10 episodes

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

The Workamper Show Podcast Greg Gerber

    • Places & Travel
    • 4.8, 10 Ratings

Workampers are adventuresome individuals, couples and families who have chosen a wonderful lifestyle that combines ANY kind of part-time or full-time work with RV camping. If you work as an employee, operate a business, or donate your time as a volunteer, AND you sleep in an RV, you are a Workamper! The Workamper Show is a podcast about workamping and the people who enjoy the lifestyle, either full-time or seasonally. It will feature interviews with current and former Workampers, as well as people who hire them to perform a wide variety of jobs. We'll even feature interviews with experienced RVers. The goal of The Workamper Show is to show people that they don't need to be retired to enjoy the RV lifestyle. We'll offer tips on getting started quickly, and making the most of the journey. Opportunities abound all over North America to work full- or part-time jobs. Some people work sales, management or customer service positions at campgrounds, tourist sites, amusement parks, wineries, farms and other public and private companies. Many Workampers accept new jobs every three to six months, which is plenty of time to immerse themselves in the culture of the area they're visiting. It's an excellent opportunity to experience a part of the country that many tourists only zip through on the way to their next destination. Perhaps they'll spend the summer in New England, enjoy the winter in Arizona, and head to the mountains the next year before venturing to Florida. Buckle up, you're about to launch a memorable adventure you've been dreaming about for years. The good news is that The Workamper Show will help you achieve your goal faster and more affordably than you imagined.

    Jody Duquette discusses creating the ideal Workamper resume on Podcast 076

    Jody Duquette discusses creating the ideal Workamper resume on Podcast 076

    Today, we will continue an interview with the executive director of Workamper News to discuss ways in which Workampers can increase the likelihood of getting their dream jobs.



    Jody Duquette is the executive director of Workamper News. As a Workamper herself, Jody knows that a resume is often the first impression someone makes with a prospective employer.



    Jody suggests that Workampers begin working on creating a resume at least six months before they want to start their first jobs.



    Fortunately, Workamper News offers a number of tools to help people craft their resumes. There are also a number of videos to watch and articles to read to learn how to prepare a resume that really stands out among the crowd of applicants.



    A Workamping resume is different than a traditional resume that people often craft to get a professional job. There is specific information that employers are looking for when reviewing resumes from Workampers, and Jody explains how to ensure that information is included so it draws the attention of an employer.



    Most Workampers take time to create a good resume when they first start out in the RV lifestyle, but they sometimes forget to keep their resumes updated with their most recent work experience. You’ve put in the time to doing a job, you might as well get credit for that experience.



    Including specific keywords to coincide with the types of jobs that employers are looking for is also critically important. While it may sound better to say that you were a domestic engineer for a company catering to itinerant outdoor guests, employers are searching the database for housekeepers.



    Jody Duquette offered some great advice on keeping resumes simple and to the point when listing jobs that are relevant to the position. She was right in noting that not every job someone has had since high school needs to be included unless the experience really pertains to the job they’re applying to get.



    Jody cited an example of a Workamper who literally worked as a NASA rocket scientist, but kept his experience confined to exactly what the employer was looking for, and that ensured he got the job.



    The best advice is to imagine a busy employer having to look through a bunch of resumes to find those people who have the basic qualifications in order to find people to interview. By ensuring that information that is essential to that particular job can be seen quickly as employers are scanning resumes, you greatly increase your chases of being considered.



    Another important point is to ensure that you frequently update your availability date as well as the states in which you want to work. You don’t want to field a bunch of job offers – or give employers false hope – for jobs in states you no longer desire to visit.



    It does not help to indicate that you want to work in 49 states. Employers see that as being someone who lacks focus and is likely to bolt when the first opportunity to work somewhere else opens up.



    One thing that employers also look for in resumes is information about who will be staying with the Workampers, whether it is a spouse, partner, children or even pets. They also look for information about the type of RV that Workampers use.



