80 Folgen

The yesterday and today podcast is a fan-made, not for profit, just for fun compilation of chronological source materials as they pertain to the Beatles. This show is in no way affiliated with Apple Corps, nor any organization connected to John, Paul, George or Ringo in any way... though we do consider ourselves premiere members of the Bungalow Bill fun club. So kick back, turn off your mind, relax and download the stream...we hope you will enjoy the show.

Yesterday and Today Wayne Kaminski

    • Musik

The yesterday and today podcast is a fan-made, not for profit, just for fun compilation of chronological source materials as they pertain to the Beatles. This show is in no way affiliated with Apple Corps, nor any organization connected to John, Paul, George or Ringo in any way... though we do consider ourselves premiere members of the Bungalow Bill fun club. So kick back, turn off your mind, relax and download the stream...we hope you will enjoy the show.

    Beatles ’74 pt5

    Beatles ’74 pt5

    As the summer of '74 winds to a close, work on John Lennon's new album is in the final stages of completion. One last magic touch would make its way to this new record in the form of Lennon's friend Elton John, who lent his talents to several tracks including the song Elton felt was destined to be a hit: the boogie-woogie pop gem Whatever Gets You Through The Night. So convinced was Elton, that the pianist superstar bet John the song would be a #1 record, and if it achieved that milestone, the former Beatle must join Elton and the band on stage to perform it. The unconvinced Lennon took the bet, and turned his attention to another collaborative project: the release of the long-awaited Pussycats album by pal Harry Nilsson, which John produced during the pair's notorious "lost weekend". Such a burst of musical productivity wasn't limited to John -- Paul McCartney and his band Wings were back from their extended stay in Nashville and shooting a new documentary called One Hand Clapping. The film (and planned "live" studio album of the same name) were meant to chronicle the new Wings lineup as the group tightened-up for what would assuredly be a new long stint of touring. Sadly, both the film and the planned album would be shelved as the band entered yet another transformative phase...

    • 1 Std. 27 Min.
    Beatles ’74 pt4

    Beatles ’74 pt4

    It's a time of challenges and changes for the four former Beatles in the summer of 1974, with some lives on the rise, some on the mend, and some hitting rock bottom. With his new label Dark Horse Records, George Harrison sought to turn the creative page in a positive direction from the ashes of the Beatles' split, but what should have been a happy time for the launch of this new endeavor soon turned to bitter sadness. After many months of substance abuse and unabashed infidelity, George's marriage to Pattie Boyd was in ruins, and Pattie sought refuge with the man who had fallen in love with her in that time: George's good friend Eric Clapton. Wasting no time, George continued headlong into his latest album project, though the same sorrows and substance abuses that had haunted Harrison throughout the decline of his marriage would remain intact and begin to take a physical toll on the former Beatle. John Lennon, meanwhile, was busy finding a new creative voice outside of his own crumbling marriage to Yoko Ono - only without the excesses that had plagued his life earlier in the year. No, John was in a good place - enjoying his new relationship with girlfriend May Pang and knee-deep in the development of a joyous, spirited follow-up to 1973's Mind Games LP. Paul McCartney and his newly #1 band Wings were hard at work on sessions of their own, wrapping up their summer-long stay in Tennessee with an eye toward their next destination...

    • 1 Std. 19 Min.
    Beatles ’74 pt3

    Beatles ’74 pt3

    It's June of 1974 and Paul McCartney's Band on the Run is back at the #1 spot yet again - rocketed to the top of the Billboard Top 200 in America with each new single. While Paul credits much of the album's success to the instincts of Capitol executive Al Coury, it seemed Al's advice was equally valuable to another former Beatle at this time. Coury's next big win? Finally securing the missing tapes from John Lennon's Oldies But Moldies record from Phil Spector - recorded during John's so-called "lost weekend" in Los Angeles. With the Oldies tapes in hand and a renewed creative zeal, Lennon decided to return to the studio to write and record a collection of all-new material as his next big album project. Capitol's input was working out well for Lennon and McCartney, but George Harrison's disagreements with CEO Bhaskar Menon in recent years would finally drive the ex-Beatle to form his very own label: Dark Horse Records. Dark Horse, distributed by A&M, was George's chance to flex creative muscle with distance from the now-embattled Allen Klein and the increasingly defunct Apple Records. The former Beatles were on a hot streak of hits, and making big creative moves with an eye toward the end of their EMI commitments in the months to come...

