225 episodes

The Royal Irish Academy/Acadamh Ríoga na hEireann is an all-Ireland, independent, academic body that promotes study and excellence in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. It is the principal learned society in Ireland and has over 420 members who are elected in recognition of their academic achievements.

The Royal Irish Academy, the academy for the sciences and humanities for the whole of Ireland will vigorously promote excellence in scholarship, recognise achievements in learning, direct research programmes and undertake its own research projects, particularly in areas relating to Ireland and its heritage.

The Royal Irish Academy The Royal Irish Academy

    • Education

The Royal Irish Academy/Acadamh Ríoga na hEireann is an all-Ireland, independent, academic body that promotes study and excellence in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. It is the principal learned society in Ireland and has over 420 members who are elected in recognition of their academic achievements.

The Royal Irish Academy, the academy for the sciences and humanities for the whole of Ireland will vigorously promote excellence in scholarship, recognise achievements in learning, direct research programmes and undertake its own research projects, particularly in areas relating to Ireland and its heritage.

    Brendan O'Leary Hon. MRIA in conversation with Ben Lowry, Deputy Editor, News Letter

    Brendan O'Leary Hon. MRIA in conversation with Ben Lowry, Deputy Editor, News Letter

    Brendan O’Leary Hon. MRIA discusses his latest three volume book 'A Treatise on Northern Ireland' with Ben Lowry, Deputy Editor, News Letter .

    Brendan O'Leary is an Irish, European Union, and US citizen, and since 2003 the Lauder Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author, co-author, and co-editor of twenty eight books and collections, and the author or co-author of hundreds of articles or chapters in peer-reviewed journals, university presses, encyclopedia articles, and other forms of publication, including op-eds. His latest production is a three-volume study called A Treatise on Northern Ireland, published by Oxford University Press, which has been positively reviewed in the Dublin Review of Books, the Irish News, and the Irish Times.

    He recently co-authored a research report, Northern Ireland and the UK’s Exit from the EU: What Do People Think? Evidence from Two Investigations: A Survey and a Deliberative Forum (PI: Garry, J., McNicholl, K., O’Leary, B., & Pow, J., Queen’s University Belfast, 2018 sponsored by the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council), and is currently researching the UK's secession from the EU, and possible models of Irish re-unification.

    Ben Lowry is a distinguished journalist and political commentator from Northern Ireland. Inter alia he has articulated the view that Northern Ireland’s establishment was an essential part of the administration of the island of Ireland.

    When: Wednesday, January 8, 2020, 19:30 - 21:00
    Where: Benburb Priory Library and Museum, Main Street, Benburb, Co Tyrone BT 71 7JZ

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Genius Of The East? Moore's Orientalism

    Genius Of The East? Moore's Orientalism

    Dr Daniel Roberts gave the third lecture in The Royal Irish Academy series on 'Discovering Thomas Moore' on Wednesday 6 November 2019 in Academy House.

    This lecture series accompanied our exhibition 'Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe'. Curated by musicologist Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB, the exhibition exposes the breadth of Moore’s research and writing about Ireland and explores Moore’s role as an Irish writer with an international reputation in positioning Ireland within Europe through cultural exchange. It also addresses contemporary European fascination with the orient and Moore’s influential role in depicting eastern culture, particularly via his hugely successful work, Lalla Rookh.
    Speaker:

    Daniel Sanjiv Roberts teaches Eighteenth-Century and Romantic-Period Literature at Queen’s University Belfast. He has edited Thomas De Quincey and Robert Southey and written extensively on Romanticism and the East.
    Other lectures in this series:

    9 October, 2019: ‘Re-imagining Moore’ by Prof. Harry White, MRIA, School of Music, UCD

    30 October, 2019: ‘Thomas Moore in Paris’ by Dr Tríona O'Hanlon, Independent Scholar

    13 November, 2019: ‘Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh’ by Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    20 November, 2019: ‘The politicization of the harp through Moore's Irish melodies’ by Prof. Úna Hunt, Conservatory of Music and Drama, TU Dublin

    • 39 min
    Re-imagining Moore

    Re-imagining Moore

    Professor Harry White, MRIA gave the first lecture in The Royal Irish Academy series on 'Discovering Thomas Moore' on Wednesday 9 October 2019 in Academy House.
    This lecture series accompanied our exhibition 'Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe'. Curated by musicologist Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB, the exhibition exposes the breadth of Moore’s research and writing about Ireland and explores Moore’s role as an Irish writer with an international reputation in positioning Ireland within Europe through cultural exchange. It also addresses contemporary European fascination with the orient and Moore’s influential role in depicting eastern culture, particularly via his hugely successful work, Lalla Rookh.

    This lecture is part of the Dublin Festival of History programme.
    Speaker:

    Harry White is Professor of Music at University College Dublin and a Fellow of the Royal Irish Academy of Music. His publications include The Keeper's Recital (1998), The Progress of Music in Ireland (2005), Music and the Irish Literary Imagination (2008) and (with Barra Boydell) The Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland (2013). He was elected to the Royal Irish Academy in 2006 and to the Academy of Europe in 2015. In 2018, he became the first Irish person to be elected a Corresponding Fellow of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts.
    Other lectures in this series:

    30 October, 2019: ‘Thomas Moore in Paris’ by Dr Tríona O'Hanlon, Independent Scholar

    6 November, 2019: ‘Genius of the East? Moore's Orientalism’ by Dr Daniel Roberts, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    13 November, 2019: ‘Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh’ by Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    20 November, 2019: ‘The politicization of the harp through Moore's Irish melodies’ by Prof. Úna Hunt, Conservatory of Music and Drama, TU Dublin

    • 43 min
    Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh

    Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh

    Dr Sarah McCleave gave the fourth lecture in the Royal Irish Academy series on 'Discovering Thomas Moore' on Wednesday 13 November 2019 in Academy House.

