402 episodes

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk Ryan Hawk

    • Management
    • 4.9 • 930 Ratings

Leaders are learners. The best leaders never stop working to make themselves better. The Learning Leader Show Is series of conversations with the world's most thoughtful leaders. Entrepreneurs, CEO's, World-Class Athletes, Coaches, Best-Selling Authors, and much more.

    402: Donald Miller - How To Tell Your Story, Take Action, & Transform Your Life

    402: Donald Miller - How To Tell Your Story, Take Action, & Transform Your Life

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 to join thousands of leaders of leaders from all over the world and read "Mindful Monday." A carefully curated email of the most useful leadership articles/books/video.
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12
    #402: Donald Miller - CEO of Business Made Simple
    Notes:
    The Characteristics of a Value Driven Professional: “Value driven successful people see themselves as an economic product on the open market. They are obsessed with getting people a strong return on the investment made in them. People who are obsessed with being a good investment attract further investment and get to enjoy more personal economic value. When you offer greater economic value within the economic ecosystem, you are paid more, given more responsibility and promotions, and are sought after by customers looking for value. In business, your boss may really like you, but in large part, they see you as an economic investment. There is nothing wrong with that. So how do we become ridiculously successful? By making other people absurdly successful.” "If you know how to make people money, you will make a lot of money." They have a bias towards action - “There is one thing every successful person has in common: They have a bias towards action.” They don’t let ideas die on the vine. They take action to make those ideas happen. While others may have terrific ideas or be able to see an important issue from many angles, action-oriented people are good at getting things done.” They see themselves as a hero, not a victim. Ask, “How often do you position yourself as a victim?” How often do you talk about yourself as though you are not in control of your life? Do you believe other people are responsible for your failures? Don was born in Texas and grew up poor. His dad left and never came back. His mom had to work long hours just to keep him and his sister alive. He told me, “The biggest transformation in my life happened when I stopped thinking of myself as a victim and started thinking of myself as the hero. I lost 150 pounds and became more in control of my life. If you’re always the victim, you’ll find that people get tired of carrying your load.” They know feedback is a gift. They create an established routine in which they get feedback from their peers. They are relentlessly optimistic - Staying optimistic, you dramatically increase the chances that at some point you will succeed. The more optimistic you are, the more willing you will be willing to try. Successful people fail all the time. The difference is their willingness to keep trying. A story has four characters: Victim - The victim is rescued by the hero. The victim makes the hero look good. It's a bit part. Villian - A backstory of pain. The villian seeks vengeance. Hero - Faces challenges, is focused, overcomes obstacles. Guide - Older, sage, wise. Helps others win "I remember when my biggest transformation happened. I realized that girls wanted to be with the hero, not the victim. I lost 150 pounds." Taking action: "The magic is not in the thinking, it's in the doing." Be a "delusional optimist." It's scientifically proven that people who believe they can do something accomplish more than those who don't. What is a story? "A character that overcomes conflict to try to accomplish something." "Invite people to overcome an obstacle and solve a problem." One piece of advice: "Be known for solving a problem." One problem. We are all in sales. What is sales? "Clear articulation of how you can solve someone's problem." How To Create a Mission Statement and Guiding Principles: “The #1 job of a leader is to wake up every morning, point to the horizon, and let everybody on the team know where the organization is going.” “The #2 job of a leader is to explain, in clear and simple terms, why the story of going to and arr

    • 1 hr 1 min
    401: David Rubenstein - Launching a Business, Living With Purpose, & Loving Your Life

    401: David Rubenstein - Launching a Business, Living With Purpose, & Loving Your Life

