76 episodes

A weekly podcast from the writers of rvfamilytravelatlas.com, focusing on topics that relate to RV family travel. We review campgrounds, discuss tips and tricks for traveling with kids, and answer our readers' most common questions. We also chat about food, gear, and those times when everything doesn't quite go as planned.

The RV Atlas Podcast RVFTA Podcast Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 523 Ratings

A weekly podcast from the writers of rvfamilytravelatlas.com, focusing on topics that relate to RV family travel. We review campgrounds, discuss tips and tricks for traveling with kids, and answer our readers' most common questions. We also chat about food, gear, and those times when everything doesn't quite go as planned.

    6 Amazing Camping Breakfasts from “The Family Camp Cookbook”

    6 Amazing Camping Breakfasts from “The Family Camp Cookbook”

    Who doesn't love eating a delicious breakfast at the campground? We certainly do! Some mornings we keep it light and simple, especially if we are heading out for a hike or an active adventure on the water. But other mornings we love to laze around at the campground and make a big breakfast. There is simply nothing quite like the sound and smell of bacon sizzling on the Blackstone, or the simple pleasure of flipping a huge pancake onto a child's plate. Emily Vikre's brand new book The Family Camp Cookbook is absolutely jam packed with delicous camping breakfasts that will satisfy your entire family.







    This delightful book also includes chapters on "Lunches and Foods on the Go," "Dinner," and "Treats and Drinks." But the focus of the latest episode of The RV Atlas podcast is on camping breakfasts. We were pleased to invite Emily on the show to share six of her favorite camping breakfasts from The Family Camp Cookbook. Each and every one of them made us incredibly hungry and we plan on making all of them at the campground this year!



    Emily is the author of Camp Cocktails: Easy, Fun, & Delicious Drinks For the Great Outdoors and of the aforementioned The Family Camp Cookbook: Easy, Fun, and Delicious Meals to Enjoy Outdoors, both published by Harvard Common Press. She is also the co-founder and CEO of Vikre Distillery, "an award-winning craft distillery in Duluth, Minnesota."







    To listen to Jeremy interview Emily Vikre about six amazing camping breakfasts from her new book, The Family Camp Cookbook, please click on the media player above. Or subscribe to The RV Atlas podcast wherever you get your shows!  Or read on for two great sample recipes that we have excerpted from Emily's book! To check out all of the amazing recipes in The Family Camp Cookbook, or Camp Cocktails, click on the links and purchase copies for your own camping library today!



    Recipe and text for both recipes below by Emily Vikre. Excerpted with permission from the author and publisher.



    The Best Fluffy Pancakes (Makes about 16 pancakes)









    I grew up with Norwegian pancakes, which differ from American pancakes in a whole host of ways. To wit, they are not at all fluffy. They are thin and eggy, rather crepe-like, in fact. They are usually spread with jam. And, they are usually eaten for supper, not breakfast. Anyway, the only time we had American pancakes was when we were camping and my dad was cooking them. They were most definitely made from a mix. I never liked them much. Many years later, I was writing a regular food column on breakfast, and I decided it was time to reintroduce myself to American pancakes with an eye toward finding a recipe I loved. After trying many, many pancakes, I came down in the yogurt pancake camp. A thick, whole milk yogurt makes the batter fantastically rich and tangy, yielding a fluffier and more flavorful pancake.



    Ingredients

    Dry Ingredients



    1½ cups (188 g) all-purpose flour

    ½ teaspoon salt

    2 teaspoons baking powder

    ½ teaspoon baking soda

    ½ teaspoon cinnamon



    Wet Ingredients

    2 large eggs

    2 cups (460 g) full-fat thick yogurt

    (Greek yogurt works particularly well)

    ¼ cup (50 g) sugar





    1 teaspoon vanilla

    (if you haven’t brought vanilla, you can omit this, but I

    do think it really adds to the flavor) Butter for frying



    Make It



    At Home



    Stir together all the dry ingredients until well combined and place themin an airtight container with a sealable lid or sturdy bag with a zip closure.It’s a good idea to label your container with thename of the recipe (ask mehow I know).