    This lecture series accompanied our exhibition 'Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe'. Curated by musicologist Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB, the exhibition exposes the breadth of Moore’s research and writing about Ireland and explores Moore’s role as an Irish writer with an international reputation in positioning Ireland within Europe through cultural exchange. It also addresses contemporary European fascination with the orient and Moore’s influential role in depicting eastern culture, particularly via his hugely successful work, Lalla Rookh.
    Speaker:

    Sarah McCleave, a musicologist, is a senior lecturer in the School of Arts, English and Languages at Queen’s University Belfast. A founding member of the Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies at Queen’s, her research on the Gibson-Massie Moore collection at Queen’s led to the Horizon 2020-funded project ERIN: Europe’s Reception of the Irish Melodies and National Airs: Thomas Moore in Europe. McCleave is co-editor of two volumes of essays on Thomas Moore (Routledge, 2017 and 2020); she considers Moore’s working methods in her chapter, “The genesis of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies”, for Cheap Print and Popular Song in the Nineteenth Century (Cambridge University Press, 2017). She has also published on Moore and Irish song through the ‘Romantic National Song Network’,

    • 28 min
    Thomas Moore In Paris

    Thomas Moore In Paris

    Dr Tríona O'Hanlon gave the second lecture in the Royal Irish Academy series on 'Discovering Thomas Moore' on Wednesday 30 October 2019 in Academy House.
    This lecture series accompanied our exhibition 'Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe'. Curated by musicologist Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB, the exhibition exposes the breadth of Moore’s research and writing about Ireland and explores Moore’s role as an Irish writer with an international reputation in positioning Ireland within Europe through cultural exchange. It also addresses contemporary European fascination with the orient and Moore’s influential role in depicting eastern culture, particularly via his hugely successful work, Lalla Rookh.
    Speaker:

    Tríona O’Hanlon is a violinist and musicologist. She received her PhD in Musicology in 2012 from the Technological University Dublin. Tríona was a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow in Music at the School of Arts, English and Languages, Queen’s University Belfast for 2015–17 where she worked on the Horizon 2020 funded project ERIN: Europe’s Reception of the Irish Melodies and National Airs; Thomas Moore in Europe. She has held research fellowships at Marsh’s Library, Dublin (2014), The Royal Dublin Society Library and Archives (2015), and she was awarded a Royal Irish Academy Charlemont Grant for 2016. She is the first musicologist ever to receive the Carl H. Pforzheimer, Jr., Research Grant awarded by the Keats-Shelly Association of America (2017). Tríona’s research interests include the historiography of music in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Dublin; song culture and its dissemination; source studies and bibliography.
    Other lectures in this series:

    9 October, 2019: ‘Re-imagining Moore’ by Prof. Harry White, MRIA, School of Music, UCD

    6 November, 2019: ‘Genius of the East? Moore's Orientalism’ by Dr Daniel Roberts, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    13 November, 2019: ‘Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh’ by Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    20 November, 2019: ‘The politicization of the harp through Moore's Irish melodies’ by Prof. Úna Hunt, Conservatory of Music and Drama, TU Dublin

    • 48 min
    The politicization of the harp through Moore's Irish melodies

    The politicization of the harp through Moore's Irish melodies

    Professor Úna Hunt gave the fifth and final lecture in the Royal Irish Academy series on 'Discovering Thomas Moore', on Wednesday 20 November 2019 in Academy House.

    This lecture series accompanied our current exhibition 'Discovering Thomas Moore: Ireland in nineteenth-century Europe'. Curated by musicologist Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB, the exhibition exposes the breadth of Moore’s research and writing about Ireland and explores Moore’s role as an Irish writer with an international reputation in positioning Ireland within Europe through cultural exchange. It also addresses contemporary European fascination with the orient and Moore’s influential role in depicting eastern culture, particularly via his hugely successful work, Lalla Rookh.
    Speaker:

    Una Hunt is Professor of Music Performance Research at the TU Dublin Conservatory and, as a prominent Moore scholar, has published widely on the subject. Her seminal book: ‘Sources and Style in Moore’s Irish Melodies’ is published by Routledge. Una also enjoys a flourishing career as an international pianist and curated a 38-venue national tour of Moore’s Irish Melodies in 2008 and has since performed Moore in many prestigious international venues including Carnegie Hall, New York. Her discography of world-premiere CDs on Irish music includes the first ever complete archive of the Irish Melodies (6CD box set: My Gentle Harp, 2008) and a collection of the songs performed with a period instrument – Moore’s Irish Melodies, the Square Piano Recordings (2009). She compiled the multi-media outputs for the exhibition first shown at the Royal Irish Academy: My Gentle Harp – Moore’s Irish Melodies, 1808-2008, which was subsequently toured across Ireland and viewed by 100,000 people.

    Una is also an award-winning radio producer and presenter and has compiled numerous features for the BBC and RTE, including the 6-programme series: My Gentle Harp. She is presently collaborating with Wexford Festival Opera to mount a performance of The Veiled Prophet opera by Irish composer, Charles Villiers Stanford, based on Moore’s oriental romance, Lalla Rookh.
    Other lectures in this series:

    9 October, 2019: ‘Re-imagining Moore’ by Prof. Harry White, MRIA, School of Music, UCD

    30 October, 2019: ‘Thomas Moore in Paris’ by Dr Tríona O'Hanlon, Independent Scholar

    6 November, 2019: ‘Genius of the East? Moore's Orientalism’ by Dr Daniel Roberts, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    13 November, 2019: ‘Sentiment and song in Moore's Irish melodies and Lalla Rookh’ by Dr Sarah McCleave, School of Arts, English & Languages, QUB

    • 34 min

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