228 episodes

Every week on This Had Oscar Buzz, film and entertainment writers Joe Reid and Chris Feil are going to be talking about a different movie that once upon a time had big-time Academy Award aspirations, and for one reason or another, it all went wrong.

This Had Oscar Buzz Joe and Chris

    • TV & Film
    • 4.8 • 913 Ratings

Every week on This Had Oscar Buzz, film and entertainment writers Joe Reid and Chris Feil are going to be talking about a different movie that once upon a time had big-time Academy Award aspirations, and for one reason or another, it all went wrong.

    207 – Life Itself (with Billy Ray Brewton)

    207 – Life Itself (with Billy Ray Brewton)

    We don’t know if we’re equipped to episode this much, but here we are. A bomb so fiery, we brought host of The Incinerator podcast host Billy Ray Brewton to help us unpack it all: 2018′s Life Itself. From This Is Us’ Dan Fogelman, the film assembles a large ensemble including Oscar Isaac, Olivia Wilde, Olivia Cooke, and Antonio Banderas to tell a tale of big emotions, intergenerational heartache, and unreliable narrators. The film arrived as a TIFF gala with big weepy expectations, and like a rogue MTA bus right out of the film, critics brought on a brutal and well-earned drubbing.





    After partnering with other distributors for previous releases, this film was Amazon’s widest solo release and quickly became as big of a bomb for audiences as it was for critics. This episode, we unpack what makes it such a mess and how Amazon succeeded that year with Cold War instead. We also talk about the umpteen versions of “Make You Feel My Love,” This is Us’ Emmy flub this season, and Amazon’s purchase of United Artists.





    Topics also include Annette Bening “I don’t know her”-ing Natalie Portman, Deuxmoi culture, and the Grammys of Soy Bomb and “Sonny Came Home”.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil


    Billy Ray: @billyraybrewton

    • 2 hr 8 min
    206 – Infamous

    206 – Infamous

    Before Bennett Miller’s Capote even arrived and made a steamroll Best Actor winner out of Philip Seymour Hoffman, there was an entire other Truman Capote biopic in the can. Charting the same portion of the legendary and controversial writer’s life as he wrote In Cold Blood, 2006′s Infamous cast Toby Jones as Capote along with a cast of more recognizable faces than the previous year’s version, including Sandra Bullock as Capote’s friend and confidante Harper Lee and new James Bond Daniel Craig. Despite Capote having played some of the very same film festivals, Infamous was welcomed into the fall festival season anyway. But this film’s emphasis on the high society gossip that was integral to the author’s persona wasn’t enough to distinguish this film from what came before, quickly dissolving from the season.

    This episode, we unpack the unavoidable comparison’s between this biopic depiction and Miller’s film. We also have our first double Six Timers Club between Infamous supporting players Sigourney Weaver and Gwyneth Paltrow, and discuss Paltrow’s role as Not Peggy Lee, and Warner Independent’s other awards hopeful in 2006: For Your Consideration.

    Topics also include Raja’s Diana Vreeland Snatch Game performance, “James Blonde”, and Parker Posey in The Staircase.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil

    • 1 hr 30 min
    205 – The Four Feathers

    205 – The Four Feathers

    Long-time listeners of the podcast will recognize this week’s episode as one promised from the very beginning! In 2002, The Four Feathers arrived with major Oscar follow-up and star-on-the-rise pedigree. The film was Shekhar Kapur’s directorial follow-up to the Oscar anointed (and Cate Blanchett launching) Elizabeth, and starred three of the biggest young would-be megastars in its love triangle: Heath Ledger, Wes Bentley, and Kate Hudson. But on top of being one of many cinematic versions of A.E.W. Mason’s, the film bored critics and audiences when it world premiered as a TIFF gala, and fizzled entirely upon release a few weeks later.

    This week, we talk about its three headliners at critical points of their careers: Ledger being foisted onto traditional leading man roles, Hudson following her Almost Famous Oscar nomination, and Bentley trying to escape that floating plastic bag. We also talk about Kapur’s dual Elizabeth films, the film’s supporting male cast of recognizable faces, and the film’s apolitical stance post-9/11.

