116 episodes

The Show On The Road features interviews and exclusive acoustic performances with songwriters, bandleaders and musicians from around the world. Hosted by Dustbowl Revival's Z. Lupetin, each episode features an in-depth and playfully creative conversation about the real day to day lives of artists and their inspirations.

The Show On The Road with Z. Lupetin Z. Lupetin

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 80 Ratings

The Show On The Road features interviews and exclusive acoustic performances with songwriters, bandleaders and musicians from around the world. Hosted by Dustbowl Revival's Z. Lupetin, each episode features an in-depth and playfully creative conversation about the real day to day lives of artists and their inspirations.

    Brandy Clark

    Brandy Clark

    This week, we bring you a conversation with one of Nashville’s supreme songwriters: Brandy Clark.

    Born in a logging town in Washington state, Clark started playing guitar at age nine before setting it aside and getting a scholarship for basketball. Music kept tugging her back in though. Reba recorded two of her songs in “Cry" and "The Day She Got Divorced" (like a modern Patsy Cline, Brandy has a knack for nailing a heartbreaker) and she soon found a valuable mentor in Marty Stuart, who helped her make her Opry debut in 2012.

    While you may just be learning about Clark’s stellar solo work which mixes old school and witty new school country with some of the tightest pop hooks in the game, Clark has quietly been co-writing for some of country and rock’s leading ladies for years, like Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves, LeAnn Rimes and Sheryl Crow to name a few. But it was with her lyrically masterful, lushly-orchestrated 2020 LP Your Life Is A Record that doors started opening in a whole new way. 2021 saw an extended cut deluxe version drop.

    In this unearthed conversation (blame a faulty hard-drive), we go through her darkest breakup songs, hear about her tastiest kiss-offs and discuss her unique perspective of Nashville’s Music Row Boys’ Club.

    Don’t miss the end of the taping when Brandy discusses teaming up with her songwriting hero Randy Newman on the cheeky tune “Bigger Boat” and she plays an exclusive acoustic performance.

    This episode of The Show On The Road is brought to you by WYLD Gallery: an Austin, Texas-based art gallery that exclusively features works by Native American artists. Find unique gifts for your loved ones this holiday season and support Indigenous artists at the same time. Pieces at ALL price points are available at wyld.gallery

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    • 59 min
    Hayes Carll

    Hayes Carll

    This week, we get on the horn with renowned Texas-born singer and deeply observational songwriter Hayes Carll, who is celebrating the release of his seventh LP, the atmospheric country-tinted You Get It All.

    While some may just be discovering Hayes’ lived-in songs which are often spun with dark humor (he admits John Prine and Jimmy Buffett were early inspirations), next year marks the twentieth anniversary of his first album Flowers and Liquor which he wrote while still in college in Arkansas. His acclaimed follow-up Little Rock (2005) remains one of the only self-released albums to make to #1 on the Americana chart. 

    Hard-charging years on the road and humble years before, getting by working long nights at Chili’s, Red Lobster and more, made Hayes truly appreciate when his star in the roots circuit began rising. His tongue-and-cheek country kiss off “She Left Me For Jesus” off his breakout major label debut Trouble In Mind (2008) might have shocked mainstream radio programmers, but it brought in a whole new wave of fans who have been diligently following him across the world ever since. KMAG YOYO & Other American Stories came in 2011 and pulled even fewer punches - showing his knack for a devastating hook. "KMAG YOYO" is army-speak for "Kiss my ass, guys, you're on your own."

    Some artists may bring their wives into the studio as a cute cameo now and again, but Carll is lucky enough to have artist and sought-after producer Allison Moorer on the home team. Together with Kenny Greenberg, she helped bring out a softer, deeper side of Carll on the newest You Get It All - with the standout heartbreaker “Help Me Remember” centering on his experience watching his grandfather in Texas drift away with dementia. 

    Maybe the most fun on the new record comes from the rollicking opener “Nice Things” - which reveals why Carll may not be getting on right-leaning pop-country radio anytime soon, while still winning legions of listeners anyway: it’s a countrified conversation between God and her screwed up human subjects on earth... and God is a frustrated (and rightly so) lady. 


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    • 1 hr 7 min
    The Felice Brothers

    The Felice Brothers

    This week, we call into the Catskills of New York for a deep conversation with James Felice: accordionist, pianist, songwriter and co-founder of fun-house-mirror Americana group The Felice Brothers. 

    James started the band with his brothers (poet lead singer Ian) and percussionist Simone in 2006 as a busking folk pop experiment with a literary rebel streak within the subways of New York City. They’ve joined roots-pop luminaries like Bright Eyes at venues as storied as Radio City Music Hall - but somehow the gritty, back-alley bar seems like their natural habitat. Ian, James and their longtime quartet (Will Lawrence and bassist Jesske Hume round out the band) returned after years of hibernation to release their daring party-through-the-apocalypse rollercoaster of a new LP From Dreams To Dust in 2021 on Yep Roc Records.

    Some bands record at home, or maybe in tricked-out cabins or plush studios, but The Felice Brothers seem to make records that use their unique and often bizarre surroundings as an added character in the band. Their beloved self-titled record, which came out 2008, feels like a gin-soaked saloon party where Hemingway and Lou Reed and Sly Stone would join in on swaying sing-alongs besides a sweat-soaked piano. It was somehow recorded in a converted chicken coop, while their brassy, bizarro-rock romp Celebration, Florida (2011) was recorded in a booming high school gymnasium. “Honda Civic” is a musical-theater-esque favorite, with an explosion at the local Wonder Bread warehouse taking center stage in the narrative. Does any of it make sense? Does it matter?

