165 episodes

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Week in Ar‪t‬ The Art Newspaper Podcasts

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.7 • 88 Ratings

From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. Hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    WTF are NFTs? Why crypto is dominating the art market

    WTF are NFTs? Why crypto is dominating the art market

    This week: NFTs or Non-Fungible Tokens. What are they? Are they a fad or do they represent the future of the art market? We talk to two people in the world of crypto commodities about the explosion of NFTs on the art market. We hear from the artist Beeple, whose piece Everydays: The First 5000 Days is the first standalone NFT work of art to be sold at auction, and to Jason Bailey, the founder of the analytical database artnome. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Doug Aitken talks about the minimalist composer Terry Riley’s 1968 piece You’re No Good.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    'Black grief and white grievance' at New York’s New Museum

    'Black grief and white grievance' at New York’s New Museum

    This week: the curator Naomi Beckwith and artist Okwui Okpokwasili discuss Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America, a major show at the New Museum in New York—the final project conceived by the late curator Okwui Enwezor. Also, we explore the effect of Covid-19 on artists with disabilities: we talk to the artist Cara Macwilliam and to Hannah Whitlock and Laura Miles from the UK charity Outside In. And Goya’s Graphic Imagination has opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, so for this episode’s Work of the Week we talk to Goya specialist Francisco Chaparro, who contributed to the exhibition’s catalogue, about one of the prints in his series The Disasters of War (1810-15), One can’t look (No se puede mirar).
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Stonehenge: could a road tunnel ruin the ancient site?

    Stonehenge: could a road tunnel ruin the ancient site?

    This week: excavations have revealed new archaeological finds at Stonehenge but the UK government has approved a road tunnel through this iconic World Heritage Site—will it ruin it? We talk to Mike Pitts, an archaeologist, about the debate over the tunnel and its effect on the ancient stones and their surrounding landscape. Plus: museums in France are urging their government to let them reopen; we talk to Jean-François Chougnet of Mucem, a museum in Marseille. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson speaks to the artist Crystal Fischetti about Wish List, a sculptural installation by Karla Black.
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr
    The fight against Putin: artists on the frontline

    The fight against Putin: artists on the frontline

    On this week's podcast: the artist-activists at the heart of Russia’s biggest protests in a decade and how the Indian government is using heritage and museums to re-write the history of the country. We talk to Lölja Nordic, an artist, DJ and activist in Saint Petersburg, who appeared in a video released this week by Pussy Riot, Russia’s most famous cultural activists, in support of "political prisoners" arrested in the protests across Russia. And we talk to the academic Sarover Zaidi about the Indian government's approach to the country's heritage. In this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Navid Nuur talks about Walter De Maria’s New York Earth Room (1977).
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Botticelli and Leonardo: the new normal for Old Masters

    Botticelli and Leonardo: the new normal for Old Masters

    This week, the Old Masters in the digital age. We look at the $92m live-streamed auction sale (with fees) of a major Botticelli in New York and new research, including a study using artificial intelligence, into Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi.
    While a prize Botticelli sold for a record price for the early Renaissance master at Sotheby's, a Rembrandt, expected to fetch $20m-$30m, was withdrawn from the auction at the last minute. So as the coronavirus crisis continues, is this really a good moment to sell Old Masters? Scott Reyburn, who writes for The Art Newspaper and the New York Times, reflects on the results of the sale and the Old Masters market more generally.
    Then, Alison Cole, the editor of The Art Newspaper, explains the latest scientific findings about Salvator Mundi, the Leonardo painting that sold at Christie’s in 2017 for $450m—including a study using neural networks.
    And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Gerard Byrne talks about a diorama in the Biological Museum, in Stockholm, which inspired Byrne’s series of photographs, Beasts, and a film installation, Film Inside an Image, both now showing in an online viewing room at kerlingallery.com.


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 53 min
    What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

    What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?

    This week: as Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are sworn in as the president and vice president of the United States, what might their administration do for the visual arts? We talk to Jori Finkel, a regular contributor to The Art Newspaper and The New York Times from Los Angeles. We explore an extraordinary story linking QAnon, the far-right conspiracy theory and hate group, and how its origins may lie in the activities of a collective of radical Italian artists in the 1990s, the Luther Blisset Project, with Eddy Frankel, the Culture editor of Time Out and founder of the art and football magazine OOF. And in this week’s Work of the Week, we actually look at 20 works: Alphonse Mucha’s Slav Epic, with Mucha’s grandson, John.


    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
88 Ratings

88 Ratings

hilla1 ,

Superb

This show is interesting, informative, educational, entertaining and much more. Looking forward to each new episode. Keep up the good work!

Recidivist2018 ,

Excellent

Terrific podcast, excellent themes well explored by an astute presenter.

Soapsoane ,

I love this podcast: Ben’s Enthusiasm for art and artists is rich and informative

This is a great podcast: reminds me of the depth that Julia Hobsbawm’s podcast Editorial Intelligence reached: this paper and podcast is changing the way we think about news and art: in fact; News As Art!
Thanks!
Paula

Top Podcasts In Visual Arts

Listeners Also Subscribed To