to act your way into a new way of thinking than think your way into a new way of acting.” AJ shared that when he was dedicated to the thank you project even on a bad day when he was focused on saying thank you, his mind eventually caught up to his body. Change Your Mind – the founding fathers did this a lot. Daniel Kahneman said, “No one enjoys being wrong, but I do enjoy having been wrong because it means I am now less wrong than I was before.” Be Humble In Your Opinions – Ben Franklin told a short parable. He said, there was a “French lady, who, in a dispute with her sister said, I don’t know how it happens, sister, but I meet nobody but myself that is always in the right. The point is that we are all that French lady. We all believe we have a monopoly on the truth. (Remind yourself that you’re wrong sometimes) Flexibility of mind: Many of the Founding Fathers were open to the idea that they might be wrong, and more willing to change their minds than leaders are today. At the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin summed up this open-mindedness: “The older I grow the more apt I am to doubt my own judgment.” Think Slow – There are parts of modern life that would benefit from an enforced speed limit. We need fewer hot takes and more cold takes. We need more slow thinking. Writing in depth letters by hand forced ideas to be more nuanced. Thumb-texting acronyms have the opposite effect. Slow down consumption. Forced self to read the news just once a day. The value of slow thinking: For the year, AJ wrote a letter with a quill instead of using social media or texts. It was a revelation. It led to a less impulsive, slower style of thinking – a waiting period for his thoughts. Embrace Virtue – In the founding era, virtue was a cherished ideal (now it’s often used in the phrase virtue signaling which is not a compliment). “A virtuous person puts the interests of others before their one. They focus on those two key words in the Constitution’s Preamble, “General Welfare.” We Control the Sun – The sun carved on the back of George Washington’s wooden chair at the Constitutional Convention. The sun was cut in half by the horizon. Was it rising or setting? At the end of the convention, Ben Franklin said he was convinced it was rising. America had a bright future (the world is built by optimists) Whether the sun sets or rises on democracy, that’s up to us, we the people. In The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Benjamin Franklin tells a story about his father criticizing his writing."About this time I met with an odd volume of the Spectator," Franklin wrote, "I thought the writing excellent, and wished, if possible, to imitate it." AJ’s goal was to try to understand the Constitution by adopting the mindset and lifestyle of the Founders for a full year. He committed to living as the original originalist as a new way of searching for answers to one of the most pressing questions of o

    • 56 min
    584: Craig Robinson - The "Must-Have" Qualities For Coaching Excellence, Becoming a Better Listener, Learning From a Legend, and Thanksgiving Dinner With a Young Barack Obama

    584: Craig Robinson - The "Must-Have" Qualities For Coaching Excellence, Becoming a Better Listener, Learning From a Legend, and Thanksgiving Dinner With a Young Barack Obama

    Our new book, The Score That Matters, is a USA Today Best-Seller!
    Buy it here: https://amzn.to/44HucGf
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Craig Robinson is the host of Ways to Win. He’s the executive director of the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC). From 2017-2020, he served as the VP of Player Development for the New York Knicks. Previously, he was a Division I head men’s basketball coach at Oregon State and Brown. He also is the brother of former First Lady Michelle Obama.
    Notes:
    What Craig learned from Coach Pete Carill about recruiting: There is a sales element to it. And one of the most important skills to develop is to become a great LISTENER. Ask questions, listen, and ask more questions. Curiosity is the ultimate form of respect. Coach Carill won over Craig’s dad because he was curious. That’s a good lesson for all of us. President Obama (Craig's brother-in-law) said Craig’s discipline and diligence enhanced his presidential campaign. “Craig doesn’t profess to know the specifics of politics the way he knows the X’s and O’s of basketball, but I think what he does understand is the need to wake up every morning doing your best and having a positive attitude. And him communicating that to me was always very helpful.” When (future President) Barack Obama was dating Craig's sister (Michelle), he told their family at Thanksgiving dinner that he had aspirations and a plan to be the President of the United States. It seemed crazy at the time, but he made it happen. What are the "must-have" qualities to be a coach on Craig's staff? Connect with people Lifelong learning Curiosity Fill in gaps (be strong where Craig is not) Must be a good listener What Craig looked for in a player when recruiting: Baseline talent (table stakes) 2-3 "bucket-getters" High IQ Flexible After graduating from Princeton, where he played for Pete Carril and was twice named the Ivy League player of the year, Criag wanted to coach. Instead, he went to graduate school and succeeded in the financial world, including spending seven years as a vice president at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter. Then, he pivoted away and took an assistant job on Bill Carmody’s staff at Northwestern. That job eventually led Robinson to Brown, where in two seasons he overhauled the program with his work ethic, tough love, and relentless demands on his players. He put a dictionary in the locker room for players to look up the words he used, a tradition that has continued at Oregon State. What made him not immediately go into coaching? Pete Craill telling him to get a real job. It’s amazing the influence the people we look up to can have on us. Craig's fondest memory? January 20, 2009. He went to President Obama's inauguration in Washington D.C. He then flew to a game on the west coast (as the head coach of Oregon State). And received a standing ovation from the visiting team's crowd as he walked out!

