45 min

16: The Joy of Learning in Every Era, with Dr. Kate Tilleczek The JOMOcast with Christina Crook

    • Philosophy

Canadian researcher Kate Tilleczek, Canada Research Chair on Youth, Education & Global Good, addresses the impact of online education on child development, during COVID-19 and beyond. Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, millions more children than ever are learning at home- and online. But the transition to increasingly digital and online environments for youth education was happening, and as usual, it happened with little pause to consider how much digital is a good thing, and how the personal and physical can find a balance with the remote and digital to best serve learning and well-being.  Dr. Tilleczek offers wise counsel to parents and educators everywhere: “With the pandemic, we really have a moment to reset, and see what makes the most sense for us as a society.”Key takeaways from this conversation:- How young people are processing their own immersion in digital channels of communication, socialization, and learning- How the social distancing-created explosion of remote learning has created an opportunity to observe the impact of the always-online life- The observed and measurable impact of globalized tech immersion in young people, including the decline of social skills and increased anxiety, isolation, and marginalization- How current research is exploring the rising self-awareness of the detrimental effects of tech overload across generations and finding solutions within that consciousness- The ways young people can, post- and mid-COVID, build balance and wellness into their digital-enabled livesSupportThis podcast is made possible by you — our listeners all over the world — from Brazil to Australia, the USA to Singapore. Please support the JOMO(cast) for just $3 a month. Sign up at patreon.com/jomocast. Thank you for supporting the content that supports you. Go Deeper Sign Up for 7 Days of JOMO Quests, a free series of science-backed challenges to reclaim joyexperiencejomo.com/free-resources  Follow @experiencejomo on Instagram, Facebook + Twitter ResourcesThe references and ideas mentioned in this episode: Learn, contribute, and participate with the Young Lives Research Laboratory at York UniversityRead Kate’s most recent book:  Youth in the Digital Age: Paradox, Promise, Predicament (Youth, Young Adulthood and Society)Follow Young Lives Research Laboratory on FacebookKate on  Research MinuteKate recommends: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power" by Shoshana ZuboffFavorite Quotes:“It says a lot to me about some of the limits that we’re reaching in technology when something so easy and simple [as handwritten letters to students] looks like a major breakthrough to people.”“Young people are suggesting to me that they want to reassess how technology is helping with… health, mental health, employment, environment, etc.”“With the pandemic, we really have a moment to reset, and see what makes the most sense for us as a society.”
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Canadian researcher Kate Tilleczek, Canada Research Chair on Youth, Education & Global Good, addresses the impact of online education on child development, during COVID-19 and beyond. Because of the COVID-19 epidemic, millions more children than ever are learning at home- and online. But the transition to increasingly digital and online environments for youth education was happening, and as usual, it happened with little pause to consider how much digital is a good thing, and how the personal and physical can find a balance with the remote and digital to best serve learning and well-being.  Dr. Tilleczek offers wise counsel to parents and educators everywhere: “With the pandemic, we really have a moment to reset, and see what makes the most sense for us as a society.”Key takeaways from this conversation:- How young people are processing their own immersion in digital channels of communication, socialization, and learning- How the social distancing-created explosion of remote learning has created an opportunity to observe the impact of the always-online life- The observed and measurable impact of globalized tech immersion in young people, including the decline of social skills and increased anxiety, isolation, and marginalization- How current research is exploring the rising self-awareness of the detrimental effects of tech overload across generations and finding solutions within that consciousness- The ways young people can, post- and mid-COVID, build balance and wellness into their digital-enabled livesSupportThis podcast is made possible by you — our listeners all over the world — from Brazil to Australia, the USA to Singapore. Please support the JOMO(cast) for just $3 a month. Sign up at patreon.com/jomocast. Thank you for supporting the content that supports you. Go Deeper Sign Up for 7 Days of JOMO Quests, a free series of science-backed challenges to reclaim joyexperiencejomo.com/free-resources  Follow @experiencejomo on Instagram, Facebook + Twitter ResourcesThe references and ideas mentioned in this episode: Learn, contribute, and participate with the Young Lives Research Laboratory at York UniversityRead Kate’s most recent book:  Youth in the Digital Age: Paradox, Promise, Predicament (Youth, Young Adulthood and Society)Follow Young Lives Research Laboratory on FacebookKate on  Research MinuteKate recommends: The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power" by Shoshana ZuboffFavorite Quotes:“It says a lot to me about some of the limits that we’re reaching in technology when something so easy and simple [as handwritten letters to students] looks like a major breakthrough to people.”“Young people are suggesting to me that they want to reassess how technology is helping with… health, mental health, employment, environment, etc.”“With the pandemic, we really have a moment to reset, and see what makes the most sense for us as a society.”
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

45 min