20 episodes

Who are some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts? What was their personal journey to success and what common themes helped them develop a vision for achievement? Women Vision SC podcasts will feature a different interview each Tuesday for 11 weeks, beginning April 30, 2019. Women Vision SC is an SCETV cross-platform initiative recognizing women of achievement from around the state on radio, television and online.

Women Vision SC Linda O'Bryon

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Who are some of South Carolina’s leading women in the fields of business, government, public service, and the arts? What was their personal journey to success and what common themes helped them develop a vision for achievement? Women Vision SC podcasts will feature a different interview each Tuesday for 11 weeks, beginning April 30, 2019. Women Vision SC is an SCETV cross-platform initiative recognizing women of achievement from around the state on radio, television and online.

    Women Vision SC: Tameika Isaac Devine

    Women Vision SC: Tameika Isaac Devine

    Tameika Isaac Devine was age 29 when she ran for office for the first time. She became the first African American female and the youngest person on the Columbia City Council. She recalls winning that election by less than 200 votes. “If those 200 people did not vote, I wouldn’t be here today.” Now some 18 years later, Tameika Isaac Devine continues in her 5th term on the Columbia City Council. She is the founding partner in her law firm, Jabber & Isaac, PA. She is also an author and public

    • 25 min
    Women Vision SC: Darla Moore

    Women Vision SC: Darla Moore

    When Darla Moore began business school at George Washington University, she said she “didn’t know what a balance sheet was.” After graduating with her MBA, she moved to New York City and began in banking. She became one of the nation’s most successful business leaders. She was the first woman on the cover of Fortune magazine and was listed as one of Fortune’s “50 Most Powerful Women in Business.” University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business was the first business school in the

    • 49 min
    Women Vision SC: Betty Jo Rhea

    Women Vision SC: Betty Jo Rhea

    Betty Jo Rhea served as Mayor of Rock Hill for 12 years and as a member of the City Council for 8 years. She was referred to as “the people’s mayor.” When she took over as mayor, unemployment stood at over 17% and textile mills had declined from 13 to only one. Under her leadership, the community started business parks and attracted several international companies to Rock Hill. She fostered a sports complex that has since paved the way for a city now known for being an amateur sports mecca. From

    • 17 min
    Women Vision SC: T. Lilly Little Water

    Women Vision SC: T. Lilly Little Water

    T. Lilly Little Water began her life's passion of advocating for Indigenous People at age seventeen. “It’s something intangible and inexplicable that drives me. It feels like there are also a 1000 ancestors in my heart that are constantly giving me a nudge in this way or that way. They always give me direction.” That direction has led T. Lilly Little Water to 30 years of conducting social justice campaigns for Native Americans. She is CEO of the SC Indian Affairs Commission, where she organized

    • 31 min
    Women Vision SC: M. Malissa Burnette

    Women Vision SC: M. Malissa Burnette

    Malissa Burnette is an award-winning attorney and advocate for equal rights for all. She is co-founder of the Burnette Shutt & McDaniel law firm in Columbia. She waged a legal battle to change the rules and allow women to attend The Citadel. She successfully challenged a rule that barred young girls from playing football. More recently, she and Nekki Shutt, another of the firm’s founding partners, were lead counsel in the case that made same-sex marriage legal in South Carolina. Since 1993,

    • 28 min
    Women Vision SC: Ann Timberlake

    Women Vision SC: Ann Timberlake

    Fresh out of Newcomb College at Tulane, Ann Timberlake came back to South Carolina and instead of taking up civil rights or the war, she said she “wanted to save trees.” She became one of South Carolina’s leading conservation advocates. As a founding member of the Sierra Club in South Carolina, she helped lead campaigns to establish the Congaree National Park and the Kilmer-Slickrock Wilderness. She also advocated for the Chattooga River as to be designated as a “Wild and Scenic River.” After

    • 19 min

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