363 episodes

"Then and Now" connects events from the past with today's news headlines. Current episodes are history topics from my global culture and history course.

In 2006, the podcast started with students in my introductory global history and culture course at the Univ of Minn. Previous episodes reviewed history topics, special music episodes connecting a country's culture with its music, interviews with voices of students and community members as they were part of historical events, and other topics. Episodes featured independent music artists. Share comments about the podcast with David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu

Then and Now: Global History and Culture Arendale Education Media

    • History
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

"Then and Now" connects events from the past with today's news headlines. Current episodes are history topics from my global culture and history course.

In 2006, the podcast started with students in my introductory global history and culture course at the Univ of Minn. Previous episodes reviewed history topics, special music episodes connecting a country's culture with its music, interviews with voices of students and community members as they were part of historical events, and other topics. Episodes featured independent music artists. Share comments about the podcast with David Arendale, arendale@umn.edu

    (Bonus) First Bombardment of Midway Island

    (Bonus) First Bombardment of Midway Island

    (Bonus) The First Bombardment of Midway, or the First Bombardment of Sand Island, or Attack on Midway, was a small land and sea engagement of World War II. It occurred on the very first day of the Pacific War, 7 December 1941, not long after the major attack on Pearl Harbor. Two Imperial Japanese destroyers bombarded Sand Island of Midway Atoll. The Japanese successfully damaged the U.S. Marine base before being engaged by American shore batteries and forced to flee.

    (Bonus) Imperial Japanese Navy

    (Bonus) Imperial Japanese Navy

    (Bonus) The Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II, at the beginning of the Pacific War in December 1941, was the third most powerful navy in the world, and the naval air service was one of the most potent air forces in the world. During the first six months of the war, the Imperial Japanese Navy enjoyed spectacular success in inflicting heavy defeats on Allied forces, being undefeated in every battle. The attack on
    Pearl Harbor crippled the battleships of the
    US Pacific Fleet, while Allied navies were devastated during Japan's conquest of Southeast Asia. Japanese Navy aircraft operating from land bases were also responsible for the sinkings of HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse which was the first time that capital ships were sunk by an aerial attack while underway. In April 1942, the Indian Ocean raid drove the Royal Navy from South East Asia. After these successes, the Japanese now concentrated on the elimination and neutralization of strategic points from where the Allies could launch counteroffensives against Japan's conquests. However, at the Coral Sea, the Japanese were forced to abandon their attempts to isolate Australia while the defeat at Midway saw them forced on the defensive. The campaign in the Solomon Islands, in which the Japanese lost the war of attrition, was the most decisive; they had failed to commit enough forces in sufficient time.

    (Bonus) Pacific Theater aircraft carrier operations during World War II

    (Bonus) Pacific Theater aircraft carrier operations during World War II

    (Bonus) Naval historians such as Evan Mawdsley, Richard Overy, and Craig Symonds concluded that World War II's decisive victories on land could not have been won without decisive victories at sea.[1][2][3] Naval battles to keep shipping lanes open for combatant's movement of troops, guns, ammunition, tanks, warships, aircraft, raw materials, and food largely determined the outcome of land battles. Without the Allied victory in keeping shipping lanes open during the Battle of the Atlantic, Britain could not have fed her people or withstood Axis offensives in Europe and North Africa. Without Britain's survival and without Allied shipments of food and industrial equipment to the Soviet Union,[a] her military and economic power would likely not have rebounded in time for Russian soldiers to prevail at Stalingrad and Kursk.

    WWII: Key Turning Points, 2 of 8

    WWII: Key Turning Points, 2 of 8

    S15-E14 Topics: Key turning points of World War Two; Battle of Midway; Role of Aircraft Carriers.
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    • 28 min
    (Bonus) Areas annexed by Germany

    (Bonus) Areas annexed by Germany

    (Bonus) There were many areas annexed by Germany both immediately before and throughout the course of World War II. Territories that were part of Germany before the annexations were known as the "Altreich" (Old Reich).

    (Bonus) Causes of WWII

    (Bonus) Causes of WWII

    (Bonus) The causes of World War II, a global war from 1939 to 1945 that was the deadliest conflict in human history, have been given considerable attention by historians from many countries who studied and understood them. The immediate precipitating event was the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany on September 1, 1939, and the subsequent declarations of war on Germany made by Britain and France, but many other prior events have been suggested as ultimate causes. Primary themes in the historical analysis of the war's origins include the political takeover of Germany in 1933 by Adolf Hitler and the Nazi Party; Japanese militarism against China, which led to the Second Sino-Japanese War; Italian aggression against Ethiopia, which led to the Second Italo Ethiopian War and Germany's initial success in negotiating the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact with the Soviet Union to divide the territorial control of Eastern Europe between them.

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