22 episodes

Each episode we look at important issues around food, and we talk to academics, activists, policymakers, nutritionists, chefs, or any expert who work on these issues.

Thought About Food Podcast Ian Werkheiser

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

Each episode we look at important issues around food, and we talk to academics, activists, policymakers, nutritionists, chefs, or any expert who work on these issues.

    Galina Kallio on Regenerative Agriculture

    Galina Kallio on Regenerative Agriculture

    We spoke with Galina Kallio about regenerative agriculture, relationships of humans to the soil, and alternative forms of organizing self-reliant food economies


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Rate our podcast and leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show.

    Galina Kallio is a co-founder of the Untame Research Lab which we talked about in the interview. Check it out! It hasn't yet been fully translated to English, but the google translation works well, and an English version is coming in the future.

    Galina was also kind enough to share a recipe with us! It's for a vegan cabbage dish called solyanka. As Galina says, "My grand-aunt used to make me this when I was a little girl, and I still remember the taste of this dish made with fresh cabbage from our allotment garden. The original recipe included sausages, but I have modified this to my current dietary habits.

    Cabbage (preferably white but you can vary with other colours & varieties)





    Carrots





    Garlic





    Onions





    Chili (if you like, not necessary) 




    Salt & Pepper Cut
    Cut everything in thin slices, and carrots you can grate. Use your favourite oil (olive, rapeseed)  and fry (lightly) chili & garlic in the pan, add onions. When onions have softened and gained a bit of colour add cabbage and stir & fry, after the cabbage has softened a bit add carrots. If the ingredients are dry you can add some water or broth (e.g. nettle broth!). Add salt and pepper. Stir until ingredients almost resemble 'stew' – they must be soft but not too soft! If you want to make this a bit more filling, you can use e.g. beans, tofu, or mushrooms. This can be used as a meal on its own or as a side dish."







    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and an interesting way to have a relationship with agriculture and the non-human world! It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Clement Loo on Just Sustainability and Engaged Scholarship

    Clement Loo on Just Sustainability and Engaged Scholarship

    We spoke with Clement Loo about food justice and food security, including food insecurity among college students, and how academics can be engaged with communities. We also talked about his podcast, Just Sustainability.


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Rate our podcast and leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show.

    Clement Loo hosts one of my favorite podcasts, Just Sustainability. You can listen to it wherever you get your podcasts, or on its own website. I suggest listening to the other half of our conversation there when he interviewed me!

    Clement was kind enough to share a recipe that he grew up eating, updated with modern cooking technology:
    "Below is how I cook jook (which is the Cantonese name for Congee) in my Instant Pot. 
     
    This is a recipe for a dish that's a cultural food for my family, something that I really hated when I was a kid, but has now become a comfort food (particularly when I don't feel well). 
     
    When I think about jook I think about my identity as a Chinese-Canadian/American from a family that has inconsistently hung onto Cantonese (or, to be more specific, Taishanese) culture. Our ancestors first immigrated to Canada and China in the latter-half of the1800s and over that time my family has developed a hodge-podge of traditions that mixes Chinese, Anglo-Canadian, and Euro-American. This recipe, while in some ways is super traditional, is executed in a way that would be probably unrecognizable (and would be probably considered incorrect) to someone from Guangzhou. 
     
    Ingredients (serves anywhere between 2 to 4 people):
    1 cup of long-grained white rice (though medium grain rice works as well)
    6 to 8 cups of water (depending if you like a thicker or runnier gruel)
    1 Chinese sausage (i.e. lap cheong) finely diced (optional and fine to exclude if you're a vegetarian or vegan)
    1 chicken or 1/2 turkey carcass (or, if one is without a carcass or don't eat carcasses, you can replace the water with an equal amount of vegetable stock or chicken stock)
    pickled vegetables to taste, finely diced (I tend to use kimchi because it's the easiest to find but my dad uses some sort of Chinese pickles -- I think pickled radishes)
    1 century egg, finely diced (also can be excluded if one is vegan or just is thrown off by fermented eggs that are dyed black -- they have a strong sort of acetone/ammonia sort of undernote so consider yourself warned if you haven't tried them before. That said, they are terrific if you know what to expect -- they have a really complex and unique flavor)
    ginger to taste, peeled and finely chopped
    salt to taste (I tend to salt just before serving because it's hard to tell prior how much seasoning the jook will require)
    1/8 teaspoon of five spice
     
    Instructions:
    I put everything into the Instant Pot and set it to pressure cook for 30 minutes followed by a slow pressure release (i.e. I don't release the pressure but wait for it to reduce pressure on its own). Then I scoop it into a big bowl and eat it. My dad doesn't do it that way. He wouldn't add the pickles or century egg into the pot and, instead, add them as a garnish just prior to serving. Doing it my way is easier, doing it my dad's way would provide you with more textural variety (which some people might appreciate). If you use a carcass, be careful to look out for small bones when you're eating."


    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a great accompaniment to listening to Clement's podcast in the morning! It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 57 min
    Jennifer Molidor on Just Food Systems and Sustainable Agriculture

    Jennifer Molidor on Just Food Systems and Sustainable Agriculture

    This episode we spoke with Jennifer Molidor about food justice and sustainable agriculture, and how that can be pursued in public policy, activism, and changing individual diets. We also talk about pursuing alternatives to academic careers. It's a lot of fun, and really interesting.


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Rate our podcast and leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show.

