83 episodes

Produced at the University of Notre Dame, With a Side of Knowledge started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show. But no matter who we’re talking to—or where we’re talking to them from, be it the other side of a table or virtually from that trusty old walk-in closet—we hope you’ll find that you’re glad you stopped by.

With a Side of Knowledge University of Notre Dame

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 36 Ratings

Produced at the University of Notre Dame, With a Side of Knowledge started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show. But no matter who we’re talking to—or where we’re talking to them from, be it the other side of a table or virtually from that trusty old walk-in closet—we hope you’ll find that you’re glad you stopped by.

    On Museum and Library Discovery—Mikala Narlock and Erika Hosselkus, Notre Dame

    On Museum and Library Discovery—Mikala Narlock and Erika Hosselkus, Notre Dame

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    This episode is a little different from what we usually do, in that the focus isn’t one person’s work but rather a new tool designed to enhance knowledge access for everyone. It’s called Marble, and it’s a collaboration between Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Libraries and Snite Museum of Art developed with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Marble is an online portal that lets users all over the world view and learn about materials from the Snite Museum, Rare Books & Special Collections, and the University Archives in a way that is so cool it made us want to do a show literally about a website.

    And to cover everything that makes Marble special, we tried something else different: Not one but two interviews, with two people who have played distinct roles in its creation.

    First you’ll hear from Mikala Narlock, digital collections librarian at the Hesburgh Libraries, who analyzed how content would be uploaded to Marble. Mikala and host Ted Fox talked on a windy day outside the library about the user experience—the types of artifacts available in the platform, what shows up on your screen when you run a search, why this is different than what existed before, and importantly, how anyone can use it, regardless of whether they have an affiliation with Notre Dame.

    After Mikala, it’s Erika Hosselkus, a special collections curator and Latin American studies librarian at the Hesburgh Libraries who led the content team for the Marble project. Erika and Ted met up in Rare Books and Special Collections at the library, where they talked about how the materials Marble gives people access to can inform teaching, research, and just our collective consciousness, not to mention how digital discovery can actually serve as an important gateway to the physical collections themselves.

    LINKS
    Marble website: marble.nd.eduEpisode Transcript

    • 31 min
    On Medicine, Vietnam, and War Stories—Mike Collins, M.D. and Author

    On Medicine, Vietnam, and War Stories—Mike Collins, M.D. and Author

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    Mike Collins graduated from Notre Dame in 1971 and spent several years working as a truck driver, cab driver, construction laborer, dockworker, and freelance journalist before pursuing medicine. After receiving his M.D. from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, he spent five years in residency at the Mayo Clinic, ultimately serving as chief resident in orthopedic surgery and embarking on a surgical career that has spanned several decades.

    Mike has written two memoirs about his journey as a physician: Hot Lights, Cold Steel, recounting his time as a surgical resident, and Blue Collar, Blue Scrubs, about his days as a laborer trying to get into medical school. Since the publication of Hot Lights, Cold Steel in 2005, he has lectured around the country, and the books are on the required or recommended reading list for many medical schools and pre-medical programs.

    We had the chance to talk to Mike about his latest book, a novel titled All Bleeding Stops. It’s the story of Dr. Matthew Barrett, who is sent to Vietnam as a combat surgeon shortly after completing his residency. While fiction is a departure from Mike’s previous books, he draws heavily on his experience in the operating room to unfold a story that he hopes will bring attention, both within the medical community and beyond, to the very real mental health issues encountered by physicians routinely asked to navigate the line between life and death.

    Setting the story amidst the impossible circumstances that faced those serving in Vietnam makes that point in a particularly affecting way.

    LINKS
    Mike’s Novel: All Bleeding StopsEpisode Transcript

    • 30 min
    Season 5 Trailer

    Season 5 Trailer

    This is a trailer for season 5 of With a Side of Knowledge—which we’re publishing a day after said season launched.

    That’s how the pros do it, right?

    --

    FULL EPISODE TEXT

    Hey, my name’s Ted Fox, and I’m the host of With a Side of Knowledge, a podcast produced at the University of Notre Dame.

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show.

    New episodes are released every other Thursday. Our website is withasideofpod.nd.edu, and you can find us on Twitter and Instagram. In both spots, we are @withasideofpod.

    Thank you for listening. Hopefully this will be the first of many times.

    • 1 min
    On Baseball and Critiquing Things You Love—Katherine Walden, Notre Dame

    On Baseball and Critiquing Things You Love—Katherine Walden, Notre Dame

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    But whether we’re literally sitting down with a guest or talking with them virtually from that trusty old walk-in closet, we hope you’ll find that you’re glad you stopped by.

