99 episodes

Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition.

Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following. The show is made possible by RTI International.

Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.

The Measure of Everyday Life WNCU public radio

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 23 Ratings

Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition.

Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podcast of each show is available online the Wednesday following. The show is made possible by RTI International.

Have thoughts on the show? Let your voice be heard by rating us. You can also join the conversation on Twitter by following @MeasureRadio.

    Special Celebration Episode

    Special Celebration Episode

    We take a break from our usual interviews on this episode to share speeches from a celebration of The Measure of Everyday Life and a new book based on the show, Measuring Everyday Life, held at North Carolina Central University in September 2022.  

    • 30 min
    Engaging People with Science

    Engaging People with Science

    More than ever, we need to connect scientists and various audiences to promote understanding of science and to get input from people about what science should be done. On this episode, we talk with John Besley of Michigan State University and Anthony Dudo of the University of Texas at Austin, authors of a book called Strategic Science Communication: A Guide to Setting the Right Objectives for More Effective Public Engagement.

    • 29 min
    The Arts and Our Brains

    The Arts and Our Brains

    We sometimes look to the arts as an outlet for enjoyment but the arts also can affect our social interactions, our future imagination, and perhaps even how we learn. On this episode, we talk with Susan Magsamen, Executive Director of the International Arts + Minds Lab at Johns Hopkins University.

    • 29 min
    A History of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    A History of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    In 1965, the United States Congress officially recognized Historically Black Colleges or Universities as schools of higher learning, but the history of HBCUs extends all the way back to the 1830s. On this episode, we talk with Dr. Jelani Favors of North Carolina A&T State University, author of the award-winning Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism.

    • 29 min
    Food Insecurity on College Campuses

    Food Insecurity on College Campuses

    Every fall in the U.S., students across the country head off to college. What you might not know is that some of them aren’t sure if they are going to have enough to eat when they are there. On this episode, we talk with two people trying to address that: Katharine Broton of the University of Iowa and Kathleen O’Neill of Bunker Hill Community College in Boston.

    • 29 min
    The Long-Terms Effects of Good Teaching

    The Long-Terms Effects of Good Teaching

    Can you remember a teacher who affected your life? As many students return to school in the U.S., we know teachers can have important effects. How exactly does good teaching make a difference? On this episode, we talk with Julie Schmidt Hasson of Appalachian State University, author of Safe, Seen, and Stretched in the Classroom: The Remarkable Ways Teachers Shape Students’ Lives.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Katie Joy B. ,

Sociology Supreme

Brian and his highly knowledgeable guests are making sociology fun again! The wide variety of topics they cover and the engaging way in which they deliver them had me hooked from my very first listen. They’re also personable and funny, which let’s be honest; isn’t always the easiest to find in the Sociology world. Thanks for putting out such a great show Brian - keep up the great work!

WuKAZUKI ,

Hurray for Social Science Podcasts!

The Measure is the best interview podcast for social science topics. I’ll let that previous sentence sink in for a moment to appreciate where we are as a civilization technologically-speaking.

Dr. Brian Southwell speaks with researchers and the resulting interviews are informative, insightful, and exceptionally interesting. My brain feels like it’s exercising (in the best way possible) when I listen.

Oh, and because I know it matters to me... don’t worry, the sound quality is beautiful.

ChristiePS ,

Straightforward, diverse topics, great interviews

Brian Southwell is an excellent interviewer, and his guests are not only expert but great storytellers. These episodes are short on time and long on information that is interesting to both those knowledgeable about the social sciences and those unfamiliar. In particular, the topics are usually those relegated to the halls of academia, but Brian and his guests make them interesting and accessible to the broader public. If there is any issue you think you'd like to know more about, I recommend finding it in the back catalogue and giving a listen. You're sure to find it, and sure to enjoy.

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