14 集

 Dior Talks is an ongoing series of compelling podcasts that explore the House’s position at the intersection of art, culture and society. Featuring a rotating lineup of specialized hosts, each series examines a particular theme, with topics as varying as feminist art, styling and the environment, as well as informative discussions on the heritage of the House itself. Both Maria Grazia Chiuri and Kim Jones, since their respective arrivals, have produced collections that ask big questions, and both have been notable for their regular collaborations with a broad and sometimes surprising spectrum of artists, performers, writers and intellectuals. 
Dior Talks continues this level of interactive dialogue with a diverse range of guests who, through informal but informative conversations, open up about their areas of expertise and discuss their careers while delving as well as their interactions with the house of Dior.  

DIOR TALKS DIOR

    • 時尚與美容

 Dior Talks is an ongoing series of compelling podcasts that explore the House’s position at the intersection of art, culture and society. Featuring a rotating lineup of specialized hosts, each series examines a particular theme, with topics as varying as feminist art, styling and the environment, as well as informative discussions on the heritage of the House itself. Both Maria Grazia Chiuri and Kim Jones, since their respective arrivals, have produced collections that ask big questions, and both have been notable for their regular collaborations with a broad and sometimes surprising spectrum of artists, performers, writers and intellectuals. 
Dior Talks continues this level of interactive dialogue with a diverse range of guests who, through informal but informative conversations, open up about their areas of expertise and discuss their careers while delving as well as their interactions with the house of Dior.  

    [Female gaze] Maripol discusses her long and fascinating career in New York and her photographic collaborations with Dior

    [Female gaze] Maripol discusses her long and fascinating career in New York and her photographic collaborations with Dior

    Welcome to this second episode of the new Dior Talks series ‘The Female Gaze’. With the term developed in response to the writings of feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey, this podcast series which explore how the work of the female photographers and creatives collaborating with Dior offers a radically new and progressive image of women. 
    In this episode, series host Charlotte Jansen, a British journalist and author, speaks with Maripol, an icon of 1980s culture in New York and an influential artist, filmmaker, designer and stylist. Maripol discusses her extraordinary career and her passions and influences from her childhood in France to the heady days and multidisciplinary inspirations of Manhattan, and her photographic collaborations with Maria Grazia Chiuri, Creative Director of Women’s collections.
    Having moved to New York City in 1976 at the age of 20 with her then-boyfriend Edo Bertoglio, the Swiss photographer and director with whom she would have a highly fruitful artistic collaboration, Maripol became art director of Fiorucci by the early ‘80s, before opening her own boutique, Maripolitan, in the mid-80s. She was Madonna’s stylist for her first two iconic albums, creating the famous look for Like a Virgin, and also made numerous documentary films. She directed The Message, about the life of Keith Haring, and also produced Downtown 81, starring Jean-Michel Basquiat and Blondie. She is noted for her pioneering use of the Polaroid camera – her first SX-70 was a gift from Bertoglio – particularly for fashion photography and portraiture, and in 2014 published a book of her work, MARIPOLARAMA X.
    Always outspoken and audacious, she divulges her unique take on life, culture and feminism in this episode. She has always collaborated with remarkable individuals and has always been fascinated with fashion. She brought to it her broad education in the arts and her rebellious, punk sensibility, and as soon as she landed in New York, people noticed her for her unique style and self-made accessories. She fully embraced the collaborative spirit of the city at that time and has been creating and working with like-minded pioneers ever since, most recently with her Polaroid shoots of Maria Grazia Chiuri’s collections.

    • 29 分鐘
    [Female gaze] Maria Grazia Chiuri discusses how she chose to work exclusively with women photographers and creatives at Dior

    [Female gaze] Maria Grazia Chiuri discusses how she chose to work exclusively with women photographers and creatives at Dior

    Welcome to this first episode of the new Dior Talks series ‘The Female Gaze’. With the term developed in response to the writings of feminist film theorist Laura Mulvey, this podcast series will explore how the work of the female photographers and creatives collaborating with Dior offers a radically new and progressive image of women. 
    In this episode, series host Charlotte Jansen, a British journalist and author, speaks with Maria Grazia Chiuri about how the Creative Director of Women’s collections has initiated a new dialogue around the perception of women by women in the 21st century.
    Upon arriving at the House, Maria Grazia Chiuri made the idea of the female gaze an essential part of her work. Aware that the DNA of Dior is defined by femininity, she set out to explore how to make this correspond to her world view and chose to work solely with female photographers, writers and artists, which proved a surprisingly revolutionary concept. As she notes of her own experience, women behave differently when they are the subject of a female photographer. With the fashion world dominated by male image makers, she called on a wide variety of talents, some renowned in other areas – such as the war photographer Christine Spengler – and others much more under the radar, with the condition that they be given creative free rein in their interpretation of her work. Dior is a name recognized all over the world, so it was key to seek out an equally international roster of talents to convey non-stereotypical representations of Dior femininity, celebrating differences and rewriting preconceptions. 

