300 episodes

The Top Secrets of Marketing & Sales podcast provides tips on how to increase sales, improve profit margins and grow your business. Each week, we address issues related to important topics like targeting your ideal prospects, fine-tuning your messaging, attracting the clients you need, monetizing social media, the MVPs of Marketing and Sales and much more. From mindset to marketing and prospecting to podcasting, the Top Secrets podcast helps B2B and B2C entrepreneurs, professionals and salespeople get more of the customers and clients they need so they can do more of the work they love.

Top Secrets of Marketing & Sales David Blaise

    • Business
    • 4.3 • 10 Ratings

The Top Secrets of Marketing & Sales podcast provides tips on how to increase sales, improve profit margins and grow your business. Each week, we address issues related to important topics like targeting your ideal prospects, fine-tuning your messaging, attracting the clients you need, monetizing social media, the MVPs of Marketing and Sales and much more. From mindset to marketing and prospecting to podcasting, the Top Secrets podcast helps B2B and B2C entrepreneurs, professionals and salespeople get more of the customers and clients they need so they can do more of the work they love.

    Become a 100K a Month Producer Without Losing Your Marbles

    Become a 100K a Month Producer Without Losing Your Marbles

    To become a 100K a month producer without losing your marbles means building your business properly. The issue that I've seen with a you-centric business is it's almost like you're building a cocoon around yourself. You're starting out with this business and you're doing things, and the more things you do, the more you're weaving this cocoon around yourself, and you sort of isolate yourself in the middle of everything.



    And then when it comes time to grow, you don't really know how to do it because you're stuck in the middle of this whole thing. And so for most people who want to grow beyond what they're just capable of doing themselves or who want to create a business that could exist separately from them, where they could say, "I own that business, but I'm not operating in it every single day of the week." That requires an entirely different mindset and entirely different approach.





    David: Hi and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, cohost Jay McFarland and I will be discussing how to become a 100K a month producer without losing your marbles. Hi Jay.







    Jay: Hey, David. It's great to talk about this issue because I think, you know, people imagine I'm going to be an entrepreneur and they think about the money and the lifestyle and what they did is they actually created a job that they're working, you know, 60 hours a week, 70 hours a week. They're not making progress. And so they've created a job and they were actually trying to create a lifestyle. And so that can be very difficult.



    David: Yeah, it definitely can. And I think the whole idea of trying to do it all for many people is difficult.



    And different people have different tolerances for pain. So some people need to hire earlier. Some people can afford to wait. They have the bandwidth to be able to do that. I know personally for myself, I had to hire early because there were specific skills that I just wasn't good at. And there are certain skills that you have to have in business, and if you're not good at them, you're going to have to hire for them.



    So for me, I ended up doing it sooner rather than later, and I did it wrong. In the early stages, I ended up hiring another salesperson just like me. So we had two people who were good at sales and nobody who was good at doing the numbers and things like that. So you learn from those mistakes. But, if you want to become a 100K a month producer without losing your marbles, you need to focus on what are the things that actually need to happen in this business, well and consistently, and then do what it takes to get all that in place.



    Jay: Do you think it's possible for somebody to be a 100K producer on their own? I know you said it was difficult or you had to move sooner. I'm just curious. Do you think that somebody could say, no, I'm going to do it on my own?



    David: I know it's possible because I have clients who have done it. And I marvel with them. When they tell me what they're doing and they tell me how they're doing it, I'm like, "I don't know how you do that."



    I mean, a longtime client of ours, I love her so much, her name was Barb Burcham. She passed away a few years ago. But Barb was great. She did over a million dollars a year in promotional product sales, essentially by herself. I think she might have had an assistant at one point.



    And she did it on small orders. She participated in one of our mastermind discussions and she was talking about how she just has all these clients and she's taking a lot of small orders, but she was able to do it. And I asked her, well, what sort of CRM are you using? She was doing it in Outlook and I was like, "I don't know how you do that. I have no idea how you do that."



    There's another great client of ours, a guy named John, who does over a million dollars a year, primarily by himself.

    • 16 min
    What Top Performers Do Better and Differently

    What Top Performers Do Better and Differently

    When you think about what top performers do better and differently, consider this. It's almost impossible to overfill your sales pipeline. So if you focus on making sure that you've got more there than you actually need, you're going to be in much better shape.



    Just look at the numbers, if you've got a hundred people in your pipeline and 1% of them close today, you made a sale.



    If you've got ten people in your pipeline and 1% of them close today, you did not make a sale. So from that standpoint, just the basic numbers say you want to make sure that you've got enough qualified leads in your pipeline so that somebody can close today.







    David: Hi, and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, cohost Jay McFarland and I will be discussing what $100,000 per month producers do better and differently. Welcome, Jay.







