248 episodes

"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth called an experiment to discover how far the language of everyday conversation is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure. With this publication, he set in motion the formal movement called "Romanticism." 220 years later the experiment is continued on this podcast. This podcast seeks to reach those of us who wish to improve our inner world, increase our stores of happiness, and yet not succumb to the mystical or the subjective.Here, in this place of the imagination, you will find many conversation with those humans creating things that interest the human mind.

The Troubadour Podcast Kirk j Barbera

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 23 Ratings

"It is the honourable characteristic of Poetry that its materials are to be found in every subject which can interest the human mind." William Wordsworth The Troubadour Podcast invites you into a world where art is conversation and conversation is art. The conversations on this show will be with some living people and some dead writers of our past. I aim to make both equally entertaining and educational.In 1798 William Wordsworth and Samuel Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, which Wordsworth called an experiment to discover how far the language of everyday conversation is adapted to the purpose of poetic pleasure. With this publication, he set in motion the formal movement called "Romanticism." 220 years later the experiment is continued on this podcast. This podcast seeks to reach those of us who wish to improve our inner world, increase our stores of happiness, and yet not succumb to the mystical or the subjective.Here, in this place of the imagination, you will find many conversation with those humans creating things that interest the human mind.

    Surprised by Art: Social Harmony

    Surprised by Art: Social Harmony

    Shortly after the recording of this episode, Luc Travers posted this to the facebook group: 

    "Oh man, that episode recording was a wild, emotional ride!
    I went from warm nostalgia, to eager hope, to anxiety, to confused anger, to relief, to relative serenity in the space of 45 minutes!"

    Kirk agrees. This was an intense episode that dealt with a very heavy topic. What is social harmony? On this episode, you'll hear a variety of different answers, including two radically different approaches by two different artists.

    Special thanks to our voice recording volunteers: 

    Alexandra Hartline
    Heather Schwarz
    Mike Dartt

    • 59 min
    Surprised by Art: Romantic Spark

    Surprised by Art: Romantic Spark

    Not only did Luc and Kirk discuss the topic of romance, but they discussed rom-coms, read some Shakespeare, talked about literature and of course were surprised by the painting that Luc chose and the poem Kirk chose.

    What do you think is a romantic spark? When does it happen? How does it happen?

    Special thanks to our voice recording guests
    Patrick Reasonover of justaddfirewater.com
    Emily Meer from the Surprised by Art Facebook Group
    Hillary Romero from Hilco Homes

    View the painting here: https://www.troubadourmag.com/post/surprised-by-art-5-romantic-spark

    • 36 sec
    Surprised by Art: Self-Creation

    Surprised by Art: Self-Creation

    Today Luc and Kirk are joined by sculptor Kelsy Landin. Make sure to follow her on Tiktok @landinart where she has become very popular creating videos of the sculpting process. Instagram she is @landinofficial and youtube Landin Art.

    Luc chose a spectacular statue to surprise us with. All three of us discussed various aspects of the sculpture as well as its artistic meaning. At first, it was not obvious how it fit into the topic of "Self-creation" but after exploring the work with Luc, we saw a very unique and important aspect of creating the self that many of us do not consider.

    The poem showed a contrary view to the idea of Self-creation, which gave the three of us much to contemplate.

    Enjoy this special episode of Surprised by Art, and visit https://www.troubadourmag.com/post/surprised-by-art-8-self-creation to view all the of artworks from different angles, and to read the poem.

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Surprised by Art: (Secular) Revelation

    Surprised by Art: (Secular) Revelation

    This week Luc and Kirk delve into the religious concept of revelation. Does revelation refer solely to the divine? How can revelation be brought down to earth? How is it relevant to our day-to-day lives? In painting, revelation is a very popular concept. The same is true in literature and poetry. What do you think? Does revelation have to be divine? Can we attain secular revelation? And what would that mean?

