17 episodes

This is a podcast about money for kids and their families from Marketplace, in collaboration with “Brains On!” Co-hosts Jed Kim and Bridget Bodnar answer the awkward, uncomfortable and sometimes surprising questions that kids have about money. Described as “a godsend for anyone who knows a little kid with big questions about money” by The New York Times, each episode tackles one big money idea, from how to negotiate to who invented money.

“Million Bazillion®” is made possible in part by The Ranzetta Family Charitable Fund and Next Gen Personal Finance, supporting Marketplace’s work to make younger audiences smarter about the economy. This podcast is presented by Greenlight, the debit card and investing app for kids and teens.

Million Bazillion American Public Media

    • Kids & Family

This is a podcast about money for kids and their families from Marketplace, in collaboration with “Brains On!” Co-hosts Jed Kim and Bridget Bodnar answer the awkward, uncomfortable and sometimes surprising questions that kids have about money. Described as “a godsend for anyone who knows a little kid with big questions about money” by The New York Times, each episode tackles one big money idea, from how to negotiate to who invented money.

“Million Bazillion®” is made possible in part by The Ranzetta Family Charitable Fund and Next Gen Personal Finance, supporting Marketplace’s work to make younger audiences smarter about the economy. This podcast is presented by Greenlight, the debit card and investing app for kids and teens.

    Why do prices end in $0.99?

    Why do prices end in $0.99?

    Ever notice how lots of prices at the store end in $0.99? So did Eli from Philadelphia, and he asked us to find out why. Turns out, it’s a method retailers use to get us to buy something — and it’s not their only one. This week, we’ll learn about how our brains work when we’re shopping, why it’s hard to resist a sale and some of the ways physical stores encourage us to spend a little more money. Let us know what you thought about this season and what you want Jed and Bridget to do next! You can reach us at Marketplace.org/million. 



    Read the transcript here.

    • 23 min
    Why are jobs so important?

    Why are jobs so important?

    Having a job is how we earn money to pay for the things we need. Money is important but it’s not the only reason people work. This week we’re going out to the pizzeria, where we’ll learn how every job is connected to lots of other jobs — and how those connections keep our economy running. Plus we’ll hear from a bunch of people with cool jobs that you probably didn’t even know existed, and we’ll ask a group of kids to tell us about the jobs of their dreams. Got a money problem you need help solving? Tell us about it at Marketplace.org/million.

    Read the transcript here.

    • 24 min
    What is the stock market?

    What is the stock market?

    Companies need money to grow, and there’s a way for them to get it: the stock market. They can sell a little piece of their company, called a share or stock, to regular people. If the company grows, those people get to keep some of the money it makes. Of course, there’s no guarantee that a company will grow — that’s what makes putting your money in the stock market risky. On this week’s episode, we’ll explain how it all works with the help of some Dutch spice traders, comfy sneakers, a bull … and a bear! Got a money problem? Tell us about it at Marketplace.org/million. 



    Read the transcript here.

    • 24 min
    Why is our money green?

    Why is our money green?

    This week we’re tracking down answers to a bunch of your questions about why money looks the way it does. A lot of you were curious about stuff like why American money is green, why other countries have more colorful currency, and who decides whose picture goes on each bill. We’ll get you all those answers — and more! Plus, we’ll meet a museum’s money curator, learn about the way money art protects us from fakes and think about how we’d design our own money … if anyone asked us.

    Read the transcript here.

    P.S. We want to hear your jokes about money. Click here to send us a voicemail!

    • 24 min
    Why can girls’ things cost more than boys’ things?

    Why can girls’ things cost more than boys’ things?

    One of our inquisitive listeners, Isabella, noticed when she was shopping online that women’s clothing was more expensive than men’s clothing — and she thought that was unfair. Turns out, it happens a lot.

    The same or really similar items, from school supplies to sports equipment, often cost more when they’re designed to look like they were made for girls. People have taken to calling this phenomenon the “pink tax.” This week, we’ll learn more about why it happens and what’s being done about it. We’ll also ask some random kids a not-so-random money question, and Bridget will introduce us to her new smart speaker — which has oddly great taste in music.

    Don’t forget: We want to hear from you about your money problems! Go to Marketplace.org/million for instructions on how to send us a voicemail.

    • 23 min
    The history of banks

    The history of banks

    When banks first started thousands of years ago, they were known as places to borrow money, not to keep your own money safe. Through loans, they’d provide funding to farmers or traders to help them with a project — like building a fence or traveling to another country. Borrowers often had to leave something valuable with the bank until they paid off the loan. To keep all that valuable stuff safe, banks became supersecure. That made them great places for everyday folks to deposit their money.

    This week, we’ll learn about the history of banks and how they work today and why they don’t work for all of us. Our old friend Bill Maurer will help us sort it all out, while Jed and Bridget see if they have what it takes to run their own bank.

    Read the transcript here.

    Don’t forget to send us your questions about money at Marketplace.org/million!

    • 22 min

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