    • 1 hr 5 min
    583: Jason Fried - Growing Without Goals, Earning An Investment From Jeff Bezos, Making Tough Decisions, Keys To A Great Partnership, Hosting Leadership Retreats, and Creating A Writing Practice

    583: Jason Fried - Growing Without Goals, Earning An Investment From Jeff Bezos, Making Tough Decisions, Keys To A Great Partnership, Hosting Leadership Retreats, and Creating A Writing Practice

    Our new book, The Score That Matters, is a USA Today National Best-Seller. Buy it here: https://amzn.to/3Qw9Mu0
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Making decisions – Decisions aren't hard — it's the moments after that are. Whenever I make decisions, I don't think about now, I think about eventually. How will this feel then, maybe a year from now. When it's real, not raw. When the complications around the concern have cleared, and distance has done its job. Goal setting - 37 Signals does not set long-term goals. Jason (as the CEO) helps set the direction and they work in six-week sprints. Think, "What am I optimizing for?" 37 Signals does not have a board of directors or advisors. Is it more helpful to have a chip on your shoulder to prove someone wrong or to be motivated to prove your supporters right? Both can be useful. Keys to a great partnership? Jason works with his co-founder, David Heinemeier Hansson (a previous guest on The Learning Leader Show). Mutual admiration Have complementary skills (Jason is design, DHH is engineering) A company is essentially two things: a group of people and a collection of decisions. How those people make these decisions is the art of running a business. Maxims: Decide what you’re going to do this week, not this year. Whenever you can, swap “Let’s think about it” for “Let’s decide on it.” Momentum fuels motivation. Just ship it. You'll figure out what needs to be fixed as you go. Mark Zuckerberg is coming into his own... There are lots of reasons for it. One of them (maybe)? He's working out, in great shape, fighting MMA style, and surrounding himself around others who are doing the same. All leaders should have a writing practice. Hopefully, you don’t feel the need to send it to a lawyer or a comms team before publishing it or sharing it with the people you’re leading. Write like you talk. Write what’s in your head. Think about what you want to say, and say it. You never know who is watching: Jeff Bezos sat in the front row for one of Jason’s keynotes and was so impressed that he asked to invest in his company. When you have the guts to put your thoughts and beliefs out into the world, it can work as a magnetic effect to attract people to you. It's refreshing to hear Jason talk about one of the core qualities he loves most about Jeff: he is overwhelmingly optimistic. The world is built by optimists. You don’t create culture. It happens. A company's culture is a 50-day moving average. It's what you've been collectively doing as a company over the last 50 days. How do you treat people? Who have you hired (or fired) and why? Company off-site events: They do two per year (one in the United States, and one abroad). Members of Jason's team meticulously design them. One day of business followed by time for the team to hang out, do activities together, eat together, and bond. Does Jason have plans to sell 37 Signals? "No, that would be the demise of the company."

    • 1 hr 12 min
    582: Cal Newport - Obsess Over Quality, Create Time Freedom (like Benjamin Franklin), Limit Daily Goals, Work At a Natural Pace, & How To Be So Good They Can't Ignore You

    582: Cal Newport - Obsess Over Quality, Create Time Freedom (like Benjamin Franklin), Limit Daily Goals, Work At a Natural Pace, & How To Be So Good They Can't Ignore You