    Special thanks to our voice recorders
    Kelly Bowers & Sean Doherty.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Easter, 1916 by WB Yeats

    Easter, 1916 by WB Yeats

    A reading and discussion of the poem "Easter, 1916" by WB Yeats. This poem is considered one of the most powerful political poems of the 20th century.

    Easter, 1916
    BY WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS

    I have met them at close of day   
    Coming with vivid faces
    From counter or desk among grey   
    Eighteenth-century houses.
    I have passed with a nod of the head   
    Or polite meaningless words,   
    Or have lingered awhile and said   
    Polite meaningless words,
    And thought before I had done   
    Of a mocking tale or a gibe   
    To please a companion
    Around the fire at the club,   
    Being certain that they and I   
    But lived where motley is worn:   
    All changed, changed utterly:   
    A terrible beauty is born.

    That woman's days were spent   
    In ignorant good-will,
    Her nights in argument
    Until her voice grew shrill.
    What voice more sweet than hers   
    When, young and beautiful,   
    She rode to harriers?
    This man had kept a school   
    And rode our wingèd horse;   
    This other his helper and friend   
    Was coming into his force;
    He might have won fame in the end,   
    So sensitive his nature seemed,   
    So daring and sweet his thought.
    This other man I had dreamed
    A drunken, vainglorious lout.
    He had done most bitter wrong
    To some who are near my heart,   
    Yet I number him in the song;
    He, too, has resigned his part
    In the casual comedy;
    He, too, has been changed in his turn,   
    Transformed utterly:
    A terrible beauty is born.

    Hearts with one purpose alone   
    Through summer and winter seem   
    Enchanted to a stone
    To trouble the living stream.
    The horse that comes from the road,   
    The rider, the birds that range   
    From cloud to tumbling cloud,   
    Minute by minute they change;   
    A shadow of cloud on the stream   
    Changes minute by minute;   
    A horse-hoof slides on the brim,   
    And a horse plashes within it;   
    The long-legged moor-hens dive,   
    And hens to moor-cocks call;   
    Minute by minute they live:   
    The stone's in the midst of all.

    Too long a sacrifice
    Can make a stone of the heart.   
    O when may it suffice?
    That is Heaven's part, our part   
    To murmur name upon name,   
    As a mother names her child   
    When sleep at last has come   
    On limbs that had run wild.   
    What is it but nightfall?
    No, no, not night but death;   
    Was it needless death after all?
    For England may keep faith   
    For all that is done and said.   
    We know their dream; enough
    To know they dreamed and are dead;   
    And what if excess of love   
    Bewildered them till they died?   
    I write it out in a verse—
    MacDonagh and MacBride   
    And Connolly and Pearse
    Now and in time to be,
    Wherever green is worn,
    Are changed, changed utterly:   
    A terrible beauty is born.
    Notes:
    September 25, 1916

    • 43 min
    Surprised by Art: Aloneness

    Surprised by Art: Aloneness

    is there a difference between aloneness and loneliness? What are the benefits and drawbacks to being alone? Our two artists today have very different things to say about being alone and loneliness. You may be listening to this alone. But are you alone with Luc and Kirk in your ears? There are times when it is important to break away from others and be by yourself. But there are times when connection is a strong desire. 

    This and more is what we explore on this episode of Surprised by Art!

    *Note to parents. Kirk uses one swear word in this episode!

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Jrivas1 ,

Perfect for the poetry novice!

I’ve never been a fan of poetry. I found it confusing and boring. However, Kirk’s ability to make poems relevant and easy to understand helped me appreciate the true beauty behind poetic words. Great concept!

spgumm ,

The Title Says It All...

Kirk is a natural and inspirational teacher. As an avid reader, and one who has learned more from”non-business” books than many business books, I’m thrilled to hear how Kirk related literature to life. This is a great podcast for anyone looking to live a better life.

Linda Tucker ,

Challenge Your Beliefs/Challenge Your Thinking

Thank you for challenging peoples thinking, Kirk…Great concept podcast!

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