    To start season 5, host Ted Fox grabbed a cup of coffee and headed to the courtyard outside Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Library, right beneath the famous “Word of Life” mural on the building’s south side. More popularly known as Touchdown Jesus, the mural is a fitting backdrop for a conversation about sports, which is what Katherine Walden and Ted met to talk about—albeit baseball rather than football.

    Katherine is an assistant teaching professor of American studies at Notre Dame and an affiliated faculty member of the Notre Dame Technology Ethics Center. Her research employs data analysis, visualization, and interactive digital mapping to illustrate the scale and scope of Minor League Baseball labor, as well as the historical forces and labor structures that shape Minor League players’ working conditions.

    Why Minor League Baseball? After all, the vast majority of baseball fans’ attention gets devoted to the likes of the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, Boston Red Sox, and the other 27 clubs that make up Major League Baseball.

    But as Katherine points out, 90 percent of professional baseball players are actually Minor Leaguers, who for the most part grind out their days in relative anonymity. Her work has grown out of asking: What happens if we put that 90 percent at the center?

    The answers give all of us who love our national pastime a lot to think about.

    LINKS
    Sporting News Article: Even after overdue salary bump, baseball's minor leaguers still paid far below NBA, NHL counterpartsKatherine on The Uncertain Hour (podcast)Episode Transcript

    • 36 min
    On Fashion History and the Human Story—Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, Author

    On Fashion History and the Human Story—Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell, Author

    Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.

    It’s still a pretty fantastic job.

    This is our season 4 finale, and we’re taking a look back—not at the history of this podcast, but at the history of fashion, and our guide is a great one.

    Kimberly Chrisman-Campbell is an award-winning fashion historian, curator, and journalist and a 2020–21 National Endowment for the Humanities Public Scholar. Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, The Washington Post, Politico, and The Wall Street Journal, and she is the author of three books, including Worn on This Day: The Clothes That Made History, which had its origins as a Twitter account and was published in 2019 by Running Press.

    While we had a lot of questions for her about Worn on This Day—how she found an article of clothing tied to every day of the year, what kind of history this approach allowed her to write, why she picked what she did for the September 11th entry—we also talked about the distinctive role fashion plays in the human story.

    We asked Kimberly about her NEH project, as well, and learned a little bit about American fashion designer Chester Weinberg, whom she’s hoping to reintroduce to a large audience. And then there was her most recent book, The Way We Wed: A Global History of Wedding Fashion, a sequel of sorts to Worn on This Day.

    Fun fact there: The white wedding dress? Not as traditional as you might think.

    LINKS
    Kimberly’s Books: Worn on This Day: The Clothes That Made History and The Way We Wed:  A Global History of Wedding FashionWorn on This Day Twitter:  @WornOnThisDayEpisode Transcript

    • 28 min
    On 3D Printing and the Rise of Industry 4.0—C. Fred Higgs III, Rice University

    On 3D Printing and the Rise of Industry 4.0—C. Fred Higgs III, Rice University

    Before the pandemic, we were the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals out to brunch for informal conversations about their work, and we look forward to being that show again one day. But for now, we’re recording remotely to maintain physical distancing.

    It’s still a pretty fantastic job.

    Fred Higgs is John and Ann Doerr Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rice University, where he is also vice provost for academic affairs and director of the Rice Center for Engineering Leadership. A past winner of a National Science Foundation CAREER Young Investigator Award and a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Fred is the founder and director of the Particle Flow and Tribology Lab at Rice.

    We would try to define what tribology is, but Ted, our host, kind of got it wrong in the interview, and there’s no need to embarrass ourselves twice. The good news is Fred is awesome at explaining things in terms even a non-engineer can understand.

    Back in March, we had the opportunity to watch him give an Edison Lecture hosted by Notre Dame’s College of Engineering—and held virtually, of course—about some of the research they do in his lab in the area of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing. Here he and Ted talked about how 3D printing actually works, some real-world applications that illustrate why you’d do it in the first place, and whether we’ll ever be able to print three-dimensional objects as easily as we use a Xerox machine.

    Before that, though, they spent some time on the rise of intelligent machines and the ensuing paradigm shift for engineers looking to bring products to market. It’s a great example of why Fred and others see ethics as a core component of engineering education.

    LINKS
    Fred’s Research: Particle Flow & Tribology Lab at Rice UniversityEpisode Transcript

    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
36 Ratings

36 Ratings

jpdomer99 ,

One of my favorites!

Love this podcast - I look forward to every episode! I love the range of topics covered and always learn something new!

Pfarrow ,

Can't wait to listen to every episode

I love listening to each episode and even listen to past episodes while waiting for the new one. I learn something new each time.

DomerScholar ,

Great higher ed podcast

Great source of higher ed commentary and insight into ND.

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