    It’s all about transparency. If you disclose information up front, there are no surprises later. That goes for employers and Workampers alike. Trying to hide something that will be discovered as soon as people arrive and start working is silly and unprofessional.



    For more information about how to avoid common pitfalls in creating an ideal Workamping resume, visit www.workamper.com. There is a plethora of tools available to help Workampers find great jobs that are ideal fits for their skills, talents, abilities and desires.

    • 43 min
    Jody Duquette describes the variety of jobs available to Workampers on podcast Episode 075

    Jody Duquette describes the variety of jobs available to Workampers on podcast Episode 075

    Today we are going to talk with one of the co-owners of Workamper News about the variety of jobs that are advertised on the platform every year.



    Jody Duquette is the executive director of Workamper News. Among other things, she oversees production of the magazine and online content management.



    In this episode, Jody describes the myriad of short-term jobs that are available to Workampers. They can be part-time or full-time. Some last just a couple of weeks, some an entire season, and some until the Workampers opt to move on to something else.



    While a majority of jobs advertised involve serving as camp hosts or helping out at campgrounds. Jody talks about jobs available at private campgrounds as well as public parks. She explains how national parks work with private concessionaires to run much of the public services provided at the parks. There are a number of hotels and lodges that also hire Workampers.



    Jody touches on a number of other categories, such as amusement parks, water parks, and other tourist-related attractions that would be considered entertainment. For example, people can find work at baseball stadiums and racetracks. Some people are even involved in traveling with musicians to help set up equipment and even perform.



    Retail outlets rely on Workampers to staff restaurants, souvenir stands, truck stops, convenience stores and gift shops. People can sell Christmas trees and are even hired to help set up holiday decorations and displays for businesses, governments and private homes.



    Workampers are hired to sell pumpkins, fireworks and farm produce, too. Whether it is sugar beets, blueberries, and other types of fruits and vegetables, people are hired to help with the harvest.



    Some places hire people to care for animals or help maintain ranches, farms and wineries.



    Not all Workampers are looking for paid positions. Some like to volunteer for a variety of faith-based and social services organizations. Nature preserves seek Workampers to help care for animals and museums seek them to greet visitors, too.



    Jody also talks about some of the small businesses that Workampers operate from their RVs.



    As the daughter of Steve and Kathy Jo Anderson, the owners of Workamper News, Jody practically grew up in the business. As the editor of Workamper News and the person overseeing content creation for the website and magazine, she is intimately familiar with the different types of employers seeking people to fill a variety of short-term jobs.



    Some of the jobs can be very lucrative, like working for the sugar beet harvest or serving as a gate guard controlling access to oil fields.



    Some jobs are in very busy places, like amusement parks and attractions, while others can be isolated in remote parts of the country, like at Army Corps of Engineers properties.



    Some involve working with people while others require Workampers to work with animals or completely on their own.



    Some Workampers operate their own businesses from the road, while others simply work as independent contractors for other companies.



    The bottom line is that there is a lot of opportunity for people to enjoy the RV and travel lifestyle now, and get paid for it.



    All you need is a resume and a list of employers seeking to hire people just like you. Workamper News can help get you started today by visiting www.workamper.com and signing up for a free account. That gives you access to the Workamper Academy and Facebook community so you can learn more about the lifestyle and how it works.



    When you’re serious about finding that first job, then you can become a Diamond or Platinum member to receive access to daily job hotlines,

    • 42 min
    Evada Cooper shares her story of RVing out of necessity to fully embracing the lifestyle in Episode 074

    Evada Cooper shares her story of RVing out of necessity to fully embracing the lifestyle in Episode 074

    Today we will speak with a woman who started RVing out of necessity, then fell in love with an RV expert and, together, they operated several successful businesses from the road.



    Many people may have heard of Evada Cooper, but few probably know her story. She grew up in Texas and started the RV lifestyle out of necessity after she was divorced and needed an inexpensive place to live while raising her teenage daughter, two dogs and a cat.



