479 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 1.1K Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    479: David Rubenstein - Interviewing Billionaires, Using Humor To Connect, & The Future Of America

    479: David Rubenstein - Interviewing Billionaires, Using Humor To Connect, & The Future Of America

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with 10's of thousand of other learning leaders, will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week of right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Guest: David M. Rubenstein is Co-Founder and Co-Chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest and most successful private investment firms. Established in 1987, Carlyle now manages $325 billion from 26 offices around the world. David is the host of The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations on Bloomberg TV and PBS and Bloomberg Wealth with David Rubenstein on Bloomberg TV; and the author of The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians, a book published by Simon & Schuster in 2019, How to Lead: Wisdom from the World's Greatest CEOs, Founders, and Game Changers, a book published in 2020, and The American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream, a book published in 2021.
    Notes:
    How David defines success - “Other people tell you that what you’ve done is useful. They admire you. And you help people.” David's goals: Don't do anything to get in public trouble Give away the bulk of his money 4 Key Decisions David made that helped him: Going to law school Working in the Carter White House Starting the Carlyle Group Becoming a philanthropist Why The Carlyle Group? "I fell in love with building something from scratch." "Great ideas don't come from people who are busy." Why does David enjoy interviewing leaders? It gives him an opportunity to follow his intellectual curiosity How does he prepare for his interviews? Reads their books Gets help from a research assistant Digests all the material Writes questions Looks for humor opportunities Humor breaks the tension and produces a common bond "John Kennedy had a great sense of humor." David has lent his home in Nantucket to President Biden. Benjamin Franklin said, "it's a republic if you can keep it." Republics are not easy to keep. David had the opportunity to invest in Facebook when Mark Zuckerberg was in college... But he said no. The keys to the Wright Brother's Success -- Tons of books in their house growing up Their inquisitive nature Their passion to prove a point Commonalities of excellent leaders: Vision Determination - must walk the walk Influence others Communication skill Humility Highly ethical Doesn't need all the credit Higher goals than just money “Persist – don’t take no for an answer. If you’re happy to sit at your desk and not take any risk, you’ll be sitting at your desk for the next 20 years.” "What do most people say on their deathbed? They don't say, 'I wish I'd made more money.' What they say is, 'I wish I'd spent more time with my family and done more for society or my community." "Moneymaking was never anything to me. I was happy never making money; I just was happy doing things I liked. But I fell into the money thing. I now don't feel guilty about it, but I am determined to give away the bulk of it and enjoy doing it." "Anybody who gives away money is mostly looking at things where they think they can make a difference. I'm trying to help people who helped me, educational institutions that helped me with scholarships, or organizations that were very useful to me in growing up." "It's clear to me that when you do private equity well, you're making companies more efficient and helping them grow and become more profitable. That success means our investors - such as public pension funds - benefit, which contributes to the economic wealth of society." "I regard food as fuel. I am not a brunch person." Life and Career advice: Find something you enjoy Experiment Read Keep an open mind

    • 59 min
    478: Susan Cain - Using Pain To Be More Creative, Finding The Right Life Partner, & A New Way To Think About Death

    478: Susan Cain - Using Pain To Be More Creative, Finding The Right Life Partner, & A New Way To Think About Death