    In Camp



    1. In a mixing bowl, stir together the eggs, yogurt, sugar, and vanilla (ifusing) until smooth.

    • 31 min
    Meet Gustaf and the Omnia Stove Top Oven!

    Meet Gustaf and the Omnia Stove Top Oven!

    Want to do some baking at the campground but don't have a stove? The Omnia Stove is a cool cookware gadget that will let you live your baking dreams. This versatile circular oven is great for campers who don't have a built-in oven, since it is super easy to transport and to use.

    • 39 min
    An RV Trip to Cape Cod, Massachusetts With Phil Travaglia

    An RV Trip to Cape Cod, Massachusetts With Phil Travaglia

    Our camping buddy and RV Atlas correspondent, Phil Travaglia, is back on the podcast today to talk about taking an RV trip to Cape Cod! Last time he gave us an enthusiastic review of the New York City North/Newburgh KOA. This time around he is taking us back to the Cape for an epic RV trip filled with summer fun and outdoor adventure! He starts out by talking about his favorite campground on the Cape, and then shares all of his favorite activities and places to eat.



    To listen to Jeremy and Phil talk about Cape Cod and all of the fun things to do in this beautiful region of Massachusetts, click on the media player above, or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your podcasts! Or to learn a bit more about taking an RV trip to Cape Cod just keep reading! Phil shares his thoughts in the guest blog located just below…

    Atlantic Oaks Campground: Phil's Pick for an RV Trip to Cape Cod





    Guest post by Phil Travaglia



    Atlantic Oaks Campground In Eastham, Mass. on Cape Cod is one of our family favorites.  This campground is a true gem on the Cape.  The thing that sets this campground apart from any other we’ve been to is its proximity to the Cape Cod Rail Trail.  The Rail Trail is an old railway that was converted to a beautifully paved bike path that spans the length of the Cape.  This opens up an endless list of possibilities for things to do without ever getting into the car.



    The Campground is a very nice, clean campground.  They have excellent facilities.  There are very clean showers and a nice laundry facility.  There is a nice rec. room and the camp store is very well stocked and clean. The campground itself is not the attraction here. The main attraction is the Cape itself.  For this reason, the campground does not have a pool or much else.  There is a small playground behind the camp store, but that is it. The Cape is an incredible place with tons of things to do and the campground is more of a place to come back to at the end of the day.  Instead of being the focus, or the destination.



    Of note, an interesting fact about the Cape.  In 1946 there was a major brush fire that decimated over 15,000 acres of the Cape.  The winds on the Cape can be strong and they made the fire spread very rapidly.  It is for this reason that the campground very strictly enforces their fire rules.  The campfires must be out at a certain time and they will let you know if you are tardy. There are very strict town ordinances and they must comply or they can lose the permit to have fires.

    Great Food for an RV Trip to Cape Cod





    Our favorite place was Arnold's Lobster and Clam Bar.  It is a fun place that has incredible lobster rolls, great pub style food, great craft beers, a fresh raw bar, homemade ice cream and a very fun minigolf course.  The best part is that you can bike there from the campground in under 5 minutes.  Just about every night we would take our bikes for an ice cream at Arnold’s. There are too many places along the main strip on route 6 to mention them all. 



    However, another favorite of ours is the Hole in One Bakery & Coffee Shop.  This place has some of the best homemade, fresh pastries and doughnuts I’ve ever had.  There is a line around the store every morning (Do not despair, it moves quickly).  We have coffee and doughnuts from the Hole In One for breakfast a couple of times a trip. 



    Another fun and delicious place to take out some great food is Joey’s Tacos.  It is a small place that makes great food.  We actually met Joey while we were there and he told us the whole story of how he got started.  It's worth a visit if you're not sure what to eat and you want to take out a meal.



    As far as activities go, there are so many things you can do on your bikes right from the campground. 



    The Cape Cod Rail Trail abuts the back of the campground and it runs in ...