    Evada explains why a fifth wheel was the ideal choice for her living situation. After they moved to Waco, Texas, to be closer to her oldest daughter, the girls created a Match.com profile for their mother. Four or five months later, Evada attracted the attention of a fellow who taught RV maintenance courses for a nearby state technical school.



    That man was Terry Cooper, the infamous Texas RV professor. Once they got married, the couple moved into a small apartment. But, when the economy took a dive in 2009, and the college cancelled the RV tech training program, Cooper and Evada started the Mobile RV Academy and hit the road training technicians in various cities around the country.



    While on the road, Evada started her own RV cooking show and published the RV Centennial Cookbook featuring easy-to-prepare recipes that RVers can make in their own kitchens.



    As demand for trained technicians outgrew their ability to provide classes in rented facilities, they bought an RV park in Texas and broke ground for what is now the Big Red School House in Athens.



    Evada shares her experiences on the road, which fanned the flames of her passion for the RV lifestyle and to help people start mobile businesses of their own so they could enjoy the same travel experiences.



    She offers some advice on ways for people to scale down to enjoy the RV lifestyle now, while they are really young enough to enjoy it.



    Evada’s story may have unfolded in an unusual way, but it was clearly divine inspiration that led her to make some life-changing decisions that would eventually help thousands of other people to follow her path.



    Her journey started out of necessity to find an affordable place to live while raising a teenage daughter. Then Evada met Terry Cooper, the RV professor, and they traveled the country together to train mobile technicians. While on the road, they met the current owners of Workamper News, Steve and Kathy Anderson.



    The four of them came up with the idea to launch the RV Inspectors Association to train people to operate independent mobile businesses of their own by helping others evaluate RVs before making purchases.



    Training technicians and inspectors proved to be a challenge to do one week here and another week there. That’s when a door opened for them to buy a campground in Texas large enough to develop an adjacent training center.



    Today, thanks to Evada and her husband, Cooper, along with the Andersons, more people than ever are able to enjoy the same RV travel lifestyle, visit the same places and enjoy the same delicious regional foods the Coopers discovered.



    Rather than spending money on a big house with a lot of stuff, they intentionally downsized to enjoy a simpler life with less stress and greater joy.



    Evada Cooper faced several challenges in life, but rather than sulk about her situation, she stepped into the unknown guided by her faith and just followed doors as they opened in front of her.



    Even unfortunate experiences that she faced later proved to be springboards for helping people avoid those same situations and save money in the process.



    If you’d like to meet Evada Cooper in person, you can do so by spending time at the Texan RV Park. You’ll find more information at www.

    • 42 min
    In Episode 073, the Texas RV professor describes a new hybrid training model at the National RV Training Academy

    In Episode 073, the Texas RV professor describes a new hybrid training model at the National RV Training Academy

    Today we are going to talk with the president of the National RV Training Academy about a new hybrid teaching method that will greatly benefit full-time RVers.



    Terry Cooper, who likes to be called “Cooper,” founded the National RV Training Academy in Athens, Texas, in 2018 as a permanent place to train RV technicians and inspectors. Prior to that, Cooper and his wife, Evada, traveled throughout the country in their RV full-time conducting training courses in key locations.



    Eventually, demand for training grew so large that they could no longer accommodate all the students in the rented facilities they had been using. So, they bought a beautiful campground and drew up plans to erect The Big Red School House next door.



    Since opening the training center, Cooper has continued to offer multiple classes every month to churn out RV inspectors and technicians. He also started producing some top-quality video training.



    Things were going well for him. Classes were full and more people than ever were inquiring about how to learn fix their own RVs or open a mobile repair business or even start inspecting RVs for other people.



    Then COVID-19 arrived, and the State of Texas ordered all schools closed and the county imposed restrictions on how many people could be in the same room together. That required Cooper and his staff to scramble in order to come up with a viable alternative.



    They came up with an idea for hybrid training which combines live two-way online classes with prerecorded videos and the workbooks used for their popular home-study course. It proved to be tremendously successful and attracted even more students than they had anticipated.