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    For full show notes go to www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12
    David M. Rubenstein is a Co-Founder and Co-Executive Chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world’s largest and most successful private investment firms. Mr. Rubenstein co-founded the firm in 1987. Since then, Carlyle has grown into a firm managing $217 billion from 32 offices around the world.
    Notes:
    David is most interested in continuing to learn... He reads six newspapers per day and 100 books per year. Your commencement is the beginning, not the end. "Keep your brain active, it's a muscle. It will atrophy without use." David would give all of his money away to be one year younger... Keys to happiness: Thomas Jefferson said we all have the right to be in pursuit of happiness "It's the most elusive thing in life." Happiness is all about building meaningful relationships The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis -- "JFK showed tremendous leadership to avert disaster. He strategically ignored Khrushchev's second letter and responded to the first one when making a deal to avoid nuclear war. David was in 9th grade at the time and that moment of leadership impacted him in a big way. He worked in the White House for Jimmy Carter. "When I worked in the White House, everyone thought I was the smartest person in the world. When we lost and I didn't have a job anymore, nobody called, and nobody offered me a job." Why leave his job as part of a big law firm? "If you don't love what you do you can't be great at it." Launching The Carlyle Group: Raised $5m Hired incredibly competent people New idea: "I wanted to create a private equity one stop shop." How did he hire well? "I went after the best people I knew and sold them on why they should join me." What was said? Convince them they will have responsibility They will learn a lot They will make more money It will be enjoyable What does David ask in interviews with candidates to hire? "I want to learn mostly about what motivates them." Must have qualities to work at The Carlyle Group: Intelligent Hard working Get along well with others Share credit Effective communicator (both written and the spoken word) Help others Honest/High Integrity Why start The Carlyle Group? "I wanted to prove that my idea could work." What created the success of the company? "It was the luck of meeting great people... Like Bill Conway." "Prior preparation prevents poor performance." What are the keys to being a great interviewer? Good listener Enjoy it Sublimate your ego - It's about the guest, not the interviewer proving how smart they are Why does David like to interview so many people? "My mother said it's because I'm a 'yenta.' I want to know everything." Why own so many of our countries historical documents? (Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence) "I want to remind people of our history." He's one of the first 40 members of the giving pledge and plans to give ALL of his money away to charity. Advice to a young college graduate: Experiment, find things you enjoy Share credit Read a lot... Learn to speak in public Become a skilled writer Retain humility What do most people say on their deathbed? They don't say, 'I wish I'd made more money.' What they say is, 'I wish I'd spent more time with my family and done more for society or my community.' "Anybody who gives away money is mostly looking at things where they think they can make a difference. I'm trying to help people who helped me, educational institutions that helped me with scholarships, or organizations that were very useful to me in growing up."

    • 53 min
    400: Keith Hawk & AJ Hawk - The Life Experiences That Shape Our Character

