81 episodes

I am a husband and father with multiple sclerosis (MS) and that affects my life and work in many ways. Trained as an artist to imagine the possible, as a disabled person with MS I also experience the hard truth of physical and cognitive limitation. On the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast I share my experiences, challenges and triumphs as a patient with MS. The podcast develops my Disability Consciousness and bridges to his caregivers, doctors, the disabled community, and community-at-large. As the owner of Hoppin Hot Sauce, I experience firsthand the special challenges faces by disabled entrepreneurs.

What's The Matter With Me? Podcast John Hoppin

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0, 5 Ratings

I am a husband and father with multiple sclerosis (MS) and that affects my life and work in many ways. Trained as an artist to imagine the possible, as a disabled person with MS I also experience the hard truth of physical and cognitive limitation. On the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast I share my experiences, challenges and triumphs as a patient with MS. The podcast develops my Disability Consciousness and bridges to his caregivers, doctors, the disabled community, and community-at-large. As the owner of Hoppin Hot Sauce, I experience firsthand the special challenges faces by disabled entrepreneurs.

    Compounded Trauma

    Compounded Trauma

    Compounded trauma is when things make us upset, because they remind us of traumatic situations that we've experienced before, causing us to relive them.







    When I feel this way, naming the feelings I am having, and explicitly connecting them, can be a way to overcome them.







    The thing is, my wife likes creepy stuff. I don't like watching surgery. When the scalpels come out, I check out of the movie.







    Thank you for tuning in to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast. This episode is about compounded trauma, reliving trauma, traumatic experiences that we've had, and just living and multiplying, compounding them, living them over and over again.















    You're listening to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast. My name is John I'm 41 years old husband, father of two, small business owner, radio DJ, podcaster, and I have multiple sclerosis. So I made this podcast to share what I'm going through.







    Every thing went nuts last week because Marc Maron mentioned my hot sauce on Instagram and hundreds of thousands of people follow him and of these people, there's a hardcore kernel of supporters that do whatever he says. So, a lot of people bought Hoppin Hot Sauce last week. Those people are good, they're welcome to the movement. Hoppin Hot Sauce is a movement, the Pepper Show is a thing, get down or lay down, welcome to the team.







    But don't get it twisted, you're listening to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast, talking about compounding trauma, living it over and over again.







    I want to give shout outs first







    Give a shout out to Katie, my old friend, Katie. Katie said that she actually listens to Marc Maron's WTF podcast and my podcast, What's The Matter With Me? on the way in to work. *child yells* Anyway, that's Koko, the kids are around. I'm just like you guys. Everyone's in the house going nuts at all times.







    Anyway, Katie wrote me an email, shout out to Katie. She turned me on to the Marriott. We would go there and at the Marriott, they have like a lounge for guests and visitors that they would stock with newspapers. On our lunch break, we would just go hang out in this lounge. Pretty much take over half the lounge and kick back. I had a couple other friends I worked with, Matt, Jeremy went up in there. Anyway, Katie, my old lunch buddy.







    Shout outs to Julia. Julia wrote me a cool email. She's been listening since I was on the YEG MS podcast hosted by Sean Wingrave, an MS podcast out of Edmonton, Ontario.







    *child yells: Frog and Toad are Friends!* Anyway, Frog and Toad Are Friends, things are happening around here.







    (Julia) said she was just diagnosed a year ago. She made a cool art piece. She was inspired by the interview I did with Sean. We talked about Japanese proverb about fall down seven times, stand up eight and she made an artwork. She sent me a picture. Anyway, pretty cool. You give me an email via the contact form. And I'll give you a shout out. You send email, I give shout out.







    All right, it's the What's The Matter With Me? podcast.







    Let's get into the meat of it, compounding trauma by reliving it.







    I was having a dream or watching a video or television. I can't really remember, but I was having a dream of vision. I was having a vision of a doctor diagnosing a patient, and I had a lot of feelings,

    • 11 min
    To overcome isolation, we need to put ourselves out there

    To overcome isolation, we need to put ourselves out there

    We all need to put in effort to get ourselves out there, because it can be hard on your mental health to be so isolated. It's important to be part of a community, and be involved, and have exchange with people.







    * I've been spending a lot of my creative effort trying to keep my business open.* Crippled crisp review is two disabled Dutch comedians eating potato chips together. * I have begun producing radio shows in my home Studio. The first one will air Thursday.* People are experiencing part of what it is like to be a disabled person.* It is hard to get around. Hard to participate. Hard to interact with each other. It can be isolating. For our mental health, we need to get out there.















