194 episodes

Each episode will go deep on a big story you’ll definitely want to hear more about. We’ll share with you our best investigations (think private prisons, electoral skullduggery, Dark Money, and Trump's Russia connections), and informative interviews with our reporters and newsmakers. We're hoping to make your week more informed with the stories that really matter, told by us, the folks you trust for smart, fearless reporting.

The Mother Jones Podcast Mother Jones

    • News
    • 4.5 • 1K Ratings

Each episode will go deep on a big story you’ll definitely want to hear more about. We’ll share with you our best investigations (think private prisons, electoral skullduggery, Dark Money, and Trump's Russia connections), and informative interviews with our reporters and newsmakers. We're hoping to make your week more informed with the stories that really matter, told by us, the folks you trust for smart, fearless reporting.

    A Special Announcement

    A Special Announcement

    Things have been a bit quiet around these parts lately, huh? After a few months bringing you some of our best feature investigations read aloud, in partnership with Audm, we’re going through some behind-the-scenes newsroom changes that will impact how we best serve you, our listener. We’re going to be taking some more time, off-air, to re-tool and recalibrate. Goodbyes are hard! But it’s not really a goodbye. It a “goodbye for now”. And Mother Jones journalism isn’t going anywhere. You can continue to listen to our incisive stories on Audm through their app and on our website. And, of course, there is a ton of beautiful multimedia journalism from our newsroom on Instagram, YouTube, and even on our new TikTok profile. We’ll pop up again here in the future, no doubt, but for now, from everyone on the team with love and appreciation: See ya, and thanks.

    —James West, Mother Jones Deputy Editor

    • 2 min
    Today It’s Critical Race Theory. 200 Years Ago It Was Abolitionist Literature.

    Today It’s Critical Race Theory. 200 Years Ago It Was Abolitionist Literature.

    We bet you’ve heard one phrase more and more this year than ever before: Critical Race Theory. It’s an obsession on Fox News, and it’s the topic, along with anti-mask protests, raging at school board hearings across the country—a new frontier in a roiling culture war. But what is Critical Race Theory? And how did it come to be used to whip up a new hysteria on the right? States are now racing to ban the teaching of CRT, many successfully, even while many of its fiercest critics can barely explain what it is.

    For this week’s episode of the Mother Jones Podcast, some much-needed history. Journalist Anthony Conwright argues that this current anti-CRT movement is part of a long standing war in America against Black liberation dating back hundreds of years. This compelling essay originally appeared in the September/October edition of Mother Jones Magazine. It is read aloud here by our partners at Audm.

    • 14 min
    Are These Black Leaders on the Cusp of a New National Movement?

    Are These Black Leaders on the Cusp of a New National Movement?

    With everything going on these days—we’ll spare you the list of existential crises we’re currently living through—now seems like the perfect time to hear from two leaders who have a revolutionary vision of what this country could be.

    Last week, in a special livestream event, Mother Jones reporter and columnist Nathalie Baptiste spoke to two fascinating politicians that may be on the cusp of a national movement. Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba is the youngest-ever mayor of Jackson, Mississippi. India Walton won a historic upset primary against a four-term incumbent and is the Democratic nominee for the mayor of Buffalo, New York.

    They are from two different cities—over 1,000 miles apart—but both of these young Black leaders have put forward progressive agendas that have been called “radical.”

    And right now, words like “radical” or “socialist” or “progessive” seem to have shifting definitions. For some, those words are interchangeable. So we hear from Mayor Lumumba and Walton directly: how do they define themselves? What do they consider the biggest obstacle to a robust socialist party in the United States? And this wouldn’t be a conversation during the years of the pandemic without finding out what, if any, guilty-pleasure TV shows are on their watch list. (Any Madam Secretary fans in the house?)

    • 55 min
    The Nightmare of Getting an Abortion in the South

    The Nightmare of Getting an Abortion in the South

    A week ago, thousands of people turned out for Women's March rallies across the country, galvanized by Texas' recent six-week abortion ban and the very real fear that Roe v. Wade could soon be overturned, as challenges to the Texas law and another law in Mississippi wend their way to the Supreme Court and its 6-3 conservative majority. 

    But while the battle over the Texas law rages, and people rightfully worry about a world in which abortion access is no longer protected, women in Mississippi are already living it.

