150 episodes

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

The Political Scene | The New Yorker The New Yorker

    • News
    • 4.2 • 2.9K Ratings

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

    From WIRED Politics Lab: How Election Deniers Are Weaponizing Tech To Disrupt November

    From WIRED Politics Lab: How Election Deniers Are Weaponizing Tech To Disrupt November

    Election deniers are mobilizing their supporters and rolling out new tech to disrupt the November election. These groups are already organizing on hyperlocal levels, and learning to monitor polling places, target election officials, and challenge voter rolls. And though their work was once fringe, its become mainstreamed in the Republican Party. Today on WIRED Politics Lab, we focus on what these groups are doing, and what this means for voters and the election workers already facing threats and harassment.Listen to and follow WIRED Politics Lab here.Be sure to subscribe to the WIRED Politics Lab newsletter here.

    • 14 min
    What to Expect from Trump’s First Criminal Trial

    What to Expect from Trump’s First Criminal Trial

    The New Yorker staff writer Eric Lach joins Tyler Foggatt to provide a preview of Donald Trump’s first criminal trial, which begins next week in Manhattan. Trump faces thirty-four felony counts for falsifying business records related to hush-money payments made to the adult-film star Stormy Daniels in 2016. Lach and Foggatt discuss the features of the controversial case and what six straight weeks of court appearances could mean for Trump’s campaign. To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 30 min
    The Attack on Black History in Schools

    The Attack on Black History in Schools

    Across much of the country, Republican officials are reaching into K-12 classrooms and universities alike to exert control over what can be taught. In Florida, Texas, and many other states, laws now restrict teaching historical facts about race and racism. Book challenges and bans are surging. Public universities are seeing political meddling in the tenure process. Advocates of these measures say, in effect, that education must emphasize only the positive aspects of American history. Nikole Hannah-Jones, the New York Times Magazine reporter who developed the 1619 Project, and Jelani Cobb, the dean of the Columbia University School of Journalism, talk with David Remnick about the changing climate for intellectual freedom. “I just think it’s rich,” Hannah-Jones says, “that the people who say they are opposing indoctrination are in fact saying that curricula must be patriotic.” She adds, “You don’t ban books, you don’t ban curriculum, you don’t ban the teaching of ideas, just to do it. You do it to control what we are able to understand and think about and imagine for our society.”

    • 36 min
    After the World Central Kitchen Attack, How Far Will Biden Shift on Israel?

    After the World Central Kitchen Attack, How Far Will Biden Shift on Israel?

    The Washington Roundtable: Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss how the Israeli strike on World Central Kitchen workers in Gaza could factor into a policy shift by the Biden Administration on Israel and the war. President Biden realized that he needed to “catch up to where the country was,” Osnos says. Then the British barrister Philippe Sands, a prominent specialist in international law who represents the state of Palestine in the case against the Israeli occupation before the International Court of Justice, joins the group to discuss whether the laws of war have been violated in this conflict.This week’s reading:
    “Donald Trump’s Amnesia Advantage,” by Susan B. Glasser
    “Biden’s Increasingly Contradictory Israel Policy,” by Isaac Chotiner
    “What It Takes to Give Palestinians a Voice,” by Robin Wright
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send  feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com with “The Political Scene” in the subject line.

    • 36 min
    How Should Reporters Cover Donald Trump?

    How Should Reporters Cover Donald Trump?

    The New Yorker staff writers Jelani Cobb and Steve Coll joined Tyler Foggatt last May to discuss the ways in which Donald Trump maneuvers around facts and controls narratives when confronted by journalists. At last year’s CNN town hall, for example, Trump answered questions in front of a live and sympathetic audience—a setup that played to his strengths as a performer. For Cobb and Coll, who are Columbia Journalism School faculty members, the town hall raised some questions: Where is the line between coverage and promotion? And what is the role of news organizations in the age of political polarization? Cobb and Coll spoke about the dilemmas that journalists face when reporting on the former President and his 2024 campaign, and some potential solutions.This episode originally aired on May 25, 2023. To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 34 min
    Kara Swisher on Tech Billionaires: “I Don’t Think They Like People”

    Kara Swisher on Tech Billionaires: “I Don’t Think They Like People”

    Kara Swisher landed on the tech beat as a young reporter at the Washington Post decades ago. She would stare at the teletype machine at the entrance and wonder why this antique sat there when it could already be supplanted by a computer. She eventually foretold the threat that posed to her own business—print journalism—by the rise of free online media; today, she is still raising alarms about how A.I. companies make use of the entire contents of the Internet. “Pay me for my stuff!” she says. “You can’t walk into my store and take all my Snickers bars and say it’s for fair use.” She is disappointed in government leaders who have failed to regulate businesses and protect users’ privacy. Although she remains awed by the innovation produced by American tech businesses, Swisher is no longer “naïve” about their motives. She also witnessed a generation of innovators grow megalomaniacal. The tech moguls claim they “know better; you’re wrong. You’ve done it wrong. The media’s done it wrong. The government’s done it wrong. . . . When they have lives full of mistakes! They just paper them over.” Once on good terms with Elon Musk, Swisher believes money has been deleterious to his mental health. “I don’t know what happened to him. I’m not his mama, and I’m not a psychiatrist. But I think as he got richer and richer—there are always enablers around people that make them think they hung the moon.”This segment originally aired on March 1, 2024.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

the_ice_within ,

Great content but SG needs to stop interrupting

Everyone has great insight but SG always shuts down or interrupts the other hosts which is rude and not great to listen to

historyty7 ,

You missed something

Your recent discussion of the political change of Democratic Party Senators and Joe Biden toward any d to Israel failed to mention the primary results in Democratic primaries. The uncommitted voters who cast undecided ballots sent a clear message to the campaign that they needed a change in Borden’s approach to Israel. It needs analysis to determine how much this domestic political influence led to Biden changing course.

omelettetron ,

Expected more Jay Caspian Kang

Talked at length about the Tik Tok fiasco without mentioning the fact that American Tech Companies will benefit tremendously by forcing Tik Tok into a corner. They spend millions and millions lobbying our government with anti Tik Tok propaganda. Closed door meetings with our clueless gov reps getting advice from the tech scum of our country (the scum responsible for ruining the internet) is obviously going to influence gov in their favor. To solve the problem, we need internet regulating legislation across all tech companies, but it’s not possible because tech scum are in the pockets of nearly everyone including you and me.

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