    • 48 min
    7 Amazing Campgrounds in Utah Worth Checking Out!

    7 Amazing Campgrounds in Utah Worth Checking Out!

    Utah is one of the most beautiful states for RV travel in our entire country. It's not just "The Mighty Five" that make this state great. Every inch of it seems to be photographable and otherworldly. Our guests on this episode of The RV Atlas podcast are Tyler and Kendra from oneyone.com and Campspot. Tyler and Kendra are digital nomads who have toured the American west extensively in their Airstream with their two cats Luna and Sunny. On this episode Jeremy interviews them both about six of their favorite campgrounds in Utah. Each one is unique and well-worth adding to your Utah bucket list.



    To listen to Jeremy interview Tyler and Kendra, click on the media player above, or subscribe to The RV Atlas podcast wherever you get your favorite shows!



    Tyler and Kendra's six picks for an amazing Utah Road Trip cover a wide variety of locations and campground types. Here is their list and their traveler's notes for these 7 campgrounds!  We also thank them for sharing these incredible pictures with us! 

    7 Amazing Campgrounds in Utah

    Goblin Valley State Park





    The state park is famous for its mushroom-shaped hoodoos referred to locally as goblins

    Shapes come from an erosion-resistant layer of rock on top of softer sandstone

    Campground Overview & Amenities:



    12 RV sites, 11 tent sites, group site, 2 yurts, restroom, shower facilitates

    Drinking water

    Dump station

    Hot showers

    Vault toilets

    Shaded picnic tables

    Fees:



    $35 per site, yurt $100 per site, group site is $125









    Sandstone rock formations called goblins

    open year-round

    Spring and fall are the best times to visit, summer temperatures can soar

    Things to do in the park: visitors are welcome to wander off-trail and explore the goblins, there are also miles of trails, 

    About 3.5 hours from Salt Lake City



    Dark Sky Campground





    Just 3 miles outside of Kanab, Utah

    Campground Overview & Amenities:



    18 large, pull-through RV sites on 40 acres of land

    Fiber internet

    FHU

    Outdoor furniture

    Shaded picnic table

    Spa-like bathrooms

    Community area

    $55/night





    Views of the Red Cliffs, Vermillion Cliffs, and the Kalibab Plateau

    Owners Britt, Jeff, Rick, and Meryl

    Roxor (Jeep) or bike rentals

    Propane fire pit rentals

    More info available and bookable on Campspot.com



    Fruita Campground at Capitol Reef National Park





    Surrounded by historic orchards (peaches, apples, etc.) of the national park (from pioneers settling in the area in the 1880s),

    When the fruit is ripe, staff puts out U-pick signs and you then can pay to pick

    Campground Overview & Amenities:



    71 sites

    Picnic table

    Firepits

    RV dump and drinking water station

    Restrooms with running water and flush toilets, no showers tho

    $25 per night

    Open year-round





    Reservable online for March to October camping, otherwise, from November through February, it’s first come first served

    Near some incredible hikes, we did an epic canyon hike

    Unbeatable dark skies- one of the darkest places in the US



    International Dark Sky Park







     

    Sun Outdoors Arches Gateway in Moab, Utah 





    Sun Outdoors Arches Gateway:









    Location, location, location - less than 3 miles from the entrance to Arches National Park

    Plenty of camping options: 



    Cottage rentals

    Airstream rentals

    Cabin rentals

    Pull through RV sites, FHU

    • 40 min
    Valley of Fire State Park: Spring Desert Camping (Pt. 3)

    Valley of Fire State Park: Spring Desert Camping (Pt. 3)

    These are the show notes for the third of three guest appearances by Lauren Eber, from @afamwithavan about spring desert camping in the great American west. In this three part trilogy Jeremy interviews Lauren about Joshua Tree National Park, Death Valley National Park, and Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada.







    To listen to Lauren give an overview of Valley of Fire State Park and recommend campgrounds inside and outside of the park, click here.