    Begin Transcript







    JOHN HOPPIN: All right. What's The Matter With Me? podcast. Thank you for tuning in. Sorry, I've been kind of out of it. I haven't been here in a couple months. I have recorded a couple of Hoppin Hot Sauce Pepper Shows. I've been spending a lot of my creative effort trying to keep my business open. Actually, it's kind of working, but it's taking my focus away from What's The Matter With Me? And my focus isn't here as much as I would like it to be. So as much as it's lame to start with the preamble, there it is.







    So I've been checking out this podcast called The Crippled Crisp Review. Crippled Crisp Review podcast, it's two Dutch disabled comedians who eat potato chips together. The whole thing is on pause for coronavirus, because they're Dutch people. The last episode that they posted up is about a corona… It's episode number 63, a corona chili extravaganza. It says in the notes, "The episode was recorded through Skype. Thank you for listening. Please stay safe with coronavirus. At this time, you can still eat crisps on your own. However, do not organize parties or attend parties, except when it is an online party. We talk about different chili crisps." So they eat chips and talk about them. One guy has cerebral palsy, and the other guy has multiple sclerosis. It's a interesting listen.







    My family is inside brushing their teeth and stuff. I'm in the backyard.







    The radio station KFJC where I often volunteer is shut down, and I've begun producing radio shows in my home studio. And the first one will air Thursday afternoon on KFJC 89.7FM, and KFJC.org. The upside of isolation, this shelter and place isolation, is that the radio station has been putting a lot of effort, and they have been, actually, for years, they've been digitizing their catalog and putting it online, so you can produce and stream stuff from home. And here I am, making this podcast, and I'm in a position to produce content. For everybody who works with KFJC, increasing accessibility will make the radio airwaves more accessible, bring more voices. It's pretty interesting. It's cool.







    So I'll be on KFJC on Thursday afternoon. It's fun to contribute in that way, because it's hard to contribute right now. It's hard to get around, go places, participate with other people, hard to interact. We can get on the internet, but that's kind of it. And either way, since March in the U.S at least, people are experiencing part of what it's like to be a disabled person. Because you can't go places, you can't see people, and you can't do things the same way. You need accommodations. And so disabled people, because that's difficult, they get isolated. And even look at me, I started a business, I'm on the radio, I have a podcast. All this stuff I do, because I want to overcome the isolation of being disabled. But now kind of everyone's in the same boat. Everyone in our culture needs to overcome isolation. So it's like, I don't give myself enough credit to say, I can teach people something.

    • 6 min
    Day 67: New Brace

    Day 67: New Brace

    Day 67 COVID-19 self isolation







    I'm working in the garden, while wearing my new AFO brace in this episode of the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast.

    • 6 min
    This time is important

    This time is important

    Two months into coronavirus self-isolation, I'm thinking about how this is an important time, one that we'll remember forever and that our kids will also remember. In this episode of the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast, I'm thinking about the importance of this time.

    • 2 min
    Principle of Non discrimination

    Principle of Non discrimination

    Welcome back to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast.







    Day 42 of Covid-19 Coronavirus quarantine finds me thinking about the value of disabled life.







    What is the Principle of Non discrimination?







    The principle of non-discrimination seeks “to guarantee that human rights are exercised without discrimination of any kind based on race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status such as disability, age, marital and family status, sexual orientation and gender identity, health status, place of residence, economic and social situation”.Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, General Comment No. 20, Non-discrimination in economic, social and cultural rights; 2009.







    Do disabled people deserve assistance even though they may require more resources than the 'average patient?'







    (When too many patients are in urgent need at the same time), some are proposing to send the disabled to the back of the line. States across the country are looking to their Crisis Standards of Care plans — documents that explain how medical care changes amid the shortages of an unprecedented catastrophe. While each is different, many have a concerning common attribute: When there isn’t enough lifesaving care to go around, those who need more than others may be in trouble.Ari Ne'eman, 'I Will Not Apologize For My Needs,' New York Times, March 23, 2020.















    Begin Transcript







    JOHN HOPPIN: Yes! You are tuned into the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast. My name is John, I'm 40 years old, I have MS (multiple sclerosis), I'm a father and husband, small business owner, radio DJ, podcaster. Right now I'm 40 days into this coronavirus quarantine, on week five at school. Anyhow, it just feels like we're inside forever. I think you all know what I'm talking about, so I've wanted to get in touch. I have had some stuff on my mind.







