166 episodes

Lessons to help you understand and speak normal-speed American English.

Wadjasay? American English Pronunciation Practice Follow on Telegram: https://t.me/NativeEnglishLessons

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 5 Ratings

Lessons to help you understand and speak normal-speed American English.

    Linking Sounds Lesson 1: Y and W glides

    Linking Sounds Lesson 1: Y and W glides

    This is the first in a series of lessons about connected speech. One of the ways in which we link syllables and words together is with "glides" -- for example a Y sound is added between "be" and "able" so it sounds like "bee yable".  Listen to the sentences and you'll get the idea of these glides.
    Y glides:
    /iy/
    1) I would like to be able to speak fluent English.
    2) Will you be able to come?
    3) She likes to create small sculptures. 
    4) Let’s create something new.
    5) My dog loves being in the house.
    6) Mary is seeing her French cousin for the first time.


    /ey/
    5) Please say it again.
    6) Lay it down over there.
    7) He’s paying for the new table.
    8) We’ll be staying at a hotel. 
    9) Don’t stay up too late.
    10) She’s praying for her father.


    /ai/
    11) She’s in her room crying.
    12) I can hear him sighing.
    13) My son is trying out for the basketball team.
    14) She is very naive.
    15) I will bring my own soup. 
    16) He will be flying here from Naples.
    17) The cat is eyeing my dinner. It’s fish.


    /ɔy/
    18) He has a new toy airplane.
    19) The cat was toying with the mouse.
    20) His name is Roy Adams.
    21) He has a boyish face.
    22) My sister is annoying me.
    ==========================
    W glides:
    23) His car is a bluish color.
    24) Where are you going?
    25) However, she does speak Hungarian.
    26) You should do it now.
    27) I wish that dog would go away.
    28) Now is the time for us to leave.


    /uw/ 
    29) I’ll sign my name in blue ink.
    30) Are you in the kitchen?
    31) His name is Stuart.


    /ow/ 
    32) There’s no art in that room.
    33) The word “Noel” is often heard in Christmas songs.
    34) No one is listening to us.


    /aw/ 
    35) How is it going?
    36) We need some more flour.
    37) How’re you doing?
    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 49 min
    Practice with some fancy six-syllable words.

    Practice with some fancy six-syllable words.

    Here are some sentences with six-syllable words.
    1- In the 1960s people experimented with hallucinogenic drugs. 
    2- Covid 19 has resulted in the hospitalization of too many people.
    3- Please do NOT eat mushrooms which are not identifiable as safe and harmless.
    4- Alien organisms might not be easily categorizable.
    5- After lengthy reconsideration of your proposal, my answer is still NO.
    6- I was the beneficiary of my late uncle’s largesse. He was a generous man.
    7- I would like to study extraterrestrial biodiversity. 
    8- She is planning to write a lengthy autobiography. 
    9- Please show us your identification. 
    10- Is it possible to be a humanitarian revolutionary?
    11- Deep sea creatures often exhibit bioluminescence. 
    12- Sometimes people overgeneralize when they telecommunicate.
    13- I am studying the electromagnetic spectrum.
    14- Lack of precipitation is leading to the desertification of the American southwest.
    15- She was easily identifiable by her short purple hair and long pointy nose.
    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 37 min
    Mini-podcast: A tough course

    Mini-podcast: A tough course

    Crazy English. We pronounce "ough" in too many ways...

    I thought microbiology was a tough course, but my professor was a thorough teacher. I studied hard throughout, and in the end I learned what he taught even though it was a challenge.
    1- I thought microbiology was a tough course…
    2…but my professor was a thorough teacher. 
    3- I studied hard throughout…
    4…and in the end I learned what he taught…
    5…even though it was a challenge.
    You did it! Good job.


    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 14 min
    Sentences about parachutes

    Sentences about parachutes

    1- Do you think you know what a parachute looks like? 
    2- Guess what: There are tons of parachute types out there, and you probably don’t know ’em all! 
    3- Here’s a rundown of several of the normal and not-so-normal types of parachutes… 
    3a- …that help skydivers (and far-flung cargo) make their way softly back down to terra firma.
    4- Round parachutes were the first tools for fabric descent. 
    5- If your mental image of a parachute involves a big, inverted pouch of fabric… 
    5a-…suspended over a helpless jumper, then it’s a round parachute you’re thinking of. 
    6- Round parachutes served a purpose for a very long time (and still do, in some very specific circumstances)…
    7-…but there were a few issues with this design that caused them to eventually fade from regular use. 
    Commercial break ! Do you ever wonder what it costs to produce and share a podcast like wadjasay? Let me tell you. Putting my podcasts online so you can listen and download them costs $12 per month for up to 3 hours. If I want to go over 3 hours, It costs more. The software I use for recording and editing costs about $16 per month. So my current cash out-of-pocket expenses total $28 dollars per month. 
    Then there’s my time. Each recorded hour of the podcast requires on average two to three hours of time for research, preparation, recording, editing, and uploading the finished podcast. So if I upload three hours of podcasts each month, and pay myself an imaginary $20 per hour, and I’m very efficient so it only takes me 6 hours to make the 3 hours of podcasts, I owe myself $120 per month. So the grand total? I’m investing at least $150 per month in cash and my time to keep wadjasay running.
    In the first week after I upload a new podcast, it is usually downloaded between 50 and 100 times. I am recording this on March 16th, and I presently have two monthly subscribers to wadjasay. (Thank you, and thank you!) But what about everyone else? If you take the time to download the podcast, I can only conclude that you find it helpful. If that’s true, please help support it. A few dollars a month would tell me that I’m not wasting my time and that my efforts are worth continuing. 
    Thank you! Now back to practicing English.
    8- First off: They’re (gulp!) unsteerable. Secondly, they’re (double gulp!) not super-likely to land lightly.
    9- Cruciform parachutes can be seen as kinda-sorta a subset of round parachutes. 
    10- They’re not round, per se, but they’re certainly not the square modern parachutes we use for most purposes today. 
    11- The difference is this: their squared-off profile decreases oscillation 
    12- …and ends up resulting in fewer landing injury rates for the jumpers and cargo that dangle helplessly below. 
    13- The bump at the end is about 25% softer than the cruciform’s rounder cousin, 
    14-…but it’s still nowhere near as good an idea as the modern skydiving parachute, so this one also stays firmly in the military world.
    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 50 min
    Types of Parachutes

    Types of Parachutes

    What parachute types are there? Do you think you know what a parachute looks like? Guess what: There are tons of parachute types out there, and you probably don’t know ’em all! Here’s a rundown of several of the normal and not-so-normal types of parachutes that help skydivers (and far-flung cargo) make their way softly back down to terra firma.
    1. ROUND PARACHUTES
    Round parachutes were the first tools for fabric descent. If your mental image of a parachute involves a big, inverted pouch of fabric suspended over a helpless jumper, then it’s a round parachute you’re thinking of. Round parachutes served a purpose for a very long time (and still do, in some very specific circumstances), but there were a few issues with this design that caused them to eventually fade from regular use. First off: They’re (gulp!) unsteerable. Secondly, they’re (double gulp!) not super-likely to land lightly.
    2. CRUCIFORM PARACHUTES
    Cruciform parachutes can be seen as kinda-sorta a subset of round parachutes. They’re not round, per se, but they’re certainly not the square modern parachutes we use for most purposes today. The difference is this: their squared-off profile decreases oscillation and ends up resulting in fewer landing injury rates for the jumpers and cargo that dangle helplessly below. The bump at the end is about 25% softer than the cruciform’s rounder cousin, but it’s still nowhere near as good an idea as the modern skydiving parachute, so this one also stays firmly in the military world.
    3. ROGALLO WINGS
    You’ll pretty much never see a rogallo parachute in the sport skydiving world — but you just might see one in paragliding, where they’re commonly used as rescue parachutes. The wing design is highly recognizable: two partial conic surfaces with both cones pointing forward, vaguely triangular or hang-glidery in appearance. Springy and flexible, the Rogallo wing is most often seen in toy kites, but has been used to construct descent parachutes for spacecraft, as well as provide an airfoil for ultralight powered aircraft like trikes.
    4. RAM AIR PARACHUTES
    So what are you most likely to see on a skydiving dropzone? Far and away, you’ll be looking at the venerable ram air parachute. As a matter of fact, just about everyone in the sky today uses ram air canopies to get down. You’ll recognize them instantly: a square or rectangular fabric wing, wherein a top and bottom sheet of nylon are attached by a set of fabric ribs between them.
    That’s the magic, right there: The ribs divide the parachute into a set of individual cells that inflate when fast-moving air is pushed in through the front, and inflates the parachute all the way to the back. When that inflation happens, the wing inflates to the point that it becomes a steerable airfoil. Bingo! A stable flying machine that slows you down, steers like a dream and “flares” to land you as softly as a pretty little fairy princess.
    My thanks to the folks at Long Island Skydiving for permission to share this information. To learn more about skydiving, please visit their website.
    To see the page on their blog about parachute types, click here.
    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 6 min
    Collocations with "back"

    Collocations with "back"

    1 - Gymnasts have broad, muscular backs.
    2 - I worked in the garden all morning and now my back aches.
    3 - He broke his back in a terrible car accident.
    4 - Have you ever read The Hunchback of Notre Dame?
    5 - My dog always stretches his back and yawns when he wakes up.
    6 - My cat arched his back and hissed loudly at the neighbor’s dog.
    7 - She leaned her back against the door and looked at me suspiciously.
    8 - He patted and scratched his dog’s back affectionately. 
    9 - Tall people are prone to back trouble.
    10 - I need an office chair with good back support.
    11 - If there’s a problem, please tell me to my face. Don’t go behind my back.
    12 - He got a bad case of Covid and was flat on his back for weeks.
    13 - What are you carrying on your back?
    14 - She stood with her back to the fire, sipping hot chocolate. 
    15 - Watch your back—there are people who would like to get you fired.
    16 - The boss gave me a slap on the back and told me I was going to get a raise soon.
    17 - The children were sitting back to back in a large cardboard box.
    18 - We could only get seats at the back of the stadium for the Taylor Swift concert.
    19 - I prefer to sit near the front of the bus, not at the back.
    20 - The dog wasn’t out front, so we went around back and looked for him there.


    Intro & Outro Music: La Pompe Du Trompe by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.com
    Support the showYou can now support my podcasts and classes:
    Help Barry pay for podcast expenses--thank you!

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

flyingAlmond ,

Thank you & please continue

I feel so blessed when I found your podcast.
This is exactly what I’m looking for!!!
The “listen and repeat” is so helpful. This allows me to learn to speak and imitate the intonation like a kid.
Your advise and tips here and there regarding the pronunciation and intonation help me learn and understand like an adult.
Thank you so much and please continue this podcast, I look forward to your renewals!!!!

EdnLove ,

Best way to practice

This is one of the perfect way to practice speaking. I hope we get more of this kind of practices, because everyone else keeps speaking while we listen, but what we really wanna do is speak, and this podcast is the best way to do that. Thank you Barry!!

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