86 episodes

Produced at the University of Notre Dame, With a Side of Knowledge started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show. But no matter who we’re talking to—or where we’re talking to them from, be it the other side of a table or virtually from that trusty old walk-in closet—we hope you’ll find that you’re glad you stopped by.

With a Side of Knowledge University of Notre Dame

    • Education
    • 4.8 • 37 Ratings

Produced at the University of Notre Dame, With a Side of Knowledge started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show. But no matter who we’re talking to—or where we’re talking to them from, be it the other side of a table or virtually from that trusty old walk-in closet—we hope you’ll find that you’re glad you stopped by.

    Thank You

    Thank You

    Episode Transcript

    From the University of Notre Dame, this is With a Side of Knowledge. I’m your host, Ted Fox.

    I’ve been saying that for 4+ seasons and more than 65 episodes now, and that’s not counting bonus episodes and some other fun stuff we’ve gotten to do. And because we’ve spent all that time together, I wanted to let you know some things are changing.

    I’m moving to a new position at Notre Dame, and while I initially thought it might make sense to try and move the show with me, I’ve come to realize that wouldn’t quite work.

    Thank you to Cidni Sanders, the University’s executive director of academic communications, for allowing me to think through this and being open to even considering it in the first place. Cidni and I haven’t worked together long, but she has been beyond generous with me.

    The good news, at least if you’ve enjoyed listening over the years, is that the show isn’t going away. All the episodes we’ve released will stay in our feed and on our website at withasideofpod.nd.edu while my colleagues in the Office of the Provost consider what the next chapter of this endeavor might look like.

    So, as we bring this era of With a Side of Knowledge to a close, I’d be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge a few people.

    I want to thank Pat Gibbons, who gave me the freedom and support to create this podcast, as well as all my friends in the provost’s office who have listened to me talk about it—and believe me, it’s been ad nauseum—these last few years.

    I want to thank all of our guests, who have provided us with so many amazing conversations and thoughtful insights along with a healthy dose of laughter.

    And I especially want to thank all of you, the listeners, for hitting play. None of us has enough time in our days, and the fact that you’ve chosen to spend some of it here is something that I will always be grateful for.

    Making this podcast really has been a privilege—it’s one of my favorite things I’ve done in over 17 years of working at this University—so I hope you’ll stick around and see what comes next.

    Thanks again.

    • 2 min
    On ‘One Week in America’—Patrick Parr, Author

    On ‘One Week in America’—Patrick Parr, Author

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    Patrick Parr is the author of two books of nonfiction, both with Chicago Review Press. His first, The Seminarian: Martin Luther King Jr. Comes of Age, was published in 2018 and described by The Wall Street Journal as “original, much-needed and even stirring.”

    Patrick joined host Ted Fox via Zoom to talk about book No. 2, which was released earlier this year. Titled One Week in America: The 1968 Notre Dame Literary Festival and a Changing Nation, its appeal to us, a podcast produced at the university, was immediate. But Patrick doesn’t just chronicle what took place on the Notre Dame campus from Sunday, March 31, through Saturday, April 6, 1968, a story that features an almost unimaginably star-studded lineup of literary and political figures—brought to campus by a group of students, no less—and that included a red-carpet movie premiere in the most unlikely of venues.

    No, the book doesn’t stop there because the festival didn’t exist in a vacuum, and during this particular week in America, that truth became evident in ways prominent and painful.

    Patrick’s own story of how he came to research the 1968 Notre Dame Literary Festival starts where a lot of good writing does: with a question that comes to you in the middle of the night.

    LINKS
    Patrick’s Book: One Week in America: The 1968 Notre Dame Literary Festival and a Changing NationNotre Dame Magazine Story:  Echoes: Sophomore Literary FestivalEpisode Transcript

    • 33 min
    On Foreign Policy and Seeing the Big Picture—Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, Northwestern University

    On Foreign Policy and Seeing the Big Picture—Elizabeth Shakman Hurd, Northwestern University

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    Elizabeth Shakman Hurd is a professor of political science and religious studies and the Crown Chair in Middle East Studies at Northwestern University, where she co-directs the Global Religion and Politics Research Group. The author or co-editor of six books, she specializes in religion in U.S. foreign and immigration policy, the global politics of secularism and religious freedom, religion and the American border, and relations between the U.S., Europe, Turkey, and Iran.

    Elizabeth visited campus as part of a series of policy discussions marking the 20th anniversary of September 11th presented by Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs and Ansari Institute for Global Engagement With Religion. Her keynote, the second event in the three-part series, focused on what she calls the “religion-heavy” foreign policy of the United States’ War on Terror.

    With a patio outside Notre Dame’s Morris Inn as our backdrop, Elizabeth talked with us about some of the issues she addressed in her presentation at the Keough School and why she believes the government should rethink the emphasis it places on religion when acting on the world stage. Her recommendations there draw from testimony she gave to the House Foreign Affairs Committee earlier this year and, it’s worth noting, do not suggest that religion is unimportant, either.

