10 episodes

He was born Hamish Watson, a surfie dude from Sydney - but he could morph into whatever you needed him to be. Hamish is due to be sentenced to jail in early 2019 for swindling a handful of victims out of more than $7m. But these crimes are just the final pages in a resume too thick to staple; for decades he's duped victims in the US, Canada, Britain, Hong Kong and Australia. How did he do it? How did he evade authorities around the world for so long and what's he done with all those tens of millions of dollars he stole?

Who the Hell is Hamish? The Australian

    • News & Politics
    • 4.8, 1.1K Ratings

He was born Hamish Watson, a surfie dude from Sydney - but he could morph into whatever you needed him to be. Hamish is due to be sentenced to jail in early 2019 for swindling a handful of victims out of more than $7m. But these crimes are just the final pages in a resume too thick to staple; for decades he's duped victims in the US, Canada, Britain, Hong Kong and Australia. How did he do it? How did he evade authorities around the world for so long and what's he done with all those tens of millions of dollars he stole?

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

bobfromaccounting18 ,

Too short

Very interesting podcast, but I expected more episodes.

USA Poddict ,

Remarkable young woman

Those who are crying foul over this series are not paying attention. He does not call it a “relationship” until Jane first calls it a “relationship.” He does not call it an “affair” until Jane first calls it an “affair.” It is Jane, not the journalist, who conceded that she knowingly and conscientiously entered into an activity that she knew was wrong, and that she was complicit in the subsequent duplicity (her words, not his). Those who would shelter Jane under a “victim” status deny her own freedom to tell her own story, and completely devalue her expressions of regret and sorrow. Her story is touching and heartfelt and sincere, compelling because she is so sorry for what she did. The magnitude of Jack’s and Beck’s forgiveness—and the depth of her sorrow— is lost when Jane is denied the dignity of expressing her own regret. Her present healing is not found in her ability to extract herself from the wrongdoing, but in acknowledging her small part in it. She is a remarkable young woman and should be treated accordingly. Those who would shift all blame from her, unwittingly suggest that there is nothing she could have done differently to avoid the outcome. In other words, they force her into the role of a powerless victim, the very thing they think they are protecting her from. This series is just outstanding journalism.

SevenDaysBlog ,

Irresponsible and infuriating

The host’s treatment of the discussion of Jane’s experience with Hammish with Beck, Jack, and her grandparents was irresponsible, but his interview with her was absolutely infuriating. To allow these people to discuss their point of view without giving the audience the proper context of understanding it was abuse, not an affair, is bad journalism and a dangerous way to frame the manipulation of a teenage girl. His interview with Jane herself took it to the point of complete lack of journalistic integrity, basic decency, or a fundamental understanding of abuse and victimization. “We all make mistakes at 17” does not describe her experience of being groomed and violated by a man 30 years her senior. This host has no idea what he is doing and should never be allowed to handle a story of such sensitive nature again.

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