    So, Cooper expanded the hybrid model to include all the advanced training classes as well. That’s what he is going to talk to us about today.



    He’ll explain how the online hybrid classes work and describe a new way of getting tested in which people can complete all the hands-on exercises along with the testing for certification, if desired, in one Turbo Week of training.



    However, the academy also has a very popular RV Basic Maintenance Course designed with RVers in mind to show them how to fix 80 percent of the problems they are likely to encounter with their own RVs.



    That can save full-time RVers a lot of aggravation in trying to get an appointment for RV service while on the road. Learning to fix most problems by themselves is also a big time and money saver.



    For those people looking to support their RV travel lifestyle, the academy can also help them start a mobile RV repair or RV inspection business.



    This new hybrid training method will be a game changer in the ways RV owners or professional technicians and inspectors learn to diagnose and fix recreation vehicles.



    Using foundational workbooks and watching short videos at home, then interacting live with an instructor over the internet, people can learn to fix RVs from anywhere.



    If all they want is the knowledge, they have it at their fingertips for easy reference. However, if they see income opportunities by fixing RVs, then they can make one trip to Texas for a refresher course, hands-on workshops and certification testing to get their professional credentials. They can also participate in live training at the academy.



    If they want to become inspectors, they can do all the training online or at live classes in Texas.



    It is a truly innovative way to deliver quality training to a lot of people. To find out more about courses offered by the National RV Training Academy, visit www.nrvta.com.



    I’d like to thank Cooper for being a guest on today’s show, but also to thank him for his weekly support of this podcast since its inception.

    • 41 min
    In Episode 072, Kathy Chefas describes an opportunity to sell Christmas trees in south Florida

    In Episode 072, Kathy Chefas describes an opportunity to sell Christmas trees in south Florida

    Today we are going to talk with a woman who owns a Christmas tree farm in North Carolina, but hires Workampers to sell trees from lots in south Florida.



    Kathy Chefas and her husband, John, own Hart-T-Tree Farms, a company that is tucked away in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Grassy Creek, N.C., and a stone’s throw from the Virginia state line. The farm specializes in growing Fraser firs, which make spectacular Christmas trees.



    John grew up selling trees in Chicago and shortly after meeting Kathy, he bought property near Hart, Mich., to begin growing his own trees. That’s how Hart-T-Tree farm got its name.



    Later, they discovered an opportunity to sell their trees to people in Florida, and set up a network of tree lots in Broward and Palm Beach counties, along Florida’s eastern coast. It proved to be the right move.



    Eventually the couple acquired land and moved the farming operation to North Carolina. Still, they hire several Workampers each year to sell trees from just before Thanksgiving through Christmas Eve.



    The company operates more than a dozen Florida tree lots in cooperation with local businesses, charities and churches.



    Workampers live in their RVs right at the tree lot where electricity is brought in along with water. A honey wagon service pumps the tanks for the RVers once a week.



    Hart-T-Trees provides training the week before Thanksgiving when all the other Workampers get to meet each other and form relationships that can be beneficial during the selling season.



    The Workampers are guaranteed a minimum base income, but they earn additional money based on the number of trees they sell. They are required to water the trees each night, but they also have the ability to hire their own part-time workers to assist on busy days.



    Selling Christmas trees is certainly a unique opportunity for Workampers and a great way to earn some money just before the holidays.



    Spending the Christmas season in south Florida would be a dream for many people. Thanks to Hart-T-Tree farms, it’s possible to make money at the same time.



    The company offer a great opportunity for entrepreneurial couples who can provide excellent customer service, and use a little savvy to sell Christmas trees to Floridians, especially the snowbirds who arrive from northern states each fall.



    It’s almost like having a turn-key, short-term business, where you partner with Hart-T-Tree farms to sell their harvest of trees. The Workampers learn to care for the trees and set prices.



    After completing four days of training in Florida, the Workampers pretty much have independence to work their plans and run the lots knowing that help is available from the owners and other nearby Workampers upon occasion.



