22 episodes

On The ReadME Podcast, we take a look behind the scenes of the most impactful open source projects and the developers who make them happen. Our guests are coding in public, working on the periphery of open source, and taking time to consider how we think about technology. In sharing these stories, we hope to provide a spotlight on what you don’t always see in the lines of code, and what it takes to build the technology that inspires us all.

Check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme

The ReadME Podcast GitHub

    • Technology
    • 5.0 • 23 Ratings

On The ReadME Podcast, we take a look behind the scenes of the most impactful open source projects and the developers who make them happen. Our guests are coding in public, working on the periphery of open source, and taking time to consider how we think about technology. In sharing these stories, we hope to provide a spotlight on what you don’t always see in the lines of code, and what it takes to build the technology that inspires us all.

Check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme

    Hosts in the hot seat

    Hosts in the hot seat

    For the final ReadME Podcast episode of Season 2 our hosts Brian and Neha turn the spotlight around and interview each other. The conversation covers everything from Nintendos at Christmas and university computer hand-me-downs to Encarta, Ask Jeeves, and Netscape. They also dive down the rabbit hole of their tech journeys—starting from the beginning. Learn how they got into open source and who gave them the nudges they needed to really find their stride. They also share their approaches to imposter syndrome, what keyboard shortcuts they love, and whether they prefer coffee or tea. There’s a little serendipity, a lot of OSS love, and a few surprises along the way.

    Check out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readmeign-up

    And sign-up for our monthly newsletter: https://github.com/readme/#newsletter

    • 43 min
    FreeCodeCamp: For curious people, by curious people

    FreeCodeCamp: For curious people, by curious people

    As a school director, Quincy dabbled with code to automate some of his colleagues’ more administrative tasks—and it changed everything. Computers tackled the tedious work, and teachers could focus on teaching. This led Quincy to pursue programming more seriously, but his transition to work as a software engineer was a bit rocky. Inspired to find a better way, he merged his love of education with coding to create FreeCodeCamp in 2014. Quincy opens up about his life pre-programming, the lightbulb moment behind FreeCodeCamp, and why it’s important that it stays accessible.



    Quincy on GitHub:   https://github.com/QuincyLarson



    Check out FreeCodeCamp:  https://www.freeCodeCamp.org



    Be sure to check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme and sign-up for our monthly newsletter: https://github.com/readme/#newsletter

    • 33 min
    Keeping creativity alive while managing workloads

    Keeping creativity alive while managing workloads

    Jani Eväkallio discovered programming when he was stuck inside with a broken leg as a teenager. He fell in and out of programming afterwards and took an OSS hiatus at 16. He has since dove back in and maintained countless projects over the years—but quickly recognized his own limitations and didn’t hesitate to hand over the reins to those looking for the responsibility. Jani discusses his relationship with open source, why he turned down millions of dollars for FOAM, and where he’s currently channeling his creativity.  



    Jani on GitHub: https://github.com/jevakallio   



    Jani on the web: https://jevakallio.dev/ 



    Be sure to check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme and sign-up for our monthly newsletter: https://github.com/readme/#newsletter

    • 33 min
    Three careers and motherhood are just the start

    Three careers and motherhood are just the start

    Salma Alam-Naylor, aka White Panther, discovered programming at a young age but focused on music and comedy into her twenties. Though her path to developing wasn’t obvious or linear, she wouldn’t change it for anything. Today, she’s a positive force in open source, making an impact on Twitch, Discord, and via her vocal commitment to accessibility and inclusivity in tech. In our conversation, she shares her journey to open source, where music and code meet, and how becoming a parent changed her perspective on the future of work.



    Salma on GitHub: https://github.com/whitep4nth3r



    Salma on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/whitep4nth3r



    Salma on Discord: https://discord.com/invite/theclaw



    Be sure to check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features https://github.com/readme, and sign-up for our monthly newsletter: https://github.com/readme/#newsletter

    • 53 min
    Where utility meets beauty: Hoppscotch

    Where utility meets beauty: Hoppscotch

    Liyas Thomas is the founder of Hoppscotch, an open source API development ecosystem that’s seen exponential growth. Encouraged by his own mentors, Liyas now maintains Hoppscotch full time. Whether he’s programming or pursuing his passion for art, he always puts beauty at the core of his work. During this conversation, he shares his path to Hoppscotch, the importance of community, and a preview of his newest endeavor: a book.

    Liyas on GitHub: https://github.com/liyasthomas

    Liyas' website: https://liyasthomas.com/

    Be sure to check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme

    • 35 min
    Giving 110% in the right place at the right time

    Giving 110% in the right place at the right time

    Fred Schott’s love for programming started early, and he worked hard during his 20s at companies like Box and Google. As his own side projects experienced open source success, Fred took the plunge in 2021 and started Astro, a JavaScript-based static site builder full time. In this conversation, he speaks about his introduction to open source, his path to Astro, and the role luck plays in success.



    Fred on GitHub: https://github.com/fredkschott



    Astro on the web: https://astro.build/blog/introducing-astro/



    Be sure to check-out The ReadME Project for more episodes, stories and features: https://github.com/readme

    • 48 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

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GitHub, this word is enough

Looking forward to something interesting 😊

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