    400: Keith Hawk & AJ Hawk - The Life Experiences That Shape Our Character

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12
    The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
    Episode #400 with Keith Hawk & AJ Hawk
    Notes:
    I sourced questions from members of my Leadership Circle, friends, listeners, and colleagues for this episode... How does Keith continue to feel impactful after retirement? KH: "It's like I have a paper route. I work a little bit in the mornings, get my work done, and then I can go have fun with my friends. I work on a few boards, do voice over work, and know how to hit the post." What has AJ learned from working with Pat McAfee? "I learned to trust my instincts and not try to be somebody I'm not." What's the best way to make introductions? AJ: "Text (message) intros are so much better. They are more personal." From Leadership Circle member, Amanda Wilson: "What habit do you admire the most in each other/best attribute?" Pistol about AJ: "He's an unbelievable teammate. He has earned the respect of all his peers. I respect his intensity to prepare." Pistol about Ryan: "A huge preparation guy. His focus on other people. He has more of an outer focus now. And a huge intensity around growth." "Gotta change, Gotta grow." AJ about Pistol: Consistency. He wakes up early. I never saw him asleep. He never made us do anything. I want to live up to that standard. I don't want my kids to see me asleep. And universally, everyone loves him." AJ about Ryan: "You're a mini-version of Pistol with your consistency. So detail oriented. Such a leader and not afraid to hold people accountable. People have confidence that you'll take them where they want to go." Ryan about Pistol: Absolute selflessness. Reminds me of my wife, Miranda. A willingness to always help others succeed and will do anything for them. Ryan about AJ: A relentless work ethic. A drive to be there for the people who depend on him. Whenever I talk with teammates of AJ, they all say the same thing, "That's my guy. I know he'll be where he's supposed to be when he's supposed to be there. I can depend on him." He shows up to work everyday and gets it done. Being selfless: Pistol - "My success is better and richer if it follows other people's success." From Jeff Leung (Sr. Engineer at Facebook): "As the father of two young boys, I would love to hear how you and your brother AJ grew up in a way that you cheer for each other more than compete?" A mutual love and respect for each others work. An appreciation for what the other does. From Doug Meyer, Co-Founder/CEO of Brixey & Meyer: "What was your reaction when you heard Ryan was  leaving a high paying job at a large company to take a substantial pay cut to start a Leadership Advisory practice at Brixey & Meyer?" Pistol: "Joy, fun, fulfillment. I was so excited for him." AJ: "Of course. He's gonna kill it." Give an example how you handled when one of your kids wanted to do something but you thought it was a mistake? "When Ryan was at Miami, I probably pushed him too hard to transfer so that he would get another shot to be a starting QB after losing the job to Ben Roethlisberger. I sometimes have thoughts that he could have moved positions and become Julian Edelman." From Nate DeMars (Founder/Owner of Pursuit) - "You guys have all moved onto what I guess you could consider second careers recently… How do you approach starting over as a novice in a new field?" "There is no excuse to not learn everything about what you want to do. There is so much out there to read and watch and people to talk to. If you don't learn it, it's your fault." Find something you care about, that you're passionate about, and pursue that. "Deal with imposter syndrome when you're new. There's never been a better time to learn something new." Life experiences that have shaped you. Pistol, what experiences shaped AJ/Ryan? Playing for the legendary Bob

    • 1 hr 37 min
    399: Josh Kaufman - How To Master The Art Of Business

    399: Josh Kaufman - How To Master The Art Of Business

    Text LEARNERS to 44222
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    IG/Twitter: @RyanHawk12
    Notes:
    Sustaining Excellence = Learn constantly Experiment constantly Obsessive about learning the details, not a cookie cutter approach Rapid Skill Acquisition: Must be specific Break it down: don't try to do it all at once Do research Practice Deconstruct the skill to its smallest parts Make a pre-commitment - "I'm going to practice this skill for 20 hours no matter what." Create fast feedback loops for yourself: Keep a daily log of what you do... Meetings, interactions, what was discussed, how you feel, etc. This helps reinforce the importance of paying attention to the small details of what you're trying to learn If something happens, you can review your notes later Josh has always had "a desire to understand the world around me" Teaching is one of the greatest tools in the world for learning "Management is the act of coordinating a group of people to achieve a goal. Management is not business. Management is not leadership. Management is a supporting function, not a decision making function." "Leadership = define the goal, account for change." "Good management = Recruiting - must get good people Communicating well between teams and decision making parts of the business Must create environment of psychological safety Create a productive working environment Planning - Estimating time lines and schedules Measurement Commander's Intent - "When you are a leader, decision making authority, the least effective thing is for you to make all the ground level decisions." Push decision making power to the people closest to the action. More quotes from Josh's work: “You can't make positive discoveries that make your life better if you never try anything new.” “Every successful business (1) creates or provides something of value that (2) other people want or need (3) at a price they're willing to pay, in a way that (4) satisfies the purchaser's needs and expectations and (5) provides the business sufficient revenue to make it worthwhile for the owners to continue operation. “If you rely on finding time to do something, it will never be done. If you want to find time, you must make time.” “The best thing that can happen to a human being is to find a problem, to fall in love with that problem, and to live trying to solve that problem, unless another problem even more lovable appears.” “Every time your customers purchase from you, they’re deciding that they value what you have to offer more than they value anything else their money could buy at that moment.” “The trouble comes when we confuse learning with skill acquisition. If you want to acquire a new skill, you must practice it in context. Learning enhances practice, but it doesn’t replace it. If performance matters, learning alone is never enough.” "Be positive, force yourself to smile." “Improve by 1% a day, and in just 70 days, you’re twice as good.” “Ideas are cheap—what counts is the ability to translate an idea into reality, which is much more difficult than recognizing a good idea.” “Fear of the unknown will always be with you, no matter what you do. That’s comforting in a way: if there’s nothing you can do to change it, there’s no reason to let it stop you.”