    Their newest work is a more emotional, sonically lush, storytelling driven operation, having been recorded in a church in Harlemville, New York with award-winning mixer Mike Mogis at the helm. Mortality takes the spotlight. Ian Felice is in rare form here, spitting more words and setting more strange scenes per song than most slam-poets or absurdist playwrights. The lead song “Jazz On The Autobahn” has become a staple on Americana radio, showcasing what TFB have always done best: taking their listeners on a white-knuckle ride that has no predicable end or resolve in sight. 


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    • 53 min
    Pokey LaFarge

    Pokey LaFarge

    This week, we bring you an in-depth dive with vintage roots-n-soul excavator and beloved Illinois-born songwriter Pokey LaFarge. With his trusty guitar on his lap during the talk, taped in his LA breakfast nook, we go through the making of his funky and cheerful new LP In The Blossom of Their Shade.

    For the last decade and change, Pokey LaFarge (born Andrew Heissler in Bloomington-Normal) has criss-crossed the globe making his own brand of historic-minded, literary-tinged folk blues. Europe, especially, has become a second home. From his fashion sense, to his high-cutting delivery, LaFarge seems like he could have stepped out of a road show with Hank Williams and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, and yet, rock luminaries like Jack White saw something deeper than just a player of old-time covers. Opening for White got LaFarge in front of huge crowds, and standout records like the danceable Something In The Water (2015) and the darker Rock Bottom Rhapsody (2020) saw him transition from front-porch country folk to muscular jangly rock-n-soul.

    Out on his own from a young age, Pokey began busking to get by and soon teamed up with the South City Three to create his first run of albums in 2009. 

    If there’s a few things that helped his more uplifting 2021 LP In The Blossom of Their Shade come to be, they may have been falling in love again, rediscovering his faith in a higher power, and taking plenty of power naps during his songwriting sessions. During the pandemic, Pokey also began helping the local homeless community in LA.

    Stick around to hear an exclusive acoustic performance of his single “Get It ’Fore It’s Gone”.  


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    • 52 min
    Silvana Estrada

    Silvana Estrada

    This week, to help celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, we bring you conversation with a rising star in folklorico-pop hailing from Veracruz, Mexico: Silvana Estrada.

    Currently on her first tour of the United States opening for Rodrigo y Gabriela, Estrada has already made a name for herself in Mexico, renown for her deft finger-picking on the Cuatro, and her ever-bending, darting vocal mastery. Songs from her first EP including the soaring electronic-beat driven “El Guardo” have been listened to over twenty million times and counting - and a collaboration with Mexican roots-rock hero Natalie Lafourcade came last year too. 

    At only 24, Estrada, the daughter of two instrument makers, is just coming into her own as a songwriter, dipping into her love affairs and private passions with a true clear-eyed poet's pen. Singles off her debut album Marchita for Glassnote Records have already landed to great acclaim, and she’s the label's first Spanish-language signing ever. Look no further than the heartbreaker “Tristeza” for a first taste of her rustic, primordial sound. 


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    • 58 min
    Asleep at the Wheel (Ray Benson)

    Asleep at the Wheel (Ray Benson)

    This week, we bring you a half-century-spanning talk with the Grammy-winning ringleader of one of American roots music’s most durable and iconic bands, Ray Benson of Asleep at the Wheel. The episode is a celebration of their fifty years of diligent song collecting, Western swing camaraderie and epic genre-spanning collaboration - and features first listens of their new record Half a Hundred Years which drops on October 1. The record covers old classics and tells new stories, with spritely cameos from fellow Texans Lyle Lovett and Willie Nelson.


    Aligning behind Benson’s commanding, deep voice and impeccable song-historian’s taste, Ray has managed what few bandleaders in country music - or any genre - have: keeping a talented rotating band of mostly-acoustic players together from 1972 on, with little break from the road. Willie Nelson and others have long championed their work, and indeed the band had fans in even higher places: on September 11, 2001, the group was set to perform at The White House.


    Asleep at the Wheel’s story is really one of perseverance and transformation. How did a Jewish kid from the the Philly suburbs end up as a Texas cowboy music icon who toured with Bob Dylan and George Strait (just ask Bob about changing identities), wrote songs and acted in movies with Dolly Parton and Blondie, and became the foremost interpreter of the rollicking music of Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys? Only in America, you could say - but Ray would just tell you that he loves the music deep in his bones, and it’s what he wakes up every day to create and save.


    One of the most forward-thinking things Ray did from the very beginning was share the mic with a myriad of talented female vocalists, which maybe confused some radio programmers (who is leader of this outfit?) but made the road shows eternally entertaining and unique. That tradition continues. Also featured on the new record are lovely collabs with Lee Ann Womack and Emmylou Harris.



    Support this podcast at — https://redcircle.com/the-show-on-the-road-with-z-lupetin1106/donations

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    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
80 Ratings

80 Ratings

Pedie100s ,

Thoughtful and incisive

Great conversations that dig beyond the surface. Great selection of guests, too

JenGrooveDC ,

For All Music Lovers Everywhere

Zac is a great curator, mixing it up with artists from different genres and generations. He’s introduced me to a range of musicians and deepened my appreciation of artists I already knew. His conversations are wonderful explorations of the communal humanity and individuality of music. Bravo!
And a warm shoutout to his band- Dustbowl Revival - first introduced to me years ago at the Rhythm & Roots Festival in Bristol, VA. Great venue and wide range of musical talents!

Wily Trax ,

Good show/Good interviewer

With lot of other podcasts I will fast forward through the host's pre interview blah, blah, blah, but Zac's intros and insight are great to listen to. A really good podcast.

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