    Jay: Hey, thank you so much, David. I really can't wait to talk about this, because it will allow people to look at what they're doing and compare themselves.



    And sometimes when you don't have that, it's hard to know if you're doing things right. And you're kind of more shooting in the dark than actually being purposeful about your daily activities.



    David: Exactly. And I think a lot of people, if they just really enjoy what they do and they focus every day on meeting new people and interacting and trying to find solutions, that's all great.



    But if you want to be able to start achieving some of the financial goals that you have for yourself, then it really makes a lot of sense to say, okay, what are the people who are doing this extremely successfully from a financial standpoint, doing better and differently, or at least differently than what I'm doing now.



    Jay: Yeah. I saw in your ebook that time is significant. Top producers leverage their time better than others. How do you go about leveraging your time better?



    David: You know, it seems so difficult, and yet when you really boil it down, it's actually pretty simple. If you think about the idea of being in front of a prospect or a potential client, and if that person has the ability to spend a thousand dollars with you, that's different if that person has the ability to spend $10,000 with you, or $50,000 with you, or a hundred thousand dollars with you over the course of the next year or the next couple of years, or their entire working lifetime.



    And so leveraging your time can start with things as simple as deciding in advance what types of prospects you want to be in front of. And ideally, they're going to be the type of people who actually need what you have to offer, purchase it on a regular basis, have decent budgets, have the ability to spend, the willingness to spend and the money to pay the bills after they've ordered it.



    Jay: Yeah, so identifying that client, first of all. And then I think that there is a tendency, especially for the smaller business owner, to get caught up in things that they could be having other people do.



    And so figuring out where your time is best spent is going to be a key to being able to grow.



    David: Yeah, no question. And so if you think about leveraging your time, that does go directly to that point, which is to say, okay, which activities are not worth the amount of money that I'd like to be making on an hourly basis, daily basis, weekly basis.



    Because if you're engaged in those activities, they will just never pay more than they're worth. If you're doing administrative tasks, that could be done by somebody else for 10 or $15 an hour. Then those tasks are not going to produce a hundred dollars or 200 or $500 an hour for you. They're only ever going to be worth that amount of money.



    So by delegating those things to the extent that you can,

    • 14 min
    A Decent, Worthy Goal for Promo Distributors

    A Decent, Worthy Goal for Promo Distributors

    In a special Saturday edition of the Top Secrets podcast, David Blaise explains to co-host Jay McFarland why 100K per month in promo sales is not just doable, it's also a decent, worthy goal for promo distributors who aren't there yet.







    Comment below and let us know if you agree or disagree.







    David: Hi, and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, cohost Jay McFarland and I will be discussing the significance of each $100,000 in promotional product sales. Welcome back, Jay.



    Jay: Hey, it's great to be back with you. David, and I really want to talk about this topic a little bit. I know you've put a lot of emphasis on that first hundred thousand dollars.



    What makes that so significant, so special?



    David: Well, that's a great question. I mean, it's the first hundred thousand dollars, it's every a hundred thousand dollars thereafter. And there's no real magic significance, I don't think. But if you bring in a thousand dollars sale or a $2,000 sale or a $5,000 sale -- and I'm talking in the promotional products industry primarily, because that's who this material was put together for -- it's helpful. It's good.



    It feels good to bring those sales in. But, ultimately that can be done in a day or a couple of days or a week. And I think sometimes it's just good to have sort of benchmarks that are out there a little bit. So generating a hundred thousand dollars in sales of promotional products for most people is an accomplishment.



    Whether that happens in the course of six months, or three months, or a month, or a week, or a day. It doesn't usually happen for most people in a day. The industry at large generally does about a quarter of a million dollars in annual sales. Most salespeople do roughly that on average in the industry. So each hundred thousand dollars is actually pretty significant.



    And I think that when you look at trying to make an impact and trying to generate the revenue that you need to be able to support the lifestyle that you'd like to become accustomed to, it's good to sort of stretch yourself a bit and to ask yourself. Okay. What am I doing to get to my next Hundred K in revenue or my first, if you're just getting started.



    Hitting that first hundred thousand is usually pretty significant for people.



    Jay: Yeah. I'm guessing most people remember that first hundred thousand. But I think you're right. You know, were they looking at that moment as benchmark? Were they saying " this is going to be significant and this is our plan on how we're going to reach it."



    Or was it kind of haphazard and what a great milestone, but what did they do ahead of time to get to that point?



    David: Yeah, and that's the question that each person has to ask themselves. What did I do to get me to this point? How long did it take to get there as well? I mean, there are some people who spend, and whether they start out part-time or whatever it is they're doing, some people spend six months or a year or a couple of years even before they hit six figures in gross sales.