    • 1 hr 2 min
    398: Jim Collins - The Art Of Getting People To Want To Do What Must Be Done (Part 2)

    398: Jim Collins - The Art Of Getting People To Want To Do What Must Be Done (Part 2)

    Text LEARNERS to 44222 for more details...
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Jim Collins books include Good to Great, the #1 bestseller, which examines why some companies make the leap and others don’t; the enduring classic Built to Last, which discovers why some companies remain visionary for generations; How the Mighty Fall, which delves into how once-great companies can self-destruct; and Great by Choice, which uncovers the leadership behaviors for thriving in chaos and uncertainty. Jim has also published two monographs that extend the ideas in his primary books: Good to Great and the Social Sectors and Turning the Flywheel. His most recent publication is BE 2.0 (Beyond Entrepreneurship 2.0), an ambitious upgrade of his very first book; it returns Jim to his original focus on small, entrepreneurial companies and honors his coauthor and mentor Bill Lazier.
    Notes:
    What Exactly is Leadership?” “True leadership only exists if people follow when they would otherwise have the freedom to not follow.” Many business leaders think they are leading when in fact they’re simply exercising power, and they might discover to their horror that no one would follow them if they had no power. General Colin Powell said, “In my 35 years of service, I don’t ever recall telling anyone, ‘That’s an order.” “Leadership is the art of getting people to want to do what must be done.” When Steve Jobs returned to Apple, one of the first people he called was Jim Collins. Jim asked Steve,“what did you first build upon to emerge from the darkness? What gave you hope?” Steve was talking with perhaps the greatest product visionary of our time.. so he expected him to talk about operating systems or the Macintosh computer or other product ideas.  But he didn’t. What did he talk about? People. "It was all about the WHO." History is the “study of surprises.” There will be no “new normal,” there will only be a continuous series of “not normal” episodes, defying predictions and unforeseen by most of us until they happen. This is why we double down on the “first who” principle. Track the number 1 metric: some say sales or profitability or cash flow or something about products. But there’s one metric that towers above them all that’s rarely spoken about in meetings. And that is: The percentage of key seats on the bus filled with the right people  for those seats. How to know when to shift from “develop” to “replace?” Jim has distilled years of reflection down to 7 questions that he offers to stimulate your thinking when you face the “develop or replace” conundrum.  Are you beginning to lose other people by keeping this person in the seat? Do you have a values problem, a will problem, or a skills problem? What’s the person's relationship to the window and the mirror? Does the person see the work as a job or a responsibility? Has your confidence in the person gone up or down in the last year? Do you have a bus problem or a seat problem? How would you feel if the person quit? Jim spent time at West Point as the Chair for the Study of Leadership… One of they key things he learned from that time was the importance of focusing on your unit and taking care of your people, not your career… “The key to a leader’s impact is sincerity. Before he can inspire with emotion he must be swayed by it himself. Before he can move their tears his own must flow. To convince them he must himself believe.” - Winston Churchill Kroger made the leap because they became fanatical about getting the right people in the right seats A key position at your company does the following: Has hiring responsibility A failure by them could expose the company to disaster Their performance has an outsized impact on the business as a whole The Personal Hedgehog Concept You love to do the work You're doing

    • 53 min
    397: Jim Collins - How To Create A Generosity Flywheel, Make The Trust Wager, & Earn WHO Luck (Part 1)

    397: Jim Collins - How To Create A Generosity Flywheel, Make The Trust Wager, & Earn WHO Luck (Part 1)