    Lauren loves all three of these locations dearly and she has extensive dry camping experience in all three locations with her family and their beloved van. To listen to Jeremy interview Lauren about Valley of Fire State Park, click on the media player above. Or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your podcasts. Or just read on for Lauren's extensive show notes about Valley of Fire State Park--in them she includes recommendations for camping inside and outside of the park. She also includes great recommendations for activities and a few options for great food. Thanks to Lauren for contributing such amazing content to The RV Atlas podcast!







    Guest Show Notes by Lauren Eber

    Valley of Fire State Park 





    Getting There: Only a 1 hour drive from Las Vegas, and 2 hours from Zion. Very easy stop either en route to other Western National Parks and sights or as a side trip from Vegas. From Vegas, take Highway 15 for about 50 miles and then turn right onto Valley of Fire Highway, or continue towards the town of Overton and turn right on Highway 169. The park can be accessed from either side, and there is dispersed camping outside both entrances. No park shuttle, so bring your own transportation. The park has spotty cell service, but wi-fi is available for a fee.

    Overview: Valley of Fire is a small but dramatic Nevada State Park. It is very popular, especially in spring, but totally manageable even without reservations, especially if you are open to boondocking. It features deep red sandstone rock formations, ancient petroglyphs, and petrified trees, and is definitely worthy of the trip. It makes a very convenient stopping point on the way to better known parks, but it is a star in its own right. Summer temperatures regularly exceed 100F and stay high even at night, so stick to the shoulder seasons. 



     

    Camping In and Around Valley of Fire State Park









    State Park Campgrounds in the Park: The park has 2 official campgrounds, Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock. Atlatl Rock is the main campground, has flush toilets and showers, shade structures, fire pits, flat tent pads, and even has about 20 sites with water and electric hookups and a dump station, a few pull-throughs, can fit RVs up to 35 feet. Arch rock is smaller, with pit toilets and no showers, and geared toward tent camping. Both campgrounds are first-come, first-served and fill up quickly, especially on weekends in fall and spring. And both are surrounded by beautiful red rock formations.

    Dispersed Camping / Boondocking Outside the Park: One of the best things about Valley of Fire State Park is the ample availability of easy boondocking on public lands outside the park. When dispersed camping, it is important to leave no trace. Camp on previously impacted areas, preferably with stone fire rings that other campers have left there before, and pack out all of your trash and waste. There are zero facilities, so bring your own food, water, and bathroom (or a good shovel). There are three possible areas to conveniently dispersed camp near Valley of Fire. 



    The first, and our top recommendation, is the Snowbird Mesa, aka Poverty Flats, area off of Highway 169, near Overton. This is a very popular and easily accessible boondocking area, with many people who come here over and over and stay a while. If you’ve never tried dispersed camping before,

    • 37 min
    Death Valley National Park: Spring Desert Camping (Pt. 2)

    Death Valley National Park: Spring Desert Camping (Pt. 2)

    These are the show notes for the second of three guest appearances by Lauren Eber, from @afamwithavan about spring desert camping in the great American west. In this three part trilogy Jeremy interviews Lauren about Joshua Tree National Park, Death Valley National Park, and Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada.



    Lauren Eber and her family enjoying a visit to Death Valley National Park.



     



    To listen to Lauren give an overview of Joshua Tree National Park and recommend campgrounds inside and outside of the park, click here.



    Lauren loves all three of these locations dearly and she has extensive dry camping experience in all three locations with her family and their beloved van. To listen to Jeremy interview Lauren about Death Valley National Park, click on the media player above. Or subscribe to the The RV Atlas wherever you get your podcasts. Or just read on for Lauren's extensive show notes about Death Valley National Park--in them she includes recommendations for camping inside and outside of the park. She also includes great recommendations for activities and a few options for great food. She will be back again with an overview of Valley of Fire this week! Stay tuned for the last episode in the trilogy!



    Guest Show Notes by Lauren Eber

    Death Valley National Park





    Getting There: About a 2 hour drive from Las Vegas and a 4.5 hour drive from Los Angeles. The central area in the park is the Furnace Creek Visitor’s Center. Start here with a pass through the visitor’s center to get your bearings and pick up a map before heading out to the park’s top sites.