    Discover a selection of works: 
    Laura Mulvey, « Visual pleasure and narrative cinema », Screen, n°16, Autumn 1975
    Cindy Sherman, Untitled film stills, 1977-1980 https://www.moma.org/collection/works/56618 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.moma.org_collection_works_56618&d=DwMFaQ&c=uSEuY5DFUpK1tHJgduTViA&r=ZoeRpUxF1WoTBmmViDtGtcGdrSzNU_CAXXCpWvrvP6g&m=03uzNago8Sk4itC0tl3dQk1KVtdBVOUZ1yToGGN2u-w&s=X1147sTHaBDE9SFENae28sE_L5Zp1oGPtJebRx1xAlo&e=)
    - Dior Cruise 2020 x Ruth Ginka Ossai  https://i-d.vice.com/en_uk/article/wjwv59/dior-new-cruise-campaign-modern-african-photography-female-gaze (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__i-2Dd.vice.com_en-5Fuk_article_wjwv59_dior-2Dnew-2Dcruise-2Dcampaign-2Dmodern-2Dafrican-2Dphotography-2Dfemale-2Dgaze&d=DwMFaQ&c=uSEuY5DFUpK1tHJgduTViA&r=ZoeRpUxF1WoTBmmViDtGtcGdrSzNU_CAXXCpWvrvP6g&m=OCVUrwmlxj6rnqadjU3dZItjjKaYFdPbpTbJeDTjl0g&s=dHKBpR3OAEOw39ltQGL9W9HQu9kS5vrJ6zkBffIrQhk&e=) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c40oibKskX8&list=PLzPXOOq1r2gFjNSl4siIBfzMLrSUcRBr0&index=5&t=0s (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3Dc40oibKskX8-26list-3DPLzPXOOq1r2gFjNSl4siIBfzMLrSUcRBr0-26index-3D5-26t-3D0s&d=DwMFaQ&c=uSEuY5DFUpK1tHJgduTViA&r=ZoeRpUxF1WoTBmmViDtGtcGdrSzNU_CAXXCpWvrvP6g&m=OCVUrwmlxj6rnqadjU3dZItjjKaYFdPbpTbJeDTjl0g&s=KjllX4oa4pG8Xy_BSBsuForsS_GWeeoG8RRiTNv_Xng&e=) 
    « Feminine, plural » : the women photographers shooting the Dior Cruise 2020 collection https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABcBejpQ7UQ&list=PLzPXOOq1r2gFjNSl4siIBfzMLrSUcRBr0&index=1 (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.youtube.com_watch-3Fv-3DABcBejpQ7UQ-26list-3DPLzPXOOq1r2gFjNSl4siIBfzMLrSUcRBr0-26index-3D1&d=DwMFaQ&c=uSEuY5DFUpK1tHJgduTViA&r=ZoeRpUxF1WoTBmmViDtGtcGdrSzNU_CAXXCpWvrvP6g&m=03uzNago8Sk4itC0tl3dQk1KVtdBVOUZ1yToGGN2u-w&s=5d4zqq8IjsALq0F0nC85UFwKFfPTDXpfA0aE7UTPhiI&e=)
    Deborah Tuberville ( 1932-2013) https://www.parismuseescollections.paris.fr/fr/recherche/type/oeuvre/auteur/Turbeville%2C%20Deborah (https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.parismuseescollections.paris.fr_fr_recherche_type_oeuvre_auteur_Turbeville-252C-2520Deborah&d=DwMFaQ&c=uSEuY5DFUpK1tHJgduTViA&r=B3S2U4a4CWqLr5FPigtwky3twY2KGZkKR1YBkR9INEo&m=

    • 27 分鐘
    [Heritage] Faces and figures: cementing the fame of Dior

    [Heritage] Faces and figures: cementing the fame of Dior

    In this fourth and final episode of the illuminating podcast series “Mes Chéries: The Women of Christian Dior”, recorded at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Oriole Cullen, curator of Modern Textiles and Fashion, and Justine Picardie, fashion editor and biographer, discuss the outsize role played by the Dior models and clients and by the editors who propelled the founding couturier’s name around the world. 
    When Monsieur Dior showed his famous first collection in 1947, his couture house, like every other, had its own roster of exclusive models. They worked as fit models through out the year, and during the weeks of showings in the salons, and on promotional trips, they were the embodiment of Dior creativity. Selected for their singular personalities as much as their figures, their range of physiques gave clients an idealized impression of how they themselves might look in the new season’s creations. 
    Those clients could well include royalty, as was the case, for example, with Princess Margaret who, along with her mother and sister, the future Queen Elizabeth II, was a passionate admirer and an early adopter of this revolutionary Paris style.
    Despite previously working as a hired hand, Monsieur Dior was already on several international radars before wowing the world with his debut collection under his own name. In fact, Carmel Snow, the famous editor-in-chief of Harper’s Bazaar at the time, and the one who coined the term “the New Look”, was just one of the media mavens who had recognized Monsieur Dior’s talents when he was part of the stable of designers working at Lucien Lelong, and Robert Piguet before that. Possessing a remarkable eye for talent, she commissioned illustrations from him and followed his career until, on the morning of February 12, 1947, she sat on a gilt chair at 30 Avenue Montaigne to watch a parade of clothes that, with one fell swoop, would change the world of fashion overnight and forever. 

    • 14 分鐘
    [Heritage] Stability and superstition: the women who guided Monsieur Dior

    [Heritage] Stability and superstition: the women who guided Monsieur Dior

    In this third episode of the enthralling podcast series “Mes Chéries: The Women of Christian Dior”, recorded at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Oriole Cullen, curator of Modern Textiles and Fashion, and Justine Picardie, fashion editor and biographer, talk about two more of the many important women in Monsieur Dior’s life: Suzanne Luling and Madame Delahaye.  
    Remaining faithful to several childhood friends from Granville, Monsieur Dior hired Suzanne Luling to take charge of sales and PR. She had long been a source of stability to him, and as his fame and responsibilities exponentially grew he relied heavily on her as a level-headed and highly capable influence. Having turned to her when his beloved sister had been deported during the war, he turned to her again for her ability at being good in a crisis, whether that was managing the frictions that occurred daily in the workplace, or faultlessly orchestrating events and elegantly taking care of press, buyers and clients from across the globe.  
    As a child in Granville, Monsieur Dior had been told by a fortune teller that women would be very important in his future and it would be to them that he would owe his great success. That sense of superstition that emerged at a young age would become deeply ingrained, and by the time he was due to open his own couture house, consultations with a clairvoyant became an everyday occurrence. The woman in question was Madame Delahaye, a suitably mysterious figure about whom very little is known, not even her first name, but the role she played in his life, and in his creative decisions, cannot be underestimated. In a bitter twist of irony, having listened faithfully to her every prediction up to that point, he disregarded what would turn out to be her final piece of advice to him and headed off to a health spa in Italy, a trip from which he would never return.

    • 10 分鐘
    [Heritage] Sense and sensation: the story of three distinctive Dior women

    [Heritage] Sense and sensation: the story of three distinctive Dior women

    In this second episode of the fascinating podcast series “Mes Chéries: The Women of Christian Dior”, recorded at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Oriole Cullen, curator of Modern Textiles and Fashion, and Justine Picardie, fashion editor and biographer, discuss three key women in Monsieur Dior’s life: Raymonde Zehnacker, Marguerite Carré and Mitzah Bricard.
    As this series reveals, a number of women had an outsized effect on the life of the celebrated couturier and the course of his career. He had initially worked with Raymonde Zehnacker at the house of Lucien Lelong, and when he left to start his own couture house she came with him as studio director, but exerted a much broader influence and importance, professionally and personally. Both Monsieur Dior’s right hand and his protector, he described her as his “second self”. Marguerite Carré, on the other hand, headhunted from the house of Jean Patou and appointed technical director, was the genius who deciphered his sketches and transformed his desires, however challenging, into real and covetable clothes.
    Mitzah  Bricard, the most fantastical of the three, and regularly still evoked today, [not least in the narrow ‘Mitzah’ scarf named after her,] was also the most enigmatic. This woman “without a past” cultivated an air of mystery, not least communicated by her signature wearing of veiled hats – she was ostensibly head of the millinery atelier, as well as being Monsieur Dior’s muse – and was never without copious jewelry, whatever the occasion, or a leopard-print scarf wrapped around her wrist. The ambiguity of her origins was reflected by the somewhat undefined part she played in the House, a part not rooted in any great appreciation of practicality. As the fashion editor Bettina Ballard once noted of her, she “only understood extravagant elegance” – which proved the perfect way to write herself into fashion history.

    • 13 分鐘
    [Heritage] Discover the women who shaped the history of Dior

    [Heritage] Discover the women who shaped the history of Dior

    In this first, highly compelling episode of the podcast series “Mes Chéries: The Women of Christian Dior”, recorded at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, Oriole Cullen, curator of Modern Textiles and Fashion, and Justine Picardie, fashion editor and biographer, discuss two of the most important and most influential women in Monsieur Dior’s life: his mother and his sister.
    An embodiment of Belle Époque society, Madeleine Dior, the founding couturier’s mother, lived a charmed existence. The wife of a wealthy industrialist, she could afford to dress well and, for the first part of his childhood, raised her son in a large, well-staffed villa overlooking the sea at Granville, where the expansive gardens, and his passion for spending time with her there to learn about plants and flowers, would exert an enormous influence on his later career.
    His sister, Catherine, younger by twelve years, was also passionate about flowers, and would in adulthood become a highly successful commercial grower. They were very close, despite their age gap, and when their mother died prematurely, he became almost a surrogate parent to her. During WWII, this passionate and principled young woman joined the French Resistance and was ultimately captured and imprisoned. Her distraught brother turned to another trusted woman, his clairvoyant, to be reassured that he would be reunited with his beloved Catherine.

    • 11 分鐘

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