176 episodes

The Sons of History podcast is all about giving historical references and engaging dialogue about what is happening today and why it’s happening.

The Sons Of History The Sons Of History

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 117 Ratings

The Sons of History podcast is all about giving historical references and engaging dialogue about what is happening today and why it’s happening.

    Pushing Back on Woke Comics with Rippaverse Comics Creator Eric July

    Pushing Back on Woke Comics with Rippaverse Comics Creator Eric July

    Are you tired of the woke agenda in comics, like Marvel and DC? The culture war has been ongoing and Eric July is mounting an assault on the comic book world that looks to move comics back to good stories, great characters, and a universe that actually makes sense. July is the founder and creator of Rippaverse Comics, and his first comic "Isom" has taken the comic world by storm. He joined the show to discuss the current woke trends in comics and comic hero movies, how the big corporations like Disney are ruining what was once a great thing, and how "Isom" has far exceeded even his expectations.

    Eric July is the creator of YoungRippa59 on YouTube, the front man for the metal band Backwordz, and the creator of Rippaverse Comics. 

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    • 1 hr 28 min
    Caesar, Cato, and How Partisanship Destroyed the Republic with Josiah Osgood

    Caesar, Cato, and How Partisanship Destroyed the Republic with Josiah Osgood

    Historians often point to the similarities between Rome and America. Both are republics. One fell and the other appears to be on its way. How much did partisan politics impact the demise of the Roman Republic? Josiah Osgood, historian and author of “Uncommon Wrath: How Caesar and Cato’s Deadly Rivalry Destroyed the Roman Republic,” joins the podcast to discuss how two great and influential politicians ruined a really good thing.

    Josiah Osgood is Professor of Classics at Georgetown University. He has published several books including, Caesar's Legacy: Civil War and the Emergence of the Roman Empire (Cambridge, 2006), Turia: A Roman Woman's Civil War (Oxford, 2014), Rome and the Making of a World State, 150 BCE - 20 CE (Cambridge, 2018), How to Stop a Conspiracy: An Ancient Guide to Saving a Republic by Sallust; and his latest Uncommon Wrath: How Caesar and Cato’s Deadly Rivalry Destroyed the Roman Republic.

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    • 1 hr 35 min
    Why Do Americans Love Crony Capitalism? with guest Thomas DiLorenzo

    Why Do Americans Love Crony Capitalism? with guest Thomas DiLorenzo

    How come so many Americans suddenly accept crony capitalism? Thomas DiLorenzo, author and senior fellow at The Mises Institute, joins the podcast to discuss the varying schools of economics, the history of crony capitalism, how Americans have typically always been against it until the recent pandemic with big pharma and the shuttering of small businesses in favor of large corporations, as well as the obvious relationship between governments and the climate change community (their push to end industries, like coal and oil, as well as their push to move everyone to electric vehicles and more).

    Thomas DiLorenzo is a former professor of economics at Loyola University Maryland and a member of the senior faculty of the Mises Institute. He is the author of How Capitalism Saved America; Hamilton's Curse; Organized Crime: The Unvarnished Truth About Government; The Problem with Socialism; and The Problem with Lincoln.

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    • 1 hr 25 min
    Where Have All the Statesmen Gone? with guest Daniel J. Mahoney

    Where Have All the Statesmen Gone? with guest Daniel J. Mahoney

    What does it mean to be a statesman and who in the past can we look to for those examples? Daniel J. Mahoney, the author of “The Statesman As Thinker,” joins the podcast to discuss why America needs more statesmen rather than politicians, and what it takes to become a statesman.

    In the same vain as Plutarch's Lives, Mahoney has assembled a number of historical figures who were or became great statesmen during times of crises. We go all the way back to the end of the 18th century and venture up to the modern age. These political figures are from various regions of the world, enduring varying circumstances that made them rise to the top.

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    • 1 hr 35 min
    Welcome to the End of the World…Seriously with guest Peter Zeihan

    Welcome to the End of the World…Seriously with guest Peter Zeihan

    Peter Zeihan, one of today’s most prominent geopolitical strategists, has mapped out how the world as we know it is about to come to an end in his newest book "The End of the World Is Just the Beginning: Mapping the Collapse of Globalization." FYI: The results are not good. See which nations will crumble, which ones won’t, and which ones will do better than most. SPOILER ALERT: No nation comes out unscathed.

    Why is the world as we know it coming to an end? Historical decisions have led the world's nations to this point - from population decreases to trade issues to food shortages, it appears to all be closing in now. This is why history is so important - it can help predict the future to prepare for it (at least as best as possible). 

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    • 1 hr 30 min
    What We've Gotten Wrong About the Hundred Years War with Dr. Michael Livingston

    What We've Gotten Wrong About the Hundred Years War with Dr. Michael Livingston

    Understanding history is often contingent on geography. That's never more true than in military history where the location of a battle helps tell the whole story. Dr. Michael Livingston, professor at The Citadel military academy and the author of "Crécy: Battle of Five Kings," joined the podcast to discuss how centuries of hearsay and unwalked battlefields have led historians to get one of the most famous battles of the Hundred Years War wrong. Not only has this led to misunderstanding the battle, but also the entire war and its historical figures - from kings to soldiers.

    What if the Battle of Crécy didn't take place where it was always thought to? How would that change our perceptions of the military tactics of the French and English? How would it change our views of its kings? And how would it change our views on one of Europe's most important and longest conflicts - The Hundred Years War? Our interview discusses all of that and more.

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    • 1 hr 12 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
117 Ratings

117 Ratings

tvc1976 ,

History made interesting!

Love these guys! Learn so much because they make history interesting. Keep up the great work. Thanks!

RyanRaySr ,

Great show

Dustin and Alan do a great job bringing on interesting guests and navigating the messy world that is history.

Gucciubear2302 ,

Great podcast

Great podcast! Highly recommend if you love history or if you want to learn a little more since most schools aren’t really teaching it.

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