    Overview: Death Valley is literally one of the hottest places on earth, and drier than the Sahara desert, with almost zero humidity. It hit a record high of 130 degrees in 2020. It contains the lowest point in North America, Badwater Basin, at -282 feet. It’s only a couple hours drive from Badwater to the highest point in the Continental U.S., Mt. Whitney, at 14,505 feet. Death Valley is the largest National Park outside of Alaska, with many different regions. It is beautiful and other-worldly. It definitely deserves a spot on your bucket list.

    Campgrounds



    Furnace Creek Campground is the largest and most centrally located campground in the park, reservable from October 15-April 15 (so that’s when you should go), and it has 18 full-hookup sites, but they book up almost instantaneously, 6 months in advance. Some spots have some vegetation for a little privacy, but the landscape doesn’t really lend itself to privacy, so expect to see your neighbors, even with relatively spacious sites. (150 sites; water; flush toilets; some full-hookup sites)

    Texas Springs is also located at Furnace Creek and is a good place to stay. 

    If all of the other campgrounds in the park are full, there is overflow at Sunset Campground in Furnace Creek. It is just a big parking lot, not at all scenic, but it is centrally located for sightseeing. Try to avoid this option, but it’s better than nothing as a base for seeing the park.

    NPS campgrounds outside of Furnace Creek - some of these are at higher elevations and may have cooler temps (distances from Furnace Creek in parentheses): Stovepipe Wells (30 mins, very basic campground, in the Stovepipe Wells area), Mesquite Spring (1 hr 15 min, Northern part of the park, near Scotty’s Castle, which is closed until further notice), Emigrant (tent only, 40 min), Wildrose (1 hr 15 min, vehicles under 25 feet, in Emigrant Canyon, at 4,100 feet elevation), Thorndike (1 hr 30 min, high clearance vehicles under 25 feet, in Emigrant Canyon, 7,400 feet elevation), Mahogany Flat (1 hr 45 min, in Emigrant Canyon, high clearance vehicles under 25 feet, 8,400 feet elevation, shady)

    Stovepipe Wells RV Park is a small, privately owned option inside the park with hookups, restaurant, saloon,

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
523 Ratings

523 Ratings

Megh's box ,

My sentimental fave

This was the very first podcast I started listening to when we bought our travel trailer years ago. Stephanie and Jeremy were out providing high-quality content years before it was cool or hip or trendy. They are trailblazers. I’ve even met and listened to Jeremy speak in person at an RV show. Things have changed a bit as their careers have morphed but they are still my #1 source for info when I am planning or dreaming about a trip. I never miss an episode and frequently dive back into their show catalogue to listen to old ones. I wish they would put out as many episodes as other RV podcasters but I understand why they don’t. Their 2 most recent books are fantastic and I would recommend “See You at the Campground” for any newbie and “Where Should We Camp Next?” as a great resource for all who dream of or plan trips. Last thing—I appreciate that they are family friendly and have often played them for my little family to get us excited about a destination. We’ve been to loads of their recommended campgrounds and restaurants and obtained plenty of their recommended gear. They have never steered us wrong!

CampingMom15 ,

Love it, but a bit of feedback

I love this podcast and look forward to new episodes, and also enjoy going back to listen to old episodes of places we plan to travel. I do wish Stephanie would not talk over/interrupt Jeremy as much as she does though. There is a noticeable difference in episodes from prior years than compared to the last couple of years.

ChristaS1971 ,

Excellent podcast for those with wanderlust!

Loving this podcast! It does make me wish I had done more camping and traveling around when my kids were younger. They are in their 20s now and we all love to camp! I’m saving up for a small travel trailer, possibly as small as a teardrop for ease of use and getting out there! Just picked up your book from my local bookstore in Memphis and can’t wait to dive in and make some plans!!! P.S. I too have a camping gear addiction....2nd place to actually being in the woods and nature is being in an REI!

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