    Topics also include sideburns, the film’s brownface makeup, and Ledger’s final stretch of roles.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil

    • 1 hr 26 min
    204 – A Prairie Home Companion (with Clay Keller)

    204 – A Prairie Home Companion (with Clay Keller)

    An episode long teased has finally arrived. Screen Drafts co-host (and proud Minnesotan) Clay Keller joins us to discuss the final film from beloved auteur Robert Altman, 2006′s A Prairie Home Companion. Based on and set within the eponymous radio show, the film follows the backstage goings-on during the show’s fictionalized final live recording, with a sprawling cast of Altman regulars and newbies including Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin, Kevin Kline, Maya Rudolph, Woody Harrelson, John C. Reilly, Lindsay Lohan, and Virginia Madsen as an angel of death. Altman would pass the November after its release, but sadly did not receive posthumous recognition for the film due to its somewhat divided reception.

    This episode, we’re discussing the dual summer roles for Streep between this and The Devil Wears Prada, and we’re celebrating our tenth Streep episode! We also discuss Lohan’s turmoil at the time, Paul Thomas Anderson as a contractually obligated backup director, and Clay brings us stories from his experience as an extra on the set of the film.

    Topics also include the Streep/Tomlin tribute to Altman at the previous ceremony, bad jokes, and a Screen Drafts-style ranking of the film’s best performances.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil


    Clay: @claykeller

    • 2 hr 37 min
    203 – Martha Marcy May Marlene

    203 – Martha Marcy May Marlene

    One of the major stories out of 2011′s Sundance Film Festival was the arrival of Elizabeth Olsen, a new actress who just happened to be the younger sibling of the Olsen twins. In Sean Durkin’s debut Martha Marcy May Marlene, Olsen stars as a young woman who escapes a cult and copes with her fractured identity in the wary arms of her estranged older sister, played by Sarah Paulson. The film earned rave reviews, a Directing prize for Durkin, and distribution with Fox Searchlight. The film would be sold in the shadow of the previous year’s Oscar success Winter’s Bone: a Sundance launch, a star-making debut performance, and a chilling supporting performance from John Hawkes. But the film was significantly less audience friendly thriller by comparison, and paired with Searchlight’s stacked lineup of films, Martha didn’t fit the Oscar mold.

    However, Martha Marcy May Marlene remains a movie we are still haunted by. This episode, we talk about the film and its associated network of stars and directors that would become Sundance staples. We also discuss the stiff competition faced by Olsen in the Best Actress race, Paulson’s career prior to becoming a Ryan Murphy staple, and Hawkes’ run of awards-buzzed roles in the early 2010s.

    Topics also include our love of Durkin’s The Nest, thoughts on The Staircase, and ugly QR code posters.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil

    • 2 hr 6 min
    202 – Us

    202 – Us

    Few filmmaking ascents have been as exciting and heralded as Jordan Peele’s with the arrival of Get Out in 2017. After creating lasting cultural importance and winning the Best Original Screenplay Oscar, Peele’s follow-up was one of the most eagerly awaited films before it was even announced. And in early 2019, the follow-up would be Us, a sci-fi/horror film with American societal divides on its mind and a daring performance by Oscar winner Lupita Nyong’o at its center. The film was an equal box office success to Peele’s debut, though it received a less unanimous response in terms of how well he pulls off its metaphors. What kept the film in awards discussion was Nyong’o performance, including SAG and Critics’ Choice nominations, but missing out on the Oscar lineup.

    This episode, we discuss our feverish anticipation of Jordan Peele’s upcoming Nope and unpack the layers of Us’ allegory. We also look at the brilliant and less recognized performances from Winston Duke and Elisabeth Moss, the 2017 Oscars where Get Out faced stiff competition, and the 2019 Best Actress race.

    Topics also include supposed genre bias against other actresses, critics groups as awards influencers, and our 2019 Best Actress ballots.

    Follow Us on Twitter!


    @Had_Oscar_Buzz


    Joe: @joereid


    Chris: @chrisvfeil

    • 1 hr 54 min

Customer Reviews

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913 Ratings

913 Ratings

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My favorite podcast! I look forward to every episode, even when I’ve never seen the film. They make it interesting for everyone & keep me laughing!

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