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You along with 10's of thousands of other learning leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right!
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Susan Cain is the #1 bestselling author of Bittersweet: How Sorrow and Longing Make Us Whole and Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking, which spent eight years on The New York Times best-seller list, and has been translated into 40 languages. Susan’s TED talks have been viewed over 40 million times. LinkedIn named her the Top 6th Influencer in the World, just behind Richard Branson and Melinda French Gates. Susan partners with Malcolm Gladwell, Adam Grant, and Dan Pink to curate the Next Big Idea Book Club.
    Notes:
    "Compassion means to suffer together." How to use sadness? "Make the pain your creative offering." To suffer with other beings brings people together. When people are grieving the loss of a loved one, they often want to talk about that person. Aristotle wondered why the great poets, philosophers, artists, and politicians often have melancholic personalities… his question was based on the ancient belief that the human body contains 4 humors: each corresponding to a different temperament - melancholic (sad), sanguine (happy), choleric (aggressive), and phlegmatic (calm). Joseph Campbell said, “We should strive to participate joyfully in the sorrows of the world.” Connecting with what matters and taking committed action—moves us from bitter to sweet, from loss to love.” Everyone experiences loss. It is part of the human condition. How have you moved “from bitter to sweet, from loss to love”? Are there coping strategies you recommend? The bittersweet quiz — 1-10. If you scored between 5.8 and 10, you’re a true connoisseur of bittersweetness: the place where light and dark meet. Questions: Do you tear up easily at touching TV commercials? Are you especially moved by old photographs? Do you react intensely to music, art, or nature? Have others described you as an old soul? Do you find comfort or inspiration on a rainy day? Are you moved to goosebumps several times a day? Do you feel elevated by sad music? Do you tend to see the happiness and sadness in things, all at once? Do you seek out beauty in your everyday life?" (I scored a 7.1) “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “The secret to life is to put yourself in the right lighting. For some, it's a Broadway spotlight; for others, a lamplit desk. Use your natural powers -- of persistence, concentration, and insight -- to do work you love and work that matters. Solve problems. make art, think deeply.” “There's zero correlation between being the best talker and having the best ideas.” “If we could honor sadness a little more, maybe we could see it—rather than enforced smiles and righteous outrage—as the bridge we need to connect with each other. We could remember that no matter how distasteful we might find someone’s opinions, no matter how radiant, or fierce, someone may appear, they have suffered, or they will.” “The secret that our poets and philosophers have been trying to tell us for centuries, is that our longing is the great gateway to belonging.” “The tragedy of life is linked inescapably with its splendor; you could tear civilization down and rebuild it from scratch, and the same dualities would rise again. Yet to fully inhabit these dualities—the dark as well as the light—is, paradoxically, the only way to transcend them. And transcending them is the ultimate point. The bittersweet is about the desire for

    • 57 min
    477: Steve Holmes - Finding Your Purpose (Ikigai), Bouncing Back From Failure, & Using Your Working Genius

    477: Steve Holmes - Finding Your Purpose (Ikigai), Bouncing Back From Failure, & Using Your Working Genius

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with tens of thousands of other learning leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me, each Monday morning, to help you start your week off right!
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Steve Holmes founded Springfree Trampoline in 2003 and has overseen its growth to almost 400 employees globally. He is responsible for strategic business development and leads growth initiatives worldwide. Springfree® Trampoline, the World's Safest Trampoline™, was introduced in 2003, and available in Australia in 2004. Dr. Keith Alexander re-designed the trampoline from the ground up to invent Springfree Trampoline, over fifteen years of research and development.
    Notes:
    “I hope that customers describe Springfree as a company which has integrity, honesty, great character, and deals with its customers in a way that values their experience with the brand and the product, and delivers on the promises they make. Living in the tension of competing priorities. This is the job of the leader. It’s happening at all times both at work and at home. We must be aware of and understand how to live in that tension. Your working genius - Jim has learned that his sense of wonder and invention is what brings him the most joy. We have to know what lights us up in order to sustain excellence over time. Responding to losing the Costco account. Steve called the Jim Sinegal and worked out how the relationship would end and then immediately planned for the future to keep his company in business. "The greatest piece of marketing is our customers." How to find your purpose: Ikigai is a Japanese concept that means your 'reason for being. ' 'Iki' in Japanese means 'life,' and 'gai' describes value or worth. Your ikigai is your life purpose or your bliss. It's what brings you joy and inspires you to get out of bed every day. Life is about giving so that others will benefit. The C's of business Clarity Competency Confidence Choice "The pace of change is faster than the pace of learning." Sustained excellence: Humble Hungry Smart As the leader, you must create an environment where people want to learn

    • 58 min
    476: Kat Cole - Pragmatic Optimism, Reflection Questions, Humble Confidence, Building Trust, & The Hot Shot Rule

    476: Kat Cole - Pragmatic Optimism, Reflection Questions, Humble Confidence, Building Trust, & The Hot Shot Rule