    Text LEARNERS to 44222
    Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com
    Jim Collins is a student and teacher of what makes great companies tick, and a Socratic advisor to leaders in the business and social sectors. He has written a series of books that have sold more than 10 million copies worldwide. They include Good to Great, the #1 bestseller, which examines why some companies make the leap and others don’t; the enduring classic Built to Last, which discovers why some companies remain visionary for generations; How the Mighty Fall, which delves into how once-great companies can self-destruct; and Great by Choice, which uncovers the leadership behaviors for thriving in chaos and uncertainty. 
    Notes:
    Shortly before Jim's 25th birthday, during his second year at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, he got hit with a lightning bolt of WHO luck. The type of luck that comes as a chance meeting with a person who changes your life. That person was Bill Lazier... Bill Lazier was the closest thing to a father Jim ever had. Jim's dad died when he was 23. Creating a Generosity Flywheel -- “One day, two large wooden crates appeared on your front porch, the address labels indicating they’d be shipped by Bill. He sent you a few dozen bottles of spectacularly good wine. You called and asked him what prompted him to send to you and he said, “Dorothy and I had an inventory problem in our wine cellar, and we needed to make room for some new bottles. We thought you could help us out by taking some of it off our hands.” Bill mastered the art of getting people to accept his generosity, somehow framing it as if you were doing him a favor. Jim's question to me: How is quarterbacking a football team similar to quarterbacking a conversation for a podcast? Make the Trust Wager - “I choose to assume the best in people and accept that they sometimes disappoint.” (Lead With Trust) Build a Meaningful Life by Building Relationships — Life can be a series of transactions or you can build relationships. Transactions can give you success, but inky relationships make for a great life.” —- How do you know if you have a great relationship? “If you were to ask each person in the relationship who benefits more from it, both would answer “I do.” Both feel like they’re getting the better end of the deal. Start with Values, Always Values — values aren’t the “soft stuff.” Living to core values is the hard stuff. "Prep prep prep so that you don't have to be rote." -- "For me the opening plays are questions. And I know the opening two or three questions to get the session started." "Then the game starts. I have this set up things, but then something really surprising happens. What I found interesting about it, is that you'd think high levels of prep, it's actually being so well prepared that you can adapt. That's the critical thing. It's only because you're super prepared that you can do something surprising." The opening question to a company he works with is always the same: "It starts at exactly 8:00am. I have an atomic clock and it's set to the exact atomic time. At 8:00, I open the doors. I walk in and say, "Good morning, I feel a tremendous responsibility to make the most of our time. Everybody take out a blank sheet of paper. I want you to write down the top 5 most brutal facts that face the company today. Go!" -- "We're 12 seconds into the meeting. There are no pleasantries, they're not going to talk about how the flight was, or dinner last night. We are here to make the most of our time. I'm trying to set the tone that we don't have time to waste. I can't waste your time. You're here to have your brain challenged." And then Jim has them allocate 100 points for the 5 most brutal facts. You need to start with an honest account of the brutal facts. This gets the group talking immediately. "The entire thing opens

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
930 Ratings

930 Ratings

Chase Abbott ,

Best content

I’ve been listening since late 2018, it fast became one of my favorite podcasts. There isn’t a Monday that doesn’t go by that I won’t listen to the latest episode. The content that Ryan is putting out is amazing and my personal library is growing fast because of his hard work and connecting me with leaders whom I want to further learn from. Great work, Ryan, and thank you!

Aaron Arntson ,

Great Body of Work

Ryan Hawk consistently puts out some of the most applicable and practical information for leaders of all ages. His material and guests have shown me he is always on the cutting edge of leadership. His tactical applications are timeless applications for leaders at all levels.

Bruce WJr ,

Great Guests

I have listened to a handful of these podcasts. Ryan seems to be a great interviewer with a mixture of preparation and questions and just letting go and allowing the interview go where it will. Awesome guests!

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