    In 2019, reporter Becca Andrews went to Mississippi to explore where Roe doesn't reach, meeting a young woman on a 221-mile journey to get an abortion beyond state lines. The Mother Jones Podcast team thought revisiting Becca’s piece provided compelling context for just how high the stakes are for people needing abortions in Texas right now, and more broadly, for the consequential decision in the hands of the Supreme Court.

    Listen to Becca's 2019 story, currently being expanded into a book, on this week's episode of the Mother Jones Podcast, produced in partnership with Audm. Note: Some facts on the ground have evolved since this story was first published in 2019.

    • 23 min
    Ammon Bundy Is Running to Be Idaho’s Next Governor

    Ammon Bundy Is Running to Be Idaho’s Next Governor

    Mother Jones reporter Stephanie Mencimer has been following Ammon Bundy for years. He's the guy you'll remember who became a kind of folk hero on the far-right after he joined his father, rancher Cliven Bundy, in leading an armed standoff against the Bureau of Land Management in Nevada in 2014. Two years later, Ammon led the armed takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, which left one occupier dead. Bundy went to trial twice on criminal charges related to the standoffs but federal prosecutors failed to win a conviction.

    Now he’s a big-time celebrity activist and running for governor of Idaho. Shortly before the pandemic started, he created what has been dubbed “Uber for militias”—a kind of network that can summon armed protesters for all sorts of far-right gatherings, including anti-mask and anti-vaccine protests during the pandemic.

    He’s a messianic figure, and Mencimer wanted to understand what the appeal was. She found a complicated and very-American story about violence, religion, and public lands battles in the West. This in-depth profile was published in Mother Jones earlier this year, and reproduced in read-aloud form here by our partners at Audm.

    • 1 hr
    How Flint Closed the Gap Between Black and White Suffering Under COVID

    How Flint Closed the Gap Between Black and White Suffering Under COVID

    As the Delta variant upended hope of returning to normal this summer, Mother Jones reporter Edwin Rios published a deeply reported story on Flint, Michigan, recounting how residents of this predominantly Black city have battled COVID-19 in spite of government distrust, neglect, and environmental catastrophe.

    But the pandemic isn’t Flint’s first crisis: In 2014, public officials implemented cost-cutting measures that led to dangerous concentrations of lead in the city’s water supply. Up to 12,000 children were exposed to contaminated water. Then-President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency. And in 2021, nine people—including ex-Gov. Rick Snyder—were indicted on criminal charges in the matter.

    A few years later, when COVID-19 barreled across the globe and vaccinations became a political flashpoint, Flint already had an infrastructure of outreach and support in place. Their water crisis wound up being a crash course in how residents learned to band together in a catastrophe—and shows how one community used a dose of social medicine to close the gap between Black and white suffering during a pandemic.

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
1K Ratings

1K Ratings

TMSD72 ,

Oh no what a loss

Sorry to hear that this is ending (for now) I really enjoyed your podcast. I will miss the hard hitting honest stories, and the willingness to speak truth to power. Thanks for the journey and I will keep an eye out for your return.

PhelineCat ,

Becoming Costly

Mother Jones has hopped on to the, probably not for profit, but who knows? podcasting bandwagon, by going to Audm. Have we been charged for radio? Not in the US. MJ has a magazine that likely generates a fair amount
of ad revenue (not add, folks) and I don't remember if the podcast has sponsors or Patreon because I listen sporadically. Sporadically enough that it's not worth paying a lump sum to download and delete.

All these nickles and dimes, these $5-$10/month charges on podcasts (and apps) that also have advertising content just drives away listeners. Stop thinking of us a potential revenue stream.

midwestBlue ,

9.16 pod

this is the feds fault for being afraid to put that whole bunch of the bundy’s n band of marauders into fed prison. they took over the reserve and held the workers hostage. there should have been no reason not to be able to imprison these militia nuts but the feds by not doing that emboldened these nuts. totally dangerous people. they talk about the land as their land. privilege whites. if anyone gets the land back its not them its the indigenous people who it was stolen from but these militia nuts always think they were the first ones on this land. feds need to stop these dangerous nut jobs.

Top Podcasts In News

The New York Times
NPR
The Daily Wire
Cumulus Podcast Network | Dan Bongino
New York Times Opinion
Serial Productions

You Might Also Like

ASF Productions
Michael Isikoff, Daniel Klaidman, Victoria Bassetti
CAFE
Chris Hayes, MSNBC & NBCNews THINK
The Nation Magazine
Harry Litman

More by Mother Jones