    Read our book, The Score That Matters https://amzn.to/44qxsph
    The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Notes on this conversation with Cal Newport
    (Obsess over quality). Jewel obsessed over the quality of her work so much that she turned down a 1m dollar offer (even while living out of her car) because she needed time to make her work excellent. Obsess over the quality of what you produce, even if this means missing opportunities in the short term. Leverage the value of these results to gain more and more freedom in your efforts over the long term. Benjamin Franklin – He hired David Hall to create time freedom. He needed time to think, time to experiment. He gave up money in the short term to gain time freedom to create something for the future. There’s no guarantee that it would pay off, but we all should think about how we can make investments that our future self would thank us for. Have fewer concurrent active projects. Instead of focusing on 10 things, focus on 2 or 3. Make it public. Share with your team. Be known as a leader who focuses on a few important objectives instead of 10 of them.  Match your space to your work – Be in nature, Lin-Manuel Miranda wrote Hamilton in the Morris-Jumel Mansion, the oldest surviving house in Manhattan (served as headquarters for George Washington during the Battle of Harlem Heights, and home of Aaron Burr when he was Vice President), Neil Gaiman built a spartan, 8 sided writing shed that sits on low stilts and offers views on all sides of endless trees. Do Fewer Things: Limit Daily Goals – Cal learned this from his doctoral adviser at MIT. She was incredulous about Cal’s attempts to switch back and forth between multiple academic papers. She preferred to get lost in a single project at a time. Cal was convinced that the slowness of working on just one important thing per day would hold him back. Work at a Natural Pace Don’t rush your most important work. Allow it instead to unfold along a sustainable timeline, with variations in intensity over different timescales, and, when possible, executed in settings conducive to brilliance. Slow productivity emphatically rejects the performative rewards of unwavering urgency. Grand achievement is built on the steady accumulation of modest results over time, and you should give your efforts the breathing room and respect required to make them part of a life well lived, not an obstacle to it. Obsess over Quality By focusing intensely on the small number of activities that matter most to our jobs, you can find both the motivation and justification for slowness. Improve your taste. It’s in the uneasy distance between our taste and our ability that improvement happens – aka in our drive to meet our own high standards. To combat the potential paralysis of perfectionism, think about giving yourself enough time to produce something great, but not unlimited time–focus on creating something good enough to catch the attention of people whose taste you care about but relieve yourself of the need to forge a masterpiece. Gather with people who share similar professional ambitions. When you combine the opinions of multiple practitioners, more possibilities and nuance emerge, and there’s a focusing effect that comes from performing for a crowd. It’s easy to mistake “do fewer things” for “accomplish fewer things” – but this understanding is backward. We work roughly the same number of hours each week regardless of the size of our task lists. Having more commitments simply increases the hours lost to overhead tax – the coordinating activities, such as meetings and email, needed to manage what’s on your plate. The pandemic “zoom apocalypse,” in which many knowledge workers found themselves in Zoom meeting all day long, was caused in part by reaching a state in which overhead tax crowded out almost any time to actually complete tasks. Doing fewer things, in other wo

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

Peachy GA Teach ,

Reigniting My Passion

I am a teacher dedicated to helping my students reach their fullest potential. I recently transitioned to a new school this year, and the change has been challenging in unexpected ways. The competitive spirit and motivation I once thrived on seemed to dissipate in my new environment, as my administration did not actively seek to push us to excel. Consequently, I found myself becoming complacent and less driven. In this period of mediocrity, I also stopped listening to your podcast, which had been a significant source of inspiration and professional growth for me. However, today I woke up feeling tired of settling for less. I decided to listen to episode 581, and it felt like a jolt of energy and motivation. This podcast reignited the fire within me, reminding me of my passion for teaching and the importance of striving for excellence. I am now ready to push myself and my students to the limit, aiming for growth and excellence in all areas. Your podcast has once again become an essential tool in my journey to becoming the best teacher leader I can be. Thank you for your insightful episodes and for helping people from all walks of life rediscover their drive.

jrradd ,

Go-to leadership podcast

This podcast is the best. Always relevant & helpful information extracted. Ryan is an amazing interviewer. Thank you ❤️

Mr Anthony Wesson ,

Excellent Content

I discovered the show while reading Ryan’s book The Pursuit of Excellence. This is the exact type of podcast I enjoy. I push myself to learn everyday and the guests are great and the conversations flow so well. Thank you for your work and dedication to delivering such a well organized podcast.

Top Podcasts In Business

REAL AF with Andy Frisella
Andy Frisella #100to0
The Ramsey Show
Ramsey Network
Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin
Money News Network
Habits and Hustle
Jen Cohen and Habit Nest
NerdWallet's Smart Money Podcast
NerdWallet Personal Finance
The Diary Of A CEO with Steven Bartlett
DOAC

You Might Also Like

Maxwell Leadership Executive Podcast
John Maxwell
Maxwell Leadership Podcast
John Maxwell
At The Table with Patrick Lencioni
Patrick Lencioni
FranklinCovey On Leadership with Scott Miller
FranklinCovey
Coaching for Leaders
Dave Stachowiak
The Working Genius Podcast with Patrick Lencioni
Patrick Lencioni