    First, I want to bring in this idea of the principle of non-discrimination. It's defined by the World Health Organization as, the principle of non-discrimination seeks to guaranteed that human rights are exercised without discrimination of any kind based on race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status, such as disability, age, marital and family status, sexual orientation, gender identity, the health status, place of residence, economic and social situation. That was defined by the Committee on Economic, Social, Cultural rights in 2009.







    This whole outbreak is going on, and it's made me think about the value of disabled life. First, that a disabled life is worth living. I think it's obvious my life rules and it's worth living. I mean it's my life, you can't take it from me. So why think about this stuff? Well, I've read this article called, I Will Not Apologize For My Needs, by Ari Ne’eman, in the New York Times of March 23rd 2020. He writes:







    Times of crisis ask us who we are as a country. As hospitals prepare for shortages in ventilators and other scarce medical resources, many people with disabilities are worried about the answer to that question. In Italy,

    Acceptance

    Acceptance

    Day 23 of self-isolation







    I'm going to try practicing some acceptance to get through this terrible experience of confinement, which is worse than usual.















    Begin Transcript







    JOHN HOPPIN: You are listening to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast. My name is John. I'm 40 years old, husband, father of two, small business owner, radio DJ, podcaster, and I have multiple sclerosis. So I made this podcast to share what I'm going through.







    Let's see. Last episode, recap: I was just rambling about stress. I was stressed out, but I think it's 12 minutes long or something. I couldn't even edit it. I'm not really editing things too much right now.







    I wanted to talk today about Acceptance. The family is all here. I'm baking bread right now, to teach them how to make bread and how yeast works. Right now it's been punched down and reformed and it'll bake in about an hour. So it's rising, getting ready to bake.







    I wanted to talk about acceptance. Because of what's going on, it's totally out of my control. So much stress. I wanted to think about acceptance. I've had to focus on that.







    I'm really uncomfortable in my body a lot of the time. My hand is clenched up and my biceps has spasticity, along with weakness in my right leg, my whole right side really. It's kind of uncomfortable, especially when I'm trying to get comfortable and go sleep, lay there and quiet my mind. Kind of do the same thing I used to do in a yoga. I would think about lengthening my spine and stretching out. It's hard because if I feel really uncomfortable a lot of the time in my own body, then that physical discomfort makes me really upset mentally and I have to deal with that. Hold on a second. I'm going to go inside because I'm cold.







    All right. I'm in the garage. So, discomfort can kind of take over my thoughts when I'm laying there and I have to practice that yoga lengthening of the spine, meditation and focusing on my breath and I'm trying really hard. But you know what can be really helpful is to practice acceptance and to say, "Hey, this is how I'm feeling right now," and that's what's going on. I'm having feelings and emotions and that's all it's happening. I can be mindful and be accepting of my own feelings and just feel them and it's okay and to move on from that. I wanted to talk about that, after that really stressful episode where I really let it all out.







    So I want this practice some acceptance. That's what I'm going to try do and try and get through this terrible experience of confinement that is worse than usual. All right. Thank you for listening to the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast You can get past episodes on Apple Podcast and at whatsthematterwithme.org. Thank you for tuning into the What's The Matter With Me? Podcast.

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

Joe Pepon ,

Legit good.

I appreciate this podcast as it heightens my awareness of what it means to have MS, what the experience is like, and opens my eyes/ heart to the disabled community in general. I also appreciate John’s attitude of taking on challenges, reflecting on them, and persevering. He maintains a positive attitude and continues with a vision of what is possible. Inspiring.

I’ve also ordered his hot sauce before and plan to get more when I run out as it is legit tasty! I seem to put it on most things I eat.

CinePeg ,

Hope

God Bless John Hoppin! This podcast is a life saver for those of us facing life newly disabled. I have MS as well and John is providing a beacon for us to follow and giving us a voice not only to listen but to represent us. He doesn't candy coat his situation but he always has a positive outlook on his life which for those of us struggling with chronic disease is crucial. Thanks for being brave enough to share your stories.

Jenny Rocky Rockwell ,

Propaganda Rapper 4 Higher

John should have started podcasting right when he came out his mama, because he is such a charismatic, interesting, funny, and sincere orator. What's the Matter with Me is an inspiration, because it fills you with reverence for everyday life and making the most of any situation. While finding enjoyment in absurdity. Life creates a set of unique limitations for everyone. It's the attitude that matters and making time for your passion(s) and committing to a positive attitude while still being tenderly honest about how hard it can be. John brings wit and perseverence to his life story and makes me, an avid listener and fan, want to rise to my better self because I get a dose of his podcast and think "This is how it's done."

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