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday," and join tens of thousands of Learning Leaders who receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week of right...
    Full show notes at www. LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Kat Cole is the President, COO, and board member at Athletic Greens. She was previously President and COO at Focus Brands, the parent company of Cinnabon, Auntie Anne’s, Moe’s, Schlotzsky’s, McAllister’s, Carvel, Seattle’s Best Coffee International, and Jamba. She oversaw all businesses, their 6,000 operations globally, and the multi-brand licensing and CPG business with 90,000+ points of retail distribution. She has more than 20 years of operational, brand, and executive leadership experience and has an MBA from Georgia State University and an honorary Doctorate from Johnson and Wales University. This episode was recorded at the Insight Global Headquarters in Atlanta, GA as part of the Women's Leadership Council "Raise Your Hand, Raise Your Voice" event. 
    Notes:
    A pragmatic optimist: When Kat was 9 years old, Kat's mom decided to leave her dad. Her dad was an alcoholic. Kat has two younger sisters. Kat was in multiple car accidents with her dad while he was driving drunk. At the age of 9, Kat looked at her mom and said, "What took you so long?" She learned that "the people who are closest to the action know what to do long before the senior leaders do. But they lack the language to articulate the problem and the solution. And they lack the authority to do something about it." "I learned to stay incredibly close to the people who are close to the action from that moment." "With all that he did, my mother never spoke ill of my father. I remember in all of those years, we were super poor. Taking meat scraps from the butcher. I remember one holiday season we were driving around looking at holiday lights. We went through the fancy neighborhoods and she said, 'isn't that beautiful, they must work so hard.' There are these things I absorbed that I started expecting from leaders. I learned to be grounded in the practical (the pragmatic part), but still optimistic because a whole lot is possible with very little, especially if the leader stays close to the action." "I am a learning leader. Learning is my currency." Oh! I get to do something new and I can help people, and I can make money doing it. And money is freedom because it's independence."  "When we left my dad, my mom only had one goal, all she wanted was to raise three independent girls. Our willingness to be independent was her north star." Kat got a job at Hooters and quickly set the record for "close-opens." The shifts where you close the restaurant and open it the next day. She did it 22 straight days. She was then asked to travel to Sydney, Australia and open a new restaurant. She had never left the country and didn't have a passport. She said yes anyway.  She went on to open restaurants on four continents before she was twenty.  How to build trust: It's important to lead through action, not just words. Something as simple as when we get together in person, take time to buy the donuts and coffee or some AG1. Just that effort to find a way to do something that shows you care about their experience. I don't need to say 'I thought of you.' It is obvious." "In my role, my success is your success. Your success comes from me removing friction for you." Vulnerability - Lead with vulnerability first. Share your story.  Holding people accountable - A players do not like seeing B players, C players, people who don't give their best being given equal opportunity. Someone needs to be in control, expectations are communiated and managed, and the leader is keeping us on the tracks. You have to hold people accountable.  Conflict resolution - On Friday night a regular patron would go to Hooters with his friends and order 50 wings... "After fi

    • 1 hr 15 min
    475: Chandler Bolt - The Life Changing Process Of Writing A Book... (How You Can Do It Right Now)

    475: Chandler Bolt - The Life Changing Process Of Writing A Book... (How You Can Do It Right Now)

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You along with 10's of thousands of other Learning Leaders will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Chandler Bolt is an investor, advisor, the CEO of Self-Publishing School & SelfPublishing.com, and the author of 6 bestselling books including his most recent book titled “Published.”. Self Publishing School is an INC 5000 company the last 3 years in a row as one of the 5,000 fastest-growing private companies in the US. He's currently spending his time scaling Self Publishing School, a company he's built from 0 to $20M+ in 5.5 years. 
    Notes:
    Thinking of your topic – What are the broken record conversations you continue to have? What questions do others ask you on a regular basis? The market will help you understand where you add value… Hiring others-- An hour is an hour. A simple metric… Your take-home pay is divided by 2,080. That is your hourly rate. Hire others to do work if it’s cheaper than your hourly rate. This is hard to do but appears to be a wise investment long term The 4 P’s of writing – Person, pain, promise, price. Write to one person… just like you’re responding to an email. "A book is a $15 mentor" Writing process: Mind map Outline Rough draft "People who pay, pay attention." "Go from I want to, to I am doing it." The root word of authority is author Revenue = Vanity Profit = Sanity Cash = King Designing the life you want first... Michael Hyatt has helped him schedule his time off first. “Valuing freedom above all else; entrepreneurs work harder to create future freedom, which directly takes away from their freedom in the present.” “The truth is, you'll never "find the time" to write a book. You have to make it.” “Don’t be the person who misses out on opportunities in life because you take too long to accomplish your work tasks. Be the kind of person other people marvel at. Be the kind of person other people see and say, “I don’t know how they do it.” Be the kind of person who takes action and does so immediately.” Get a free copy of his new book, go to www.PublishedBook.com/Hawk  

