80 episodes

The Wired Homeschool provides practical advice for homeschooling parents who use technology as part of their homeschool curriculum. Topics include STEM education, responsible Internet use for families, and how to apply the use of digital devices and media to homeschooling. In addition to instructional content, you’ll find articles and podcasts on topics like homeschooling philosophy, how the digital age influences our daily lives, and product reviews.

The Wired Homeschool John Wilkerson

    • Education for Kids
    • 4.7 • 35 Ratings

The Wired Homeschool provides practical advice for homeschooling parents who use technology as part of their homeschool curriculum. Topics include STEM education, responsible Internet use for families, and how to apply the use of digital devices and media to homeschooling. In addition to instructional content, you’ll find articles and podcasts on topics like homeschooling philosophy, how the digital age influences our daily lives, and product reviews.

    Before Handing Your Child a Device for Christmas

    Before Handing Your Child a Device for Christmas

    Are you planning to give your child a smartphone, tablet, or console this holiday season? Before you wrap it (if you haven’t already) consider doing a few things first.















    Set Expectations







    The number one piece of advice I give parents when buying their child a device is to set expectations. You need to decide what kind of restrictions you’ll put in place and how you want it to be used. Will you limit how often and how long they’re allowed to use it? Will you limit the types of games they’re allowed to play? All of these things should be thought about before you give them the device so you can set their expectations after they receive it.







    Device Controls







    Nearly every electronic device comes with some form of parental controls. I’ve advocated for them for over 10 years and companies are finally making it easier for parents to manage how, when, and how long their children use their devices.







    Screen Time (iOS) – Apple has always had a walled garden so you’ll either need to manage your child’s device directly or use another iOS device. Screen Time has great controls and works well with Family Sharing.







    Family Link (Android) If you got your child any smartphone besides an iPhone you most-likely will use Family Link to manage parental controls. Fortunately, they have an iOS app too.







    Amazon FreeTime Fire tablets, TVs, and even Alexa-enable devices can be managed with Amazon’s FreeTime. In my experience, Amazon has the weakest controls.







    Consoles: The Nintendo Switch and XBox both have dedicated apps that you can use to manage parental controls on their consoles. Sony’s Playstation requires you to use a browser or its general Playstation app.







    Network Controls







    For whole-house Internet controls you can turn to your router or a secondary device. If you’re using the router your Internet provider installed, check with them for information on parental controls. I suggest either a second router for the kids or Circle by Disney.







    Circle Home Plus – The Circle Home Plus device connects with your router to manage every Internet-connected device on your home network.







    Home Router – Every home router these days has some level of parental controls. Check your manufacturer’s website for instructions to configure those settings.







    Software and Apps







    No solution will fully protect you and your children so if you need to take a belt and suspenders approach I recommend installing an app on their device for additional monitoring.







    Covenant Eyes – I’ve been an advocate (and affiliate) for Covenant Eyes for over a decade. They’re the gold-standard when it comes to monitoring and filtering.







    Accountable2You – If you’re looking for the best bang for your buck, Accountable2You has got you covered. It occasionally triggers false alarms but I’ve still found it to be a useful tool.



















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    • 15 min
    MySchool: A Tech Tool for Homeschoolers with Justin Shell

    MySchool: A Tech Tool for Homeschoolers with Justin Shell

    One of the most difficult things for new homeschoolers, and even some experienced homeschoolers, is finding community resources that are friendly to homeschoolers.







    MySchool is a community-driven resource that connects parents to homeschool spots (like museums, co-ops, and nature centers). It’s like an Airbnb for home education.



















    Justin Shell started MySchool after he and his wife started homeschooling and were looking for locations and activities for their children.







    Homeschooling families are encouraged to sign up for MySchool and add “spots” that other homeschooling families could use for learning and social activities.







    You can follow MySchool on Twitter, join the Facebook group, or sign-up for their newsletter when you register to keep up-to-date on all their latest developments.



















    Did you enjoy this episode of The Wired Homeschool? Consider supporting the podcast when you buy me a coffee.









    Follow the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.







    Music for the podcast is “Loopster” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/







    Some of the links in the posts on this site are “affiliate links.” That means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I receive a commission. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”

    • 14 min
    Not All Online Schooling is Homeschooling

    Not All Online Schooling is Homeschooling

    Education was suddenly transformed earlier this year when schools across the world were shut down because of a single-cell organism.







    For the most part, homeschoolers were unaffected. Co-ops, field trips, social activities, and other enrichment experiences were put on hold or cancelled but the way we educated our kids really wasn’t affected. Why we decided to educate our children at home also hadn’t changed.







