225 episodes

A military history podcast that looks at all aspects of WWII.

With WW2 slipping from living memory I aim to look at different historical aspects of the Second World War.

The WW2 Podcast Angus Wallace

    • History
    • 4.7 • 1K Ratings

A military history podcast that looks at all aspects of WWII.

With WW2 slipping from living memory I aim to look at different historical aspects of the Second World War.

    The D-Day Scientists Who Changed Special Operations

    The D-Day Scientists Who Changed Special Operations

    Operation Jubilee, the Dieppe Raid on the coast of France, was a disaster in 1942. However, it did highlight the need for more reconnaissance before any other amphibious operations were mounted.
    In London, a small group of eccentric researchers, experimenting on themselves from inside pressure tanks in the middle of the London air raids, explored the deadly science needed to enable the critical reconnaissance vessels and underwater breathing apparatuses that would enable the Allies’ future amphibious landings, specifically D-Day.
    Joining me today is Dr Rachel Lance.
    Rachel is an Assistant Consulting Professor at Duke University, where she conducts research out of their Hyperbaric Medicine facility. She is also the author of Chamber Divers: The Untold Story of the D-Day Scientists Who Changed Special Operations Forever.
    Patreon:
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 47 min
    Training the Indian Army

    Training the Indian Army

    The Indian Army was the largest volunteer army during the Second World War. Indian Army divisions fought in the Middle East, North Africa and Italy - and went to make up the overwhelming majority of the troops in South East Asia. Over two million personnel served in the Indian Army.
    In this episode, I am joined by Dr Alan Jefferys to discuss how the Indian Army developed a more comprehensive training structure than any other Commonwealth country during WWII. This was achieved through both the dissemination of doctrine and the professionalism of a small cadre of Indian Army officers who brought about a military culture within the Indian Army - starting in the 1930s - that came to fruition during the Second World War.
    Alan is the Head of Equipment and Uniform at the National Army Museum and the author of Approach to Battle: Training the Indian Army During the Second World War.
    Patreon
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 40 min
    The Archer: Reversing to Victory

    The Archer: Reversing to Victory

    From late 1944, an ungainly piece of equipment was introduced into service in the British and Canadian armies. Referred to at the time as the ‘Valentine 17-pounder SP’, and later as the ‘Archer’, it was a tracked vehicle with an open compartment at the front and a large gun facing to the rear.
    Joining me to tell the story of the Archer's development is loyal patron of the show, and author of ‘Self Propelled 17 Pounder - Archer’, Christopher Camfield.
    Patreon
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 43 min
    D-Day Tourism

    D-Day Tourism

    While at We Have Ways Fest, I caught Paul Woodadge, the host of WW2TV, giving an excellent talk on D-Day tourism. I thought I would ask him on the show to discuss tourism, how it has changed and what to see.
    Base in France, Paul has been a battlefield tour guide for over 20 years. More recently, he launched WW2TV and became a Second World War YouTube sensation.
    You can find Paul at DDayHistorian.com and ww2tv.com.
    Patreon
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Target Hong Kong

    Target Hong Kong

    In January 1945, Admiral Halsey, with the third Fleet, conducted a raid into the South China Sea. This was designated Operation Gratitude. The raid was to support the landings on Luzon, in the Philippines, with the aim of destroying the Japanese navy, supply convoys and any air assets in the area.
    As part of this operation, Hong Kong would be attacked.
    Steven Bailey joins me.
    Steven is the author of Target Hong Kong, which looks at the raid from numerous angles, including an eyewitness account from a British prison officer held in a Japanese internment camp on the island.
     
    Patreon
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 44 min
    How the Luftwaffe Lost the skies over Germany

    How the Luftwaffe Lost the skies over Germany

    Starting with small raids at the start of the war, the aerial offensive grew into a massive operation. Huge air armadas would eventually pulverise Germany, with the Mighty Eigth Airforce flying by day and the Lancasters of Bomber Command by night. This 24-hour campaign seriously damaged Germany’s ability to make war and killed hundreds of thousands.
    Joining me is Jonathan Trigg, whose new book is The Air War Through German Eyes: How the Luftwaffe Lost the Skies over the Reich, which looks at the air war from the point of view of the Germans.
     
    Patreon
    patreon.com/ww2podcast

     

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
1K Ratings

1K Ratings

#godscreation ,

MUST LISTEN!!

im a teenager who loves history and this show chcks all boxes!!!! extremly in depth and always answers all of my questions! definitely
my favorate world war 2 podcast

Vey1333 ,

Enjoy

Very in-depth

Dradjaz ,

Consistent quality

Consistently informative and entertaining.

Stands above most other WWII streams. Host is appealing and relaxed with his guests.

The best, fully produced shows with dramatic scenes and sound design rise to podcast greatness.

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