    • 1 hr 2 min
    474: Jeffrey Pfeffer - How To Gain Power, Break The Rules, & Advance Your Career

    474: Jeffrey Pfeffer - How To Gain Power, Break The Rules, & Advance Your Career

    Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." Receive a carefully curated email each Monday morning to help you start your week off right...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12    https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12
    Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University where he has taught since 1979. He is the author or co-author of 15 books including Leadership B.S.: Fixing Workplaces and Careers One Truth at a Time; Power: Why Some People Have It—and Others Don’t; The Human Equation: Building Profits by Putting People First; Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management. 
    Notes:
    “The two fundamental dimensions that distinguish people who rise to great heights and accomplish amazing things are will, the drive to take on big challenges, and skill, the capabilities required to turn ambition into accomplishment. The three personal qualities embodied are ambition, energy, and focus. The four skills useful in acquiring power are self-knowledge and a reflective mindset, confidence and the ability to project self-assurance, the ability to read others and empathize with their point of view, and a capacity to tolerate conflict.” “Being memorable equals getting picked.” “Measuring the wrong thing is often worse than measuring nothing because you do get what you measure." “People are seduced by and attracted to narcissists and despots and wind up voting for or working for them, frequently with bad outcomes." Break the rules — in one test, the rule breaker dropped cigarette ashes on the floor and spoke rudely to the waiter. That person was perceived to be 29% more powerful than the person who was more polite. “I completely reject the idea that working adults need to be treated like infants or worse and not told the realities, harsh or not, about the world of work.” Build a powerful brand — in late 2020, Laura Chau was promoted to partner at Canaan Partners, an early-stage venture capital firm. She started a podcast. It gave her the opportunity to ask women who were very senior in their careers to talk for an hour… she expanded her network. Her own status was enhanced through her association with high-status people. Then she started writing and publishing her work. This attracted people to her. A brand needs coherence. Have a narrative and tell it repeatedly. Love: "Kathleen, whom I met at a party in the Green Room of the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco on January 19, 1985, and married on July 23, 1986. As she would say, no algorithm would have matched us." “To the amazing Kathleen, the love of my life, whose death left a hole in my heart and soul.” The 7 rules of Power are:
    1)     Get out of your own way.
    2)     Break the rules.
    3)     Show up in a powerful fashion.
    4)     Create a powerful brand.
    5)     Network relentlessly.
    6)     Use your power.
    7)     Understand that once you have acquired power, what you did to get it will be forgiven, forgotten, or both.

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

RJones9@ ,

Awesome

Ryan Hawk is the best “question asker” out there. Phenomenal at his craft. Incredible preparation for each guest. A tremendous opportunity to learn each and every episode.

GTJAX ,

Every Episode Has Something for Every Leader!

Never been a podcast listener until about 3 weeks ago. I started listening to podcast during my workouts or morning runs. Stumbled across Ryan’s show and have enjoyed every minute of it. He has the great ability to bring out relevant, timeless and crucial information from his guests that will help leaders of all levels. He finds guests that are extremely competent in their callings as well as exceptional at delivering their message. I’ve recommended this show and specific episodes to colleagues, friends and my clients!

Joshill:) ,

The real deal!

Ryan gives great advice and has amazing experts on his show! This is a quality production, keep it up!

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