    • 1 Std. 20 Min.
    Beatles ’74 pt2

    Beatles ’74 pt2

    With Allen Klein out of the picture and John Lennon living a bachelor lifestyle independent from Yoko Ono for the first time in nearly five years, it seemed the circumstances were at last right for the musical reunion many thought to be impossible: Lennon and McCartney together again in the studio. These loose, drug and drink-fueled jam sessions from March of 1974 (affectionately dubbed "a toot and a snore in '74" by fans, years later) were hardly a masterwork of new material...still, John and Paul were making music together and thereby keeping the hope of a Beatles reformation alive. Lennon's crew of so-called "Hollywood Vampires" present at the Santa Monica beach home for this momentous occasion included Keith Moon, Stevie Wonder, Ringo Starr and the affable Harry Nilsson who, due to the excesses in his personal life, found himself suffering from debilitating throat problems. In fact, the Lennon-produced sessions for Harry's upcoming Pussy Cats album were nearly derailed by his ailments - and John found himself in the position to take charge of his rowdy comrades much like he had done for the Beatles themselves over a decade prior. But while John was straightening out, his fellow former bandmates George and Ringo spiraled further into times that could only be referred to as "simply shady"...

    • 1 Std. 15 Min.
    Beatles ’74 pt1

    Beatles ’74 pt1

    It's 1974 and the coming year would once again bring new music from all four former Beatles -- along with a mix of drama and triumph in the personal lives of John, Paul, George and Ringo. The new year saw Paul McCartney riding high with his hit album Band on the Run and corresponding single Helen Wheels. This strong collection of tracks from Paul, Linda and Denny would peak and the #1 spot, before dropping from that position and rising once again to #1 through the efforts of Capitol Records executive Al Coury. Al's recommendations to Paul included rereleasing Band on the Run with Helen Wheels included on the album, as well as encouraging the release of Jet as a single in the early weeks of '74. Al's efforts paid off, and McCartney's Wings were set on their course to the top of the pop world in the months and years to come. While Macca found himself at the top, former partner John Lennon found himself in the gutter, literally, with a series of mishaps in LA alongside fellow "hollywood vampires" Harry Nilsson, Alice Cooper, Keith Moon, Ringo Starr and Micky Dolenz (to name but a few of these wild and craaazy guys). One particularly disastrous night from John's famed "lost weekend" saw him and pal Harry ejected from the Smothers Brothers reunion concert at the Troubadour - leading Lennon to rethink his hard-partying ways. In fact, Lennon was rethinking a lot of things, including a new musical collaboration with none other than Paul McCartney...

    • 1 Std. 23 Min.
    Beatles ’73 pt10

    Beatles ’73 pt10

    With Paul McCartney's new LP Band on the Run, the former Beatle with so much to prove at last redefined his talents for not only skeptical Beatle fans, but a whole new generation of listeners ready for the Wings sound. While many hailed the masterpiece as a concept album, McCartney & co were themselves unaware of any concept hidden in the record, though Wings by definition were in fact a Band on the Run in the years prior to the album and therefore could inhabit the role of those eponymous "rabbits on the run". From the Denny Laine-penned No Words, to the Ginger Baker-backed Mamunia, to the the downright danceable Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five, this Wings album would become arguably the biggest of McCartney's entire career beginning in the Christmas season of 1973 and continuing on into 1974 to become a cultural phenomenon. While Paul was riding high, John Lennon continued his drug and drink fueled "lost weekend" in Los Angeles - separated from Yoko and acting out in unruly, and sometimes violent ways. Beyond his own personal struggles, producer Phil Spector seemingly skipped town with Lennon's "Oldies But Moldies" tapes, holding the recordings hostage for no ransom beyond his own personal madness. 1973 was one of the most prolific periods in the lives of the former Beatles, and it would not go out without a BANG (literally)...

    • 1 Std. 17 Min.

Top‑Podcasts in Musik

Zuhörer haben auch Folgendes abonniert: