15 episodes

True Crime Psychology and Personality, hosted by Dr. Todd Grande, dives deep into the pathology behind some of the most horrendous crimes and those who commit them. We discuss topics like narcissism, psychopathy, sociopathy, and antisocial personality disorder from a scientifically informed perspective. What is a narcissist? What makes a person develop narcissistic personality disorder or become a psychopath? How do you spot a sociopath? What signs can you look for to protect yourself from these dangerous personalities? It's not just about the stories, it's about the science and psychology behind them.

True Crime Psychology and Personality: Narcissism, Psychopathy, and the Minds of Dangerous Criminals Ars Longa Media

    • True Crime

True Crime Psychology and Personality, hosted by Dr. Todd Grande, dives deep into the pathology behind some of the most horrendous crimes and those who commit them. We discuss topics like narcissism, psychopathy, sociopathy, and antisocial personality disorder from a scientifically informed perspective. What is a narcissist? What makes a person develop narcissistic personality disorder or become a psychopath? How do you spot a sociopath? What signs can you look for to protect yourself from these dangerous personalities? It's not just about the stories, it's about the science and psychology behind them.

    FEMALE KILLERS: Nannie Doss, the Giggling Grandma

    FEMALE KILLERS: Nannie Doss, the Giggling Grandma

    This podcast examines the construct of female serial killers' behavior versus what we would expect with male serial killers. In particular, we focus on the female serial killer named Nannie Doss, otherwise known as “the giggling grandma”.When it comes to female serial killers, one of the weird things is that for a long time a lot of people didn't even believe that women were capable of serial murder. A lot of the early definitions of the term serial killer were limited to murders that involved a sexual component, but the crimes of female serial killers rarely involve a sexual component. Some experts have argued that there's no such thing as a female serial killer. We see that 98% of female serial killers are white, and they start at around age 31 to 38. They tend to kill female and male victims with about equal frequency. The average number of victims of female serial killers is about 6 and the average victim age is around age 48. In terms of targeting, we see that 30% of female serial killers killed both and children, 45% killed only adults, and 25% killed only children. We also see that female serial killers generally murder within their local area. Female serial killers tend to kill victims by poisoning, suffocation, and staged accidents.More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media CitationsHarrison, M. A., Murphy, E. A., Ho, L. Y., Bowers, T. G., & Flaherty, C. V. (2015). Female serial killers in the United States: means, motives, and makings. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology, 26(3), 383–406.Harrison, M. A., Hughes, S. M., & Gott, A. J. (2019). Sex differences in serial killers. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences.Frei, A., Völlm, B., Graf, M., & Dittmann, V. (2006). Female serial killing: review and case report. Criminal Behaviour & Mental Health, 16(3), 167–176.

    • 14 min
    FEMALE KILLERS: Gypsy Rose Blanchard and Munchausen by Proxy

    FEMALE KILLERS: Gypsy Rose Blanchard and Munchausen by Proxy

    This episode examines the Gypsy Rose Blanchard case, as well as questions like was her sentence fair? Should she be released early? What was the role of Münchausen Syndrome by Proxy (Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another)? In 2016, Gypsy Rose Blanchard was convicted of second-degree murder for the 2015 murder of her mother, Dee Dee Blanchard. In 2018, Gypsy Rose Blanchard’s conspirator, Nicholas Godejohn, was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole. The case has attracted attention because it has been alleged that Dee Dee Blanchard had symptoms of Münchausen Syndrome by Proxy and abused Gypsy Rose Blanchard for years. Münchausen Syndrome by Proxy is a rare disorder where a perpetrator, usually the parent or other caregiver, intentionally induces, falsifies, or exaggerates manifestations of physical or mental health symptoms in another person under his/her care and in which no obvious external incentives (e.g., financial gain) are involved.More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media Citations Sokmensuer, H. (2017). A Daughter Trapped, a Mother Murdered Fatal Family Secrets. People, 87(22), 64. https://www.ksdk.com/article/news/cri...https://www.news-leader.com/story/new...https://www.biography.com/news/gypsy-...https://www.change.org/p/missouri-gov...

    • 19 min
    CASE: Harold Fish Murder Case and the Dark Triad

    CASE: Harold Fish Murder Case and the Dark Triad

    This episode looks at the mental health and personality aspects in the Harold Fish murder case. What dark triad traits do we see in this case? The Harold Fish murder case was an unusual self-defense situation that turned into a second-degree murder conviction. There has been speculation about how the dark triad traits may have influenced the outcome of this case. More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media Citationshttps://caselaw.findlaw.com/az-court-... http://www.nbcnews.com/id/15199221/ns... http://www.haroldfishdefense.org/welc...