    When you're doing that, you're not earning a lot of money. Some people start out and they're doing it part-time. They're doing it on the side. So if they generate a hundred grand in gross sales, it seems like a really significant accomplishment for them.



    But if you look at the amount of time that it took to get there, sometimes you have to say, okay, well could I have done that faster? And for people who really want to make their mark and want to be able to generate significant sales, I think that it's just a decent sort of benchmark to look at, to say, "okay, how long is it going to take me to get to my next a hundred thousand in gross sales? Is it going to take me a year? Is it going to take me six months? It's going to take me a quarter.

    • 11 min
    Your Next 100K in Promo Sales

    Your Next 100K in Promo Sales

    Hi, I'm David Blaise and over the past few days, I've been sharing some resources designed to help professionals in the promotional products industry to achieve some of the financial goals that are important to them, including your next 100K in promo sales.







    Last week, I released a free ebook entitled How to Make $100,000 Every Month in Promotional Product Sales.







    To some people, that sounds like a lot of money. To others, particularly those who've already achieved it, it might sound just like another day at the office.



    So on Monday of this week, I released a video entitled "Your Next $100,000 in Promotional Product Sales."



    If you're brand new to the industry, your next hundred thousand in promotional product sales might be your first hundred thousand.



    If that's the case, then hopefully that topic might seem pretty exciting to you.



    If you've already done a hundred thousand dollars in promotional product sales, then your next 100K will get you to $200,000.



    That would be double.



    So hopefully the idea of doubling would be pretty exciting to you as well.



    Of course, If you've already done $200,000 in sales, an extra hundred thousand will get you to 300.



    That's a 50% increase over where you were at 200. Hopefully, that's still exciting.



    But even as you continue to grow, each additional hundred thousand dollars in sales -- every Next 100K -- will get you closer to your desired sales, profitability, and income goals.



    One of the first things I addressed in the $100K ebook is the huge difference between gross sales, gross profit, and personal income.



    When we talk about Your Next $100,000, we can refer to any or all of the above.



    If your goal is to grow your personal income an extra hundred thousand dollars, that's quite a bit different than if you just want to grow your gross sales by that much.



    However, many of the things you have to do in order to make that happen, are the same.



    It will often start with top-line growth -- bringing in the additional sales necessary to generate the profits you need to increase your personal income.



    That's why in video 1, when we talked about Your Next $100K, we discussed the fact that every sale you make is going to come from one of two primary groups of people.



    If you're just starting out, those sales will actually come from just one primary group of people.



    But as you take action, and bring new clients through the door, you will create another source of clients -- another source of future business -- that will often be worth far more to you than the new customers you're creating when you're just starting out.



    Also, today I'm releasing video 2 in this series along with a free copy of my $100K Cheat Sheet.



    The $100K Cheat Sheet is a single-page document, but it really could (and should) be worth an additional hundred thousand dollars to you in your business over the course of the next year, IF you download it, print it out, think through the answers and take action on the recommendations made in that one-page document.



    In order to make it even easier for you to accomplish this, in today's video, I'll walk you through exactly how to complete the cheat sheet in a way that doesn't require a lot of time, doesn't require a lot of thought, and will help you to generate a level of focus that you may not have had in your business for a very long time.



    One of the big advantages to the concept of Your Next $100K is that it will keep you FOCUSED instead of just thinking,

    • 6 min
    How to Compete with Internet Sellers

    How to Compete with Internet Sellers

    I think for people who are looking to compete with internet sellers, one of the things they can do is say, "Yeah, you know, now anybody can set up a website. Anybody can say anything they want. But what if something goes wrong? Who are you going to talk to? You know, if you and I are working together, if there's a problem, I'm going to be the one to handle it. Do you know who'd be handling it on the other end?"







    David: Hi, and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, cohost Jay McFarland and I will be discussing how to compete with internet sellers. Welcome back, Jay.







    Jay: Thank you, David. So glad to be here, and this is a big deal. I've found sometimes I don't even know that there's an internet seller that I'm competing with.



    In fact, the other day I was trying to send somebody to our website and we found out somebody had grabbed a domain very close to ours. They're offering a close product of ours. And now, every time somebody mistypes in our domain, they're going to go to one of our competitors. And I'm incredibly frustrated by it and dealing with that very situation right now.



    David: Yeah. Squatters, they call them. Domain squatters. Very frustrating.



    Jay: Yeah.



    David: Yeah. Well, I know a lot of people, particularly people who have brick-and-mortar businesses, for the most part -- but they may have an online presence -- often struggle with the fact that internet sellers can sometimes seem to create better deals. Because they have lower overhead or they have more connections, or they have different connections. Or because of the fact that the client themselves are doing more of the work.



    Because if somebody can go to a website, pick something out, order it and not involve a human being, they can certainly save money if they've got that technology set up.