    I really appreciate Kathy’s honesty in explaining what people can expect, what she expects, what is involved in the process, and how she oversees Workampers.



    Like she said, it’s not a job for everyone. The hours can be long and some days are really hectic, especially as it gets closer to Christmas. But, if you have some business experience or sales skills, it’s a great opportunity to pick up a little Christmas cash.



    For more information about this opportunity, send Kathy an email to kchefas@hotmail.com. She’ll review your resume and respond with an introductory video to give you an even better understanding of the work entailed.



    Also, keep an eye out for their Workamper Hotline notices because the family occasionally hires Workampers to help out at the farm in North Carolina.



    Workamper News, a magazine and online publication, connects RVers to full- and part-time jobs around the country.

    • 40 min
    In Podcast 071, Lu Syrett describes current opportunities at Utah’s historic Ruby’s Inn

    In Podcast 071, Lu Syrett describes current opportunities at Utah’s historic Ruby’s Inn

    Today we are going to hear from an employer whose business has been hiring Workampers for decades and is still looking for people to work this summer.



    Luciene Syrett, or Lu as she likes to be called, is the gift shop manager at Ruby’s Inn, which is located just outside of Bryce Canyon National Park.



    The family-owned business was started in 1916 by her great-grandfather, Reuben Syrett, who liked to be called Ruby. Today, the sixth generation of Syretts are working there.



    It may have started as a simple inn to greet travelers who wanted to see the spectacular canyon. However, Ruby’s Inn has grown into a destination itself. It now involves 800 hotel rooms spread over three properties as well as a 150-site, full hook-up RV park.



    The compound is located in a rural part of southern Utah, but right in the middle of what is called Monument Valley. It is only a few hours from the Grand Canyon, Zion National Park, Capitol Reef National Park, Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument and Canyonlands National Park.



    Ruby’s Inn hires 700 people each season, many of whom are Workampers. They hire so many that the family built a separate 70-site RV park just to create a community for Workampers.



    Lu describes some of the duties Workampers can perform. They include helping in the hotels or RV park, staffing one of three restaurants, assisting guests at the nightly country music show, inspecting hotel rooms, scooping ice cream or selling candies at a specialty shop, fixing cars at the auto center, or keeping shelves stocked at the general store.



    The season typically begins in late March and continues through the end of October. All the jobs are paid and come with generous bonuses for working after Labor Day.



    Ruby’s Inn sounds like a really fun place to work in the truly spectacular Monument Valley of Utah.



    The Syrett family is especially appreciative of their Workampers because they play vital roles in serving the tens of thousands of people who visit their family-owned business each year.



    Because Ruby’s Inn is located in a rural area, the family relies upon Workampers to supplement the local labor who must often come from long distances just to get to work.



    The family works hard to make sure that Workampers feel welcome and valued. They orchestrate regular potluck dinners to help people get to know each other and the rest of the family.



    I appreciate Lu Syrett for taking time to talk to me about the many opportunities still available for Workampers this year.



    I liked Lu’s explanation of how the family ensures Workampers are comfortable with their jobs by assigning an experienced buddy to help each person learn the ropes. It also helps them forge friendships quickly with other staff members.



    State laws may prevent the company from giving away a free campsite, but renting a full hook-up RV site for $150 per month anywhere in Monument Valley is a spectacular deal.



    To entice people to stay through the fall shoulder season, Ruby’s Inn offers a generous bonus to work after Labor Day when schools are back in session, and the firm loses many of its teenage and college-age workers.



    Workampers are still needed to work this summer and fall. To find out more information about the company and types of jobs Workampers can perform, visit www.rubysinn.com/employment.



    Workamper News, a magazine and online publication, connects RVers to full- and part-time jobs around the country. Whether it is running a business from your RV or working short-term jobs for a variety of employers, Workamper News can give you information to help plan a course to live your own dream and get you on the road faster than you thought possible...

    • 32 min

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