46 episodes

"What About Water" connects water science with the stories that bring about solutions, adaptations & actions for the world's water realities. Hosted by Jay Famiglietti and presented by the Global Institute for Water Security and The Walrus Lab. Formerly known as "Let's Talk About Water".

What About Water? with Jay Famiglietti Global Institute for Water Security

    • Science
    • 4.8 • 16 Ratings

"What About Water" connects water science with the stories that bring about solutions, adaptations & actions for the world's water realities. Hosted by Jay Famiglietti and presented by the Global Institute for Water Security and The Walrus Lab. Formerly known as "Let's Talk About Water".

    At Its Essence: What Indigenous Teachings Tell us About Water

    At Its Essence: What Indigenous Teachings Tell us About Water

    In our first mini-episode of the summer season, we turn to three guests from our past seasons to explore Indigenous ways of knowing, and to look more closely at the sacred nature of water -- how various people understand it, conserve it and co-exist with it.
     
    Janet Pitsiulaaq Brewster shares how climate change is affecting Indigenous reconciliation efforts in Canada and what melting permafrost means for the Inuit of Iqaluit.
     
    Deon Hassler gives hope to a new generation of Indigenous water operators in the face of long-term boil water advisories.
    And Josée Street shares her story of learning the lessons of western science, while the teachings of her family and culture bubble under the surface.  
    We'd also like to hear your thoughts, in our What About Water Listener Survey. As a thank you, we will plant a tree through One Tree Planted for each survey our podcast listeners complete. 

    • 14 min
    Summer Season Trailer

    Summer Season Trailer

    This summer on What About Water? we bring you some of our most compelling interviews from the past three seasons. We're releasing four mini episodes spanning four different themes that continue to resonate in the world of water. 

    This special summer edition of What About Water? launches May 18, with one episode dropping each month. 

    • 1 min
    The Girl Who Wanted To Swim: Tackling Sewage At The Source

    The Girl Who Wanted To Swim: Tackling Sewage At The Source

    On our final episode of Season 3, we hear how a 6th grade science fair project led to receiving the Order of Nova Scotia for youth environmentalist and clean water advocate, Stella Bowles. At just 11 years old, Stella learned about the 600 straight pipes flushing unprocessed sewage from homes directly into the LaHave river behind her home. What started as a science fair project catapulted her community - and all three levels of government - into action to clean up the LaHave. Now 18 years old and $15.7 million in government funds allocated later, Stella sits down with Jay to share her story.

    On the Last Word we hear from more youth of all ages – five-year old Rishi, 8-year-old Aashrith, 10-year-old Aurelia, 12-year-old Tasman, and 13-year-old Shreya. They share why water is important to them and what they are doing to protect it, plus a call to action for adults everywhere. 

    Read the full guest bio for Stella Bowles here.

    • 26 min
    Water Pipes to Water Rights: Protecting Water with Newsha Ajami and Carolina Vilches

    Water Pipes to Water Rights: Protecting Water with Newsha Ajami and Carolina Vilches

    This week on What About Water?, we look at water infrastructure – from broken water pipes across America to the redistribution of water rights in Chilé – and what role governments play in fixing the systems that distribute our water. Newsha Ajami, Chief Development Officer for Research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, joins us as our first return guest of the podcast.
    Newsha and Jay cover the state of America’s aging water systems and innovative solutions at play from 50L Homes to on-site water reuse projects, changing views on grassy lawns, and investment in data systems as water infrastructure for the 21st century.
    On the Last Word we hear from Carolina Vilches, a member of the constitutional convention in Chilé, where large industries hold huge rights to water. She was elected last May to help re-write her country’s constitution and recalibrate water distribution. Under Chilé’s new laws, she’s trying to make sure water gets official protection as a basic human right.
    Read the guest bios for Newsha Ajami and Carolina Vilches here. 

    • 29 min
    Good To The Last Drop? Coffee & Climate with Aaron Davis

    Good To The Last Drop? Coffee & Climate with Aaron Davis

    Coffee is one of the most widely-consumed beverages in the world. But with climate change threatening the world's two main coffee species, will that change? Coffee scientist and researcher Dr. Aaron Davis says even with rising temperatures, and more drought -- that doesn’t have to be the case. This week on What About Water? we hear why reintroducing forgotten wild coffee species will be the key to growing enough coffee in the future.
    In this episode, Jay learns about the professional coffee-tasting process and just how much flavor factors into the equation for coffee farmers’ bottom lines.

    On the Last Word we meet Daniel Sarmu, a coffee development specialist in Sierra Leone who is helping small farmers grow heat-tolerant Stenophylla coffee. He is also searching for more Stenophylla coffee trees in the wild.


    Aaron Davis

    Dr. Aaron Davis is the Senior Research Leader of Plant Resources at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (UK). Davis is the leading authority on coffee species and has traveled widely to countries in Africa to study coffee in the wild. His team at Kew is dedicated to the identification and understanding of the beneficial traits of crops and associated organisms, particularly within the context of environmental stress resilience and climate change.

    Davis’ work on coffee spans over 30 years, and includes the naming and classification of coffee species, molecular (DNA) studies, conservation, climate change and resilience, and sustainable development. More recently he has published research on the value of wild coffee species (and diversity) for the sustainability of the global coffee sector. Ongoing and new work includes the development of climate resilience methods and the use of wild coffee species for the development of next-generation coffee crops.

    Daniel Sarmu

    Daniel Sarmu is a Coffee Development Specialist from Kenema, Sierra Leone. He has worked in the development world for over 20 years, primarily in agriculture, helping small farmers maximize their profits in the coffee industry. In 2018, Daniel re-discovered the long-forgotten Stenophylla coffee plant in the hills of Sierra Leone alongside Dr. Jeremy Hagar and Aaron Davis. In recent years, Daniel has also written Sierra Leone’s coffee policy and is putting finishing touches on it so that small farmers across the country can use it.

    • 29 min
    Tasha Beeds: Walking With Water

    Tasha Beeds: Walking With Water

    On this episode of What About Water? we’re learning from traditional knowledge.   Jay sits down with Tasha Beeds, a grassroots Indigenous academic and Water Walker.
     
    She takes us through the origins of Water Walking - an Indigenous ceremony recognizing and connecting with water. Beeds enters into ceremony for the water - discussing what it means to raise consciousness about water as a living entity.
     
    On the Last Word, we hear from Josée Street, a young Indigenous woman who shows how scientists can bridge the gap between traditional ways of knowing and western thinking.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

PrairieEarth ,

Interesting, fun, and relevant - Subscribed!

Just what I’ve been looking for - a fun podcast that keeps me informed of the most pressing issues of water and sustainability today, all in a format that fits into my morning routine.

The issues and guests featured on the show have all been interesting so far, with broad appeal whether from the perspective of an informed citizen or as someone interested in science and hydrology. The host keeps the discussion moving, with just enough humour to keep the discussion lively while staying on point.

This podcast always leaves me with something interesting to think about - definitely worth following.

Sleepless Grad Student ,

Give me more!!

The perfect balance of entertaining and informative!! Love the "future jay” bits!

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