    But there are limits, and depending on the industry you're in, depending on what you're selling, very often human beings can have a bigger advantage, and human beings can also justify higher prices because of the level of service they provide.



    And I think that's something that people tend to forget about. They tend to think in terms of, "okay, I can't compete with this. These online sellers are able to provide stuff faster and cheaper." But faster and cheaper is not always everything that people are looking for.



    Jay: I would say most times faster and cheaper...



    David: yeah.



    Jay: is not. But I also think that we've kind of accepted faster and cheaper in a lot of ways. You know, it's another one of those things that's changed with the pandemic. I think one of the other problems is that you can put anything on a website. You can say anything.



    It's not like when you walk in a store and you can see how clean the store is. You can see. You can feel the quality of the product. You have all of this tangible nature to it. That's all gone and we're ordering stuff that we just see pretty pictures of. That makes it very hard to compete on the internet.



    David: It can, but actually that knowledge and the ability to communicate that can also do something that's very important for terrestrial sellers, shall we say. People who operate in non-internet businesses.



    And that's that they can. Or so the seeds of doubt, they can basically say pretty much exactly what you said. Yeah. You know, there's a big difference between seeing an image on your screen and then getting it, and having it arrive, and having it be different or look different, you just don't know that.



    And that even goes back to printed catalogs. There are a lot of times you get a mail-order catalog, you look at something and go, Wow, that looks great. And then you order it and arrives and it seems nothing like what it is that you thought you ordered.

    • 16 min
    More is Never the Solution to Too Much

    More is Never the Solution to Too Much

    If you recognize that more is never the solution to too much, then you can really start to think about what actually has to be done? What could potentially be eliminated so that I can focus my time and attention on the most important things that are actually going to move the needle for myself and my business?





    David: Hi and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, cohost Jay McFarland and I will be discussing the topic more is never the solution to too much. Welcome back, Jay.







    Jay: Thank you so much. I love the title of this podcast and I think it embodies something that we all do. Sometimes we think that because something's not working, it means we're not throwing enough at it.



    So let's just throw more and throw more and throw more, and that will solve the problem. And perhaps we're making it worse. Or at the very least, we're wasting a lot of time and money that could be used more effectively in other places.



    David: Yeah, so often people talk about, and we've talked about in the past, time management. And time management is maybe not the best term to always think of. Because what it implies is that you have to do all these things and you have to manage it better, that maybe you're messing things up there.



    But if you recognize that more is never the solution to too much, then you can really start to think about what actually has to be done? What could potentially be eliminated so that I can focus my time and attention on the most important things that are actually going to move the needle for myself and my business? And I think for a lot of us, with COVID and people working from home, it probably caused a lot of people to start thinking about what is the most important aspect of what I do? And how many things that I used to do before, really don't have to be done anymore?



    And for anybody who's watching this, if you haven't gone through this exercise, I would really encourage you to consider this. Because it's very likely there are things you're doing that you've been doing for a long time, and it's always the way we've done it. We think we have to keep doing it. But sometimes, that's not the case.



    So if you find yourself trying to figure out how you're going to get it all done, maybe it's time to start thinking in terms of "what could I potentially eliminate or what could I delegate so that I could really focus on the things that are going to generate the best results for myself?"



    Jay: Yeah. You mentioned the pandemic and I know personally, it has changed my work style and time management so dramatically on both sides. On the one side, I don't have the guy coming up to my cubicle every 10 minutes telling me the story about the movie he just watched, right? So I don't have those interruptions anymore.



    But on the other side, I have to now be self-efficient, self-productive. Nobody's looking over my shoulder. Sometimes I don't speak to other employees for days or weeks, and so...



    David: mm-hmm.



    Jay: I have to totally manage that time. So, I think the pandemic has changed work forever. And we're all having to learn how to, manage that.



    David: Yeah, it definitely changed things and that's why I think this idea, this topic. Is so important. Because what I've found is that people are overwhelmed. A lot of people are overwhelmed. People are constantly busy, busy, busy. They're doing different things all the time.



    Some people wear "busy" as a badge of honor. I don't really see it that way anymore. And there was a long period of time where I did. It's like, "Oh yeah, I'm really busy. I'm really busy." And then I realized, wait a second, what does that mean anyway? Does busy mean productive? Because if busy means productive, then okay, it's good to be busy. But if you're busy just for the sake of busy, it's not.

    • 16 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Mxsandy12 ,

Amazing sales and marketing pod!

Really helpful and super interesting!

Andieisme ,

Change is good

Thank you for adding a second voice/perspective to your podcast. I love the mini q&a and that some of the questions I have are asked and answered.

fxdii ,

Great ideas

Listen and you will get some great ideas for selling promotional products. Theses short messages help me to stay on track.

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