    • 17 min
    DARK TRIAD: Sexual Fantasies and Subtle Signs

    DARK TRIAD: Sexual Fantasies and Subtle Signs

    This episode discusses the dark triad of personality which includes psychopathy, narcissism, and machiavellianism. Particular attention is made to types of sexual fantasies in general and specifically fantasies amongst those with "dark personalities." The first sexual fantasy is “intimate.” This is the most common fantasy. Here we see a sense of attachment and familiarity. This is when somebody wants to connect with a sexual partner at the emotional level. The next sexual fantasy is referred to as “exploratory.” Here we see a commission of diverse acts, like mate swapping or promiscuity. The third one is the “impersonal” fantasy. Here we see characteristics like being emotionally detached and disinterested, for example, fetishism. The last sexual fantasy theme is the "sadomasochistic" fantasy. Here we see causing or submitting to physical or emotional abuse. We also discuss some subtle signs associated with the dark triad.  When we think of the dark triad, we think of narcissism as the ‘lightest trait’ and psychopathy as the ‘darkest trait.’ These different traits have characteristics in common like empathy deficits, selfishness, a short-term mating style, as well as being competitive, antisocial, hedonistic, and having antagonism.  Narcissism in the dark triad is really grandiose narcissism. We see characteristics like arrogance, being socially dominant, being self-centered, a sense of entitlement, and a tendency to manipulate others (we see this characteristic with all three of the dark triad traits). Psychopathy characteristics include callousness; a lack of empathy, remorse, or guilt; violating society's norms; being irresponsible; being impulsive; having shallow effect; and superficial charm. The trait of Machiavellianism includes antisocial behaviors, but they're usually conceptualized as white-collar crime. We also see cynicism, having good impulse control (so this would differentiate Machiavellianism from psychopathy), callousness and being goal-oriented (usually we conceptualize the goal as being negative).Timestamps:00:30 - Dark triad and sexual fantasies09:40 - Subtle signsMore Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media CitationsBaughman, H. M., Jonason, P. K., Veselka, L., & Vernon, P. A. (2014). Four shades of sexual fantasies linked to the Dark Triad. Personality and Individual Differences, 67, 47–51.

    • 31 min
    Valentine's Day Special: The Chris Watts and Nichol Kessinger Affair

    Valentine's Day Special: The Chris Watts and Nichol Kessinger Affair

    This episode discusses how did the dynamics of the Chris Watts-Nichol Kessinger affair contributed to the Watts family murders. The dynamics in this affair appear to be a critical factor in this case. One theory of the dynamics is that Chris Watts was introverted and insecure and Nichol Kessinger was confident, extraverted, and experienced in romantic relationships. This may have led to a power differential that unintentionally contribute to the horrific murders. This episode also reviews the role that immaturity, the passionate stage of romance, and impulsivity may have had in this case. More Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media CitationsWestfall, S. S., Frederick, S. H. I., Baker, K., Boudin, M., & Truesdell, J. (2018). The Watts Family Murders SECRETS & LIES. People, 90(12), 52.Westfall, S. S., Baker, K. c., & Helling, S. (2018). The Watts Family Murders A MONSTER’S DOUBLE LIFE. People, 90(25), 63.

    • 18 min
    DARK TRIAD: Narcissism, Psychopathy, and Machiavellianism (plus Spotting Dark Triad Traits)

    DARK TRIAD: Narcissism, Psychopathy, and Machiavellianism (plus Spotting Dark Triad Traits)

    What is the dark triad? There are three specific personality traits: narcissism, psychopathy, and a trait referred to as Machiavellianism. All three of these traits share a personality trait called antagonism. Narcissism, as it relates to the dark triad, has two different types: grandiose and vulnerable. With grandiose narcissism, we see traits like being dominant, arrogant, exploiting other people, and exhibitionism. With vulnerable narcissism, we see characteristics like being shy, distrusting other people, having mood lability, and being self-critical. Most of the research on the dark triad is really referring to grandiose narcissism and not vulnerable narcissism. With psychopathy, we see characteristics like violating social norms, being callous, having a lack of empathy, being impulsive, irresponsible, having superficial charm, being manipulative, and having shallow effect. When we look at the research that studies psychopathy related to the dark triad, we're really talking about a continuum where there can be subclinical psychopathy all the way up to clinical psychopathy. The last trait in the dark triad is Machiavellianism. We don't really see this mentioned in the clinical literature very much. This is really something we see more in literature related to careers. With Machiavellianism, we see characteristics like being manipulative, callous, being goal-oriented, having a satisfactory to a good level of impulse control, and tending to be related to white-collar crime or at least white-collar antisocial behavior. An important point with Machiavellianism is that there's no clinical impairment here with this particular trait. What is the difference between the dark traits and the vulnerable dark traits? The dark traits and the vulnerable dark traits are traits that are connected to criminality and, in theory, they are differentially connected to criminality. The dark traits predict certain types of criminal activities and the vulnerable dark traits predict other types of criminal activities. The topic of dark traits and vulnerable dark traits is a little confusing because of the term triad. A lot of times we hear this we hear the “dark triad” and the “vulnerable dark triad,” but just like the traits, there's no single agreed upon definition for the dark triad or vulnerable dark triad. One popular definition of the dark triad would be that there's three traits: psychopathy, narcissism, and machiavellianism. This particular theory, to some extent, has fallen out of favor because machiavellianism doesn't appear to be a distinct construct. I talked about this in a prior video about the dark triad. Another conceptualization has interpersonal and affective psychopathic traits along with grandiose narcissism. The vulnerable dark triad comprises lifestyle psychopathic traits, vulnerable narcissism, and borderline personality traits. 00:30 - What is the dark triad?07:38 - Dark traits vs vulnerable traits15:20 - Spotting the dark triad in facesMore Content on Narcissism, Psychopathy, Sociopathy and Antisocial Personality DisorderFor even more, scientifically informed content on psychology and personality check out Dr. Grande's YouTube channelArs Longa MediaTo learn more about or to support Ars Longa Media and this podcast, go to arslonga.media. We welcome your feedback at info@arslonga.media CitationsVize, C. E., Lynam, D. R., Collison, K. L., & Miller, J. D. (2018). Differences among dark triad components: A meta-analytic investigation. Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 9(2), 101-111. doi:10.1037/per0000222Holtzman, Nicholas S. (2011). Facing a Psychopath: Detecting the Dark Triad from Emotionally-Neutral Faces, Using Prototypes From the Personality Faceaurus. Journal of Research in Personality. 45, 648-654. Giacomin, M., & Rule, N. O. (2018). Eyebrows cue grandiose narcissism. Journal of Persona

    • 25 min

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