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News, opinion, analysis, lifestyle and entertainment – we’ve got your Sunday morning listening covered with The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin on Newstalk ZB.

The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudki‪n‬ Newstalk ZB

    • News
    • 2.1 • 7 Ratings

News, opinion, analysis, lifestyle and entertainment – we’ve got your Sunday morning listening covered with The Sunday Session with Francesca Rudkin on Newstalk ZB.

    Jason Walls: Trans-Tasman bubble, India travel suspension and vaccine rollout

    Jason Walls: Trans-Tasman bubble, India travel suspension and vaccine rollout

    A two-week ban on all travellers arriving from India starts today.
    The temporary ban means travellers who have been in India in the past two weeks cannot enter the country.
    It was announced by the Prime Minister on Thursday and came after a surge in Covid-19 cases being reported at the New Zealand border, from people who had been in India.
    This was despite pre-flight testing showing the travellers did not have the virus 72 hours before leaving.
    Yesterday of the 10 new cases in managed isolation, eight were from India.
    While the ban until 28 April is legal, the Human Rights Commissioner has asked the government for a clearer justification on the decision, RNZ reports. 
    Chief Human Rights commissioner Paul Hunt said more information was needed on the reasons behind the suspension, which will be in place from April 11 to April 28.
    It is the first time New Zealand has stopped citizens or residents from returning.
    "While a public health emergency is a justification for limits to be placed on the free movement of people, any limitation on the rights of New Zealanders to return home must be clearly justified by the Government in accordance with its domestic and international human rights obligations," Hunt said.
    The commission could not assess whether the ban was lawful, unless the Government was transparent about its decision, he said.
    New Zealand has agreed under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights that no one shall be arbitrarily deprived of the right to enter their own country.
    The United Nations Human Rights Committee has said there are "few, if any, circumstances in which deprivation of the right to enter one's own country could be reasonable".
    Hunt said, "Temporarily banning New Zealanders from returning home from India is a significant limitation on their freedom of movement.
    "Clear justification for the limitation on this basic right is vital.
    "Regular review of the suspension is also crucial."
    On 9 April, almost two-thirds of Covid-19 cases detected in managed isolation during the previous 30 days were from India.
    Meanwhile, India has reported a record daily number of coronavirus infections - more than 145,000, and 794 deaths - its largest tally in more than five months.
    The severe second wave is being blamed on a reluctance to wear masks, and on crowding.
    The massive Hindu festival, the Kumbh Mela, is continuing on the banks of the Ganges river, with millions expected there next week.
    Text by RNZ
     

    • 5 min
    Sunday Panel: Should Easter trading rules be relaxed?

    Sunday Panel: Should Easter trading rules be relaxed?

    Calls for city councils to follow suit when it comes to trading rules today.
    Despite Easter Sunday not being a public holiday, current legislation stops shops from operating, unless their local Council's given permission for them to open.
    Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Dunedin, Palmerston North and Hamilton all have restrictions on businesses.
    Retail NZ Chief Executive Greg Harford says the rules are well past their expiry date.
    He says on one hand major city councils are stopping shops from operating, and on the other, the same councils are operating many of their own facilities including swimming pools.
    Listen above as Chris Lynch and Jo McCarroll discuss this issue and more with Francesca Rudkin on The Sunday Panel.

    • 12 min
    Megan Singleton: Aussies booking baches in NZ in anticipation of a travel bubble

    Megan Singleton: Aussies booking baches in NZ in anticipation of a travel bubble

    Despite new cases of COVID appearing locally, Australians are flocking to book accommodation in New Zealand - before a quarantine free trans-Tasman bubble is confirmed next week. 
    New data shows the pending bubble announcement has seen Australian bookings of holiday homes jump 117% in New Zealand over the past month.
    Surprisingly, bookings around ski areas are lower than expected with Australian’s opting for New Zealand beaches and locations better known for their vineyards and cuisine.
    The top 10 locations for Australians booking in New Zealand are Raglan, Tauranga, Waiheke, Marlborough, Mount Maunganui, Marlborough Sounds, Martinborough, Akaroa, Whangamata and Hanmer.

    • 9 min
    Whitcoulls Recommends: Win and Bright Burning Things

    Whitcoulls Recommends: Win and Bright Burning Things

    Win by Harlan Coben.
    I believe this is the first book in a new series which is a spinoff from the Myron Bolitar novels he’s famous for. Windsor “Win” Horne Lockwood III (a billionaire, if you couldn’t tell by the name) has been a sidekick to Myron in many of the previous books but takes centre stage in this one. He’s a most unlikeable character, but gets caught up in a murder in which he somehow seems to be implicated, but he has three things the FBI doesn't: a personal connection to the case; an ungodly fortune; and his own unique brand of justice.
    Bright Burning Things by Lisa Harding.
    The story of Sonya, a single mother struggling with her demons while bringing up her four year old son in Dublin. It’s a book about sinking very low, and finding your way back, and Sonya is entirely believable. It’s very moving.
    LISTEN ABOVE
     

    • 4 min
    Cherie Metcalfe: Founder and owner of Pepper & Me on her new cookbook Keepers

    Cherie Metcalfe: Founder and owner of Pepper & Me on her new cookbook Keepers

    Cherie Metcalfe is the founder and owner of popular foodie brand Pepper & Me.
    Starting out when her daughter Pepper was a baby, Cherie was selling her salt blends at the local markets.
    Pepper & Me is now a flourishing brand with over 30 different products stocked nationwide, there’s also a subscriber based recipe service and a huge following on Instagram where you’ll likely see her sharing how she cooks the family dinner.
    Now Cherie has added a cookbook!  It’s called Keepers, a collection of Cherie’s favourite recipes.  Cherie Metcalfe Francesca Rudkin on the show this morning.
    LISTEN ABOVE

    • 14 min
    Michelle Dickinson: Explaining the worrying increase of Cyberchondria

    Michelle Dickinson: Explaining the worrying increase of Cyberchondria

    The compulsion to look up symptoms and seek out health-related information using google, before heading to your doctor to ask for rounds of medical tests, is called cyberchondria.
    The pandemic has made it worse, where every sniffle or cough feels frightening and a sure sign that you have caught the virus.
    It's basically hypochondria made worse by the internet.
    Most doctors advise against turning to the internet and bringing a list of google diagnosis with you to the clinic.  However a new study suggests that using online resources to research symptoms may not be harmful after all – and could even lead to modest improvements in diagnosis.
    Previous research has been limited to observational studies of internet search behaviour.
    In the study they asked 5000 people to imagine somebody close to them was experiencing symptoms and asked them to use the an internet search to provide a diagnosis based on the given information.
    As well as diagnosing the condition, participants were asked to select a triage level, ranging from “let the health issue get better on its own” to calling the emergency services.
    Three-quarters of participants were able to identify the severity of a situation and appropriately choose when to seek care. In addition, people with prior health experience, including women, older adults and those with poor reported quality of life, were better at diagnosis.
    The conclusion? It seems that using the internet may actually help patients figure out what is wrong and for most people googling your symptoms before going to the doctor isn't as bad for you as we thought.

    • 6 min

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