    Online, we were bombarded by memes from celebrities and micro-influencers about the realities of “homeschooling”. Mom’s holding glasses of wine joked about teaching Algebra and teachers posted about lecturing to students in their pyjamas.







    Now, “We’re all homeschoolers,” can be heard far and wide but is it really true?















    Now, in the United States, there are in-person and online classes for public and private school students. Some parents have opted for 100% virtual classes and have declared themselves as “homeschooling”.







    There are some key differences between homeschooling and online schooling and it probably isn’t obvious to parents who were “forced” to do school at home.







    * Homeschoolers choose to educate their children at home for various reasons.* Homeschoolers pay for their online curriculum and (usually) pay school taxes too.* Homeschoolers don’t take attendance.* Homeschoolers choose their curriculum.* Homeschoolers aren’t (usually) bound by a schedule.* Homeschooling is a lifestyle.







    I applaud the teachers and parents who’ve had to adjust to doing school online. The upheaval to their normal way of doing things has been stressful and difficult.







    But there are key differences between doing school online and homeschooling. The primary one is choice.







    Homeschoolers choose this lifestyle while the teachers and parents doing school online are bound by the traditional education system.



















    Did you enjoy this episode of The Wired Homeschool? Consider supporting the podcast when you buy me a coffee.









    Follow the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.







    Music for the podcast is “Loopster” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com). Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/







    Some of the links in the posts on this site are “affiliate links.” That means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I receive a commission. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”

    • 10 min
    Homeschooling After a Pandemic

    Homeschooling After a Pandemic

    If you were forced into homeschooling because of the pandemic this year, you may be considering continuing to homeschool your children.







    Maybe you’re not comfortable with how your school district is planning to reopen or you’ve decided that this is something you think is a good fit for your family.







    In this episode of The Wired Homeschool, my wife, Lisa joins me to talk about homeschooling philosophy, curriculum, online resources, and more.







    We condense 20 years of homeschooling into a 30-minute episode. Listen in to learn what you need to know if you plan to homeschool after COVID.







    Resources mentioned (in order):







    DuckstersCathy Duffy ReviewsThe Great CoursesKhan AcademyMultiflyerMark RoberCincinnati ZooDeep Space SparkleArt for Kids HubScouter MomDanica McKellar’s Math Books







    Do you have homeschooling questions? Leave a comment below or email feedback@thewiredhomeschool.com and we’ll do our best to answer them in a future episode. You can also message us on Facebook, if you prefer.







    Be sure to follow the podcast on Instagram so you can watch my Summer STEM Series and get a free teaching guide each week.









    If you enjoyed this episode of The Wired Homeschool, consider supporting the podcast by buying me a coffee.







    Follow the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.







    Music for the podcast is “RetroFuture Clean” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/







    Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. In some cases, I may have been given a free sample of a product to review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsement.

    Kirk Martin (Encore)

    Kirk Martin (Encore)

    This month’s encore episode is an interview with Kirk Martin from October 2017.







    Kirk helps parents restore calm in their homes with practical advice for parents of strong-willed children. Find out more about his courses and seminars.









    If you enjoyed this episode of The Wired Homeschool, consider supporting the podcast by buying me a coffee.







    Follow the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.







    Music for the podcast is “RetroFuture Clean” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/







    Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. In some cases, I may have been given a free sample of a product to review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsement.

    Tony Ceraso (Encore)

    Tony Ceraso (Encore)

    In this encore episode, we revisit an interview I did with Tony Ceraso from Homeschool Astronomy. This interview was originally recorded at the 2012 Northeast Great Homeschool Convention.









    If you enjoyed this episode of The Wired Homeschool, consider supporting the podcast by buying me a coffee.







    Follow the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and more.







    Music for the podcast is “RetroFuture Clean” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/







    Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. In some cases, I may have been given a free sample of a product to review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsement.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
35 Ratings

35 Ratings

The New Teacher Podcast ,

Great Ideas for Old Smart Phone

Hi John. I just heard you on Ask Pat and enjoyed listening to uses for old smart phones. I met Pat (and others) this past summer at Podcast Movement and have just launched The New Teacher Podcast.

Fulltime RV mom ,

A True Gem

John Wilkerson’s The Wired Homeschool is a tremendous podcast for navigating the sea of online homeschool resources. His depth of knowledge is astounding. I loved listening in and learning about real tools that make real strides in our homeschool. Thanks for your commitment to this project John!

calenelson ,

The 'cool' Homeschool Podcast

Give John a listen to connect with all things Homeschool and Tech!!!

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