91 episodes

If time is tight, what's the one thing that you should be doing to improve your health and wellbeing? Michael Mosley reveals surprisingly simple top tips that are scientifically proven to change your life.

Just One Thing - with Michael Mosley BBC Podcasts

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 57 Ratings

Listen on Apple Podcasts
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If time is tight, what's the one thing that you should be doing to improve your health and wellbeing? Michael Mosley reveals surprisingly simple top tips that are scientifically proven to change your life.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Snack Smartly

    Snack Smartly

    We are a nation of snackers and we tend to get a whopping 25% of our daily calories from our snacks. But surprisingly, snacking isn’t necessarily bad for our health. Dr Sarah Berry at Kings College London explores a pragmatic approach to snacking, and tells Michael how what you snack on and when you snack has the greatest impact on your health. You don’t have to stop snacking - just snack smartly by swapping in some less-processed options. Our volunteer Denise, a hotel facilities manager from Liverpool, tries to reap the benefits of better snacks.

    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    Track Your Exercise

    Track Your Exercise

    Tracking your exercise is a simple and surprisingly effective way to motivate you to move more. Most of us own an exercise tracker, whether it’s the fitness app on our phone or a special bit of kit on our wrist. But how do they make us more active? Professor Carol Maher, from the University of Southern Australia, has found wearing an activity tracker really can encourage more physical activity. She tells Michael how the instant feedback allows people to take control of their activity levels. Michael learns the extra movement a tracker encourages can really help improve your brain power and reduce your risk of certain cancers and type 2 diabetes. Volunteer Rumbi opens her fitness app and steps out to see if it really works.
    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    • 14 min
    Get an Early Night

    Get an Early Night

    Michael discovers his long-time penchant for an early night could have some real health benefits. If you are someone who could go to sleep earlier and simply put it off with an extra episode or phone scrolling, Michael recommends going to bed an hour earlier than normal because getting enough sleep deeply impacts your brain, protecting against depression and other neurological problems. Professor Esra Tasali at the University of Chicago's Sleep Centre, shares her research that sleeping an extra hour a night has been found to have an incredible effect on our appetite, reducing cravings often linked to weight gain. Our volunteer Dylan, who is very health and exercise conscious, is surprised to find a little more sleep every night could benefit his fitness routine.
    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    • 13 min
    Eat Whole Grains

    Eat Whole Grains

    Michael discovers incorporating wholegrains into our diet, is a tasty swap that could really benefit our health. Wholegrains such as wholegrain pasta, bread and brown rice contain more fibre, vitamins and minerals, than refined grains. This simple swap can help reduce blood pressure, improve heart health and boost the gut microbiome. Michael talks to Dr Caleigh Sawicki, from the Brigham and Women’s hospital and Harvard Medical School, whose research suggests that the fibre consumption of wholegrains can keep us fuller for longer and this slow digestion could result in a lower increase in blood sugar.
    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    • 14 min
    Do a Plank

    Do a Plank

    Michael adds a plank into his exercise routine and is surprised to learn of its huge benefits to our physical health.
    Dr Jamie O'Driscoll, a Reader of Cardiovascular Physiology at Canterbury Christ Church University, reveals how the plank is a form of isometric exercise, where muscles are held still, neither stretching nor contracting. Jamie shares his research that found these exercises, including the plank and the wall-squat, could massively reduce our blood pressure.
    Michael also explores how the plank can even be better than crunches or sit ups for your abs and core muscles. Our volunteer Penelope takes on the plank, excited to learn that this small addition to her fitness regime could yield great results.
    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    • 14 min
    Drink Green Tea

    Drink Green Tea

    Michael takes a break to brew up a cup of green tea, warming up to its distinctive taste and its health benefits. Dr Edward Okello, from the Human Nutrition Research Centre at the University of Newcastle, reveals how green tea can benefit our brain power and health. Green tea contains the polyphenol EGCG (Epigallocatechin Gallate) and Professor Okello explains how this polyphenol inhibits a destructive enzyme which harms our brain cells. Michael also learns that a nice hot cup of green tea also induces calming brain waves, improves heart health and could even help delay dementia. Meanwhile, volunteer Jacqui enjoys the benefits of going green.
    Series Producer: Nija Dalal-Small
    Science Producer: Catherine Wyler
    Researcher: Sophie Richardson
    Researcher: Will Hornbrook
    Production Manager: Maria Simons
    Editor: Zoe Heron
    A BBC Studios production for BBC Sounds / BBC Radio 4.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
57 Ratings

57 Ratings

Afterweeks ,

Interesting, fun tips for staying healthy backed by research

I always enjoyed “Trust Me I’m a Doctor” on BBC which was hosted by Dr Mosley and a band of Drs who looked at various health fads to see whether there was anything credible to them. This podcast is like their greatest hits. Dr M’ introduces a topic e.g standing on 1 leg to exercise your balance (which I had never thought of) then talks to a leading researcher on the topic to help back up the credibility of the topic. All in under 15 minutes! I love the format, finding it unpatronizing and easy to understand.

Long May it continue! Thank you.

@yourprettyplace ,

Love all these tips!

I love that I don’t need to make dramatic changes to go about improving myself. Such a witty and engaging show! Love from Canada!

Carrie Lisa ,

Inspiring!

I love these nuggets of information that encourage me to improve my health through simple tweaks to my daily routine! Highly recommended!

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