    Jennifer Molidor is a senior food campaigner at the Center for Biological Diversity. That organization also has a website devoted to food issues called Take Extinction Off Your Plate, and you can follow her on Twitter @JenniferMolidor

    Jennifer was kind enough to share a recipe with us. It's a family-favorite vegan sandwich, and I can report it's great! Here's what she had to say:
    "I had a hard time choosing something, from power bowls to smoothies to my renowned guacamole, but I’ll go with a simple sammich because mom-life means a lot of sandwiches that are packed with protein and deliciousness. It’s a smushed chickpea sandwich and measurements are all to taste:


    Toasted bread

    Plant-based mayo

    Lightly toasted mustard seeds

    Dijon mustard

    Small chopped red onion

    Small chopped leek

    1 tsp Himalayan salt

    1 pinch black pepper

    1-2 cans of chickpeas, drained

    1 cup chopped celery

    1 cup chopped pickles

    4 cloves minced fresh garlic

    2 tsp apple cider vinegar

    2 tsp lemon juice

    Pinch of cayenne


     


    Use flavors to taste, but be generous with salt and mayo. Mash chickpeas, mustard and mustard seeds, add in onions, garlic, leek, pickles, celery, and other spices (mash with fork or masher). Add in mayo, lemon juice, vinegar. Taste, adjust as necessary. If you want, you can add nori sheets or yeast to make it more savory/tuna-like. Add parsley or cilantro if you’re into that kind-a thing. This is great alone or in sandwiches and lasts a few days refrigerated. I add avocado slices and tomatoes on my sandwiches with this to keep it juicy."




    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a great starter before a chickpea sandwich in the morning. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 55 min
    Shanti Chu on Identity and Food

    Shanti Chu on Identity and Food

    This episode we spoke with Shanti Chu about the ways our identity and what we eat interact. We also talk about the different ways philosophers can talk about philosophical issues inside and outside academia.


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show.

    Shanti Chu is a philosopher living and working in Chicago. To see some of the cool things she's working on, you can visit her personal page, her vegetarian/vegan blog ChiVeg, her YouTube page, and her Instagram.

    Shanti was kind enough to share a recipe with us that's meaningful to her -- Hearty Tofu Paprikash. As she says,
    "Being half Hungarian, I grew up eating delicious and flavorful Hungarian food.  My Hungarian upbringing has influenced me to the extent of using Paprika in most of my dishes because I can’t live without the flavor.


    While some Hungarian classics are meat-heavy, they can easily be veganized.  For example, chicken paprikash is a staple of the Hungarian diet and it is a very remarkable, comforting dish but it has a lot of meat and dairy in it.  Just because you are vegetarian or vegan doesn’t mean you have to stop eating your Hungarian favorites.  Why not make this Hungarian staple vegetarian friendly with all the scrumptious tomato/paprika flavor?"




    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a great way for me to express my identity. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 51 min
    Tony Chackal on Supper Clubs

    Tony Chackal on Supper Clubs

    This episode we spoke with Tony Chackal about "supper clubs" -- how you can start one, and the political, social, and cultural implications of the practice of providing food as a host or receiving food as a guest.


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review wherever you get your podcasts! It helps people find the show.

    Tony Chackal is a philosopher and Visiting Assistant Professor in the Philosophy Department at Miami University.

    Tony kindly agreed to create a playlist to listen to with your supper club. Take a listen, and if you start a supper club, let us know!

    The book I couldn't come up with the name of was obviously Bowling Alone

    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and a possible inspiration for a "pre-breakfast club" that you could also consider starting. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Ilana Braverman on the Better Food Foundation

    Ilana Braverman on the Better Food Foundation

    This episode we spoke with Ilana Braverman about the Better Food Foundation and how to affect people's choices around food.


    Show Notes:


    Follow us on Twitter at @FoodThoughtPod, and you can drop us a line at ThoughtAboutFood on Gmail. Leave us a review! It helps people find the show.

    Ilana Braverman is Director of Outreach for the Better Food Foundation, and leads the DefaultVeg campaign. You can listen to Ilana's Tedx talk here, Moving Beyond a Hamburger Default World.

    You can visit the Better Food Foundation's website to get involved, or the direct site for their project DefaultVeg.

    The intro and outro music is "Whiskey Before Breakfast" which is both a great traditional song and an interesting morning default. It was performed and shared by The Dan River Ramblers under a Creative Commons license.

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Shanti Chu ,

Fascinating Podcast about Food!

This is an awesome podcast that asks important questions about food. We should all be thinking about these questions given how prevalent food is in our lives. Ian is a very thoughtful host who asks thought-provoking questions while also maintaining a light conversational tone.

Rosemary Wolohan Bierbaum ,

Thought about food

From the time I first listened to one of these podcasts, I have been struck by the great care given to clarity and honesty by both the host and his guests. I didn’t know much about the concepts of food justice and food sovereignty, although the little I had heard appealed to me greatly. I am still no expert, but Professor Werkheiser is broadening my knowledge with each episode, and I always look forward to the next one. He is so approachable and interesting that I’m sure I would greatly enjoy having a one-on-one conversation with him, and if I recorded it, I think I’d be tempted to call it, “My Dinner with Ian!“

Velius Spanoulias ,

Tough to beat

Ian is a highly skilled speaker and interviewer, to say nothing of his insights on these subjects. Cannot recommend more highly! Also, I hear that if you write down the first letter of his every third sentence, you get a secret message.

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