    But before we got to where we are now, we started with a little bit of history.

    LINKS
    Elizabeth’s New Book: Theologies of American ExceptionalismEpisode Transcript

    • 27 min
    On Museum and Library Discovery—Mikala Narlock and Erika Hosselkus, Notre Dame

    On Museum and Library Discovery—Mikala Narlock and Erika Hosselkus, Notre Dame

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    This episode is a little different from what we usually do, in that the focus isn’t one person’s work but rather a new tool designed to enhance knowledge access for everyone. It’s called Marble, and it’s a collaboration between Notre Dame’s Hesburgh Libraries and Snite Museum of Art developed with a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Marble is an online portal that lets users all over the world view and learn about materials from the Snite Museum, Rare Books & Special Collections, and the University Archives in a way that is so cool it made us want to do a show literally about a website.

    And to cover everything that makes Marble special, we tried something else different: Not one but two interviews, with two people who have played distinct roles in its creation.

    First you’ll hear from Mikala Narlock, digital collections librarian at the Hesburgh Libraries, who analyzed how content would be uploaded to Marble. Mikala and host Ted Fox talked on a windy day outside the library about the user experience—the types of artifacts available in the platform, what shows up on your screen when you run a search, why this is different than what existed before, and importantly, how anyone can use it, regardless of whether they have an affiliation with Notre Dame.

    After Mikala, it’s Erika Hosselkus, a special collections curator and Latin American studies librarian at the Hesburgh Libraries who led the content team for the Marble project. Erika and Ted met up in Rare Books and Special Collections at the library, where they talked about how the materials Marble gives people access to can inform teaching, research, and just our collective consciousness, not to mention how digital discovery can actually serve as an important gateway to the physical collections themselves.

    LINKS
    Marble website: marble.nd.eduEpisode Transcript

    • 31 min
    On Medicine, Vietnam, and War Stories—Mike Collins, M.D. and Author

    On Medicine, Vietnam, and War Stories—Mike Collins, M.D. and Author

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for informal conversations about their work—but last season, we needed to record remotely. This year we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup.

    Mike Collins graduated from Notre Dame in 1971 and spent several years working as a truck driver, cab driver, construction laborer, dockworker, and freelance journalist before pursuing medicine. After receiving his M.D. from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, he spent five years in residency at the Mayo Clinic, ultimately serving as chief resident in orthopedic surgery and embarking on a surgical career that has spanned several decades.

    Mike has written two memoirs about his journey as a physician: Hot Lights, Cold Steel, recounting his time as a surgical resident, and Blue Collar, Blue Scrubs, about his days as a laborer trying to get into medical school. Since the publication of Hot Lights, Cold Steel in 2005, he has lectured around the country, and the books are on the required or recommended reading list for many medical schools and pre-medical programs.

    We had the chance to talk to Mike about his latest book, a novel titled All Bleeding Stops. It’s the story of Dr. Matthew Barrett, who is sent to Vietnam as a combat surgeon shortly after completing his residency. While fiction is a departure from Mike’s previous books, he draws heavily on his experience in the operating room to unfold a story that he hopes will bring attention, both within the medical community and beyond, to the very real mental health issues encountered by physicians routinely asked to navigate the line between life and death.

    Setting the story amidst the impossible circumstances that faced those serving in Vietnam makes that point in a particularly affecting way.

    LINKS
    Mike’s Novel: All Bleeding StopsEpisode Transcript

    • 30 min
    Season 5 Trailer

    Season 5 Trailer

    This is a trailer for season 5 of With a Side of Knowledge—which we’re publishing a day after said season launched.

    That’s how the pros do it, right?

    --

    FULL EPISODE TEXT

    Hey, my name’s Ted Fox, and I’m the host of With a Side of Knowledge, a podcast produced at the University of Notre Dame.

    We started out as the show that invited scholars, makers, and professionals to brunch for 30-minute, informal conversations about their work—until season 4, when the pandemic prompted us to record everything remotely. Now, with season 5, we’re excited to be able to bring back in-person interviews while still taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by our remote setup. Guests include members of the Notre Dame faculty, visitors who have come to campus to do anything from give a lecture or performance to participate in a fellowship program, and other interesting people we’ve plain cold-emailed and asked to come on the show.

    New episodes are released every other Thursday. Our website is withasideofpod.nd.edu, and you can find us on Twitter and Instagram. In both spots, we are @withasideofpod.

    Thank you for listening. Hopefully this will be the first of many times.

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

jpdomer99 ,

One of my favorites!

Love this podcast - I look forward to every episode! I love the range of topics covered and always learn something new!

Pfarrow ,

Can't wait to listen to every episode

I love listening to each episode and even listen to past episodes while waiting for the new one. I learn something new each time.

DomerScholar ,

Great higher ed podcast

Great source of higher ed commentary and insight into ND.

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