30 episodes

60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation's government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation's history and government.


60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center's education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Project Citizen, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

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    • 4.3 • 69 Ratings

60-Second Civics is a daily podcast that provides a quick and convenient way for listeners to learn about our nation's government, the Constitution, and our history. The podcast explores themes related to civics and government, the constitutional issues behind the headlines, and the people and ideas that formed our nation's history and government.


60-Second Civics is produced by the Center for Civic Education. The show's content is primarily derived from the Center's education for democracy curricula, including We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, Project Citizen, Foundations of Democracy, and Elements of Democracy.

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4276, Native American Women in the Colonial Era: Women's History Month, Part 6

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4276, Native American Women in the Colonial Era: Women's History Month, Part 6

    Europeans were surprised that Native American women had so much power and influence, particularly within the Haudenosaunee nations. In those nations, women held political power within the tribes, appointing and removing chiefs at their discretion.



    Center for Civic Education

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4275, Nanye'hi: Women's History Month, Part 5

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4275, Nanye'hi: Women's History Month, Part 5

    Despite being known as the "War Woman of Chota," Nanye'hi, also known as Nancy Ward, was a Cherokee woman who would work for much of her life to ensure peace between the Cherokees and the Americans, while attempting to prevent the further seizure of Cherokee land.



    Center for Civic Education

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4274, Elizabeth Freeman: Women's History Month, Part 4

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4274, Elizabeth Freeman: Women's History Month, Part 4

    Elizabeth Freeman, also known as Mum Bett, escaped slavery in a way that was unusual: she took her case to court. She approached lawyer Theodore Sedgwick with this question: "I heard that paper read yesterday that says 'all men are born equal,' and that every man has a right to freedom ... won't the law give me my freedom?" Appealing to her natural rights and her rights under the Massachusetts Constitution of 1780, she sued for her freedom and won.



    Center for Civic Education

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4273, Ona Judge: Women's History Month, Part 3

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4273, Ona Judge: Women's History Month, Part 3

    Ona Judge escaped George and Martha Washington's household, where she was an enslaved housemaid, and made her way to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where she eluded George Washington's determined attempts to capture her. She made a new life for herself in New Hampshire, marrying and having three children. Her side of her remarkable story survives because she gave interviews to at least two abolitionist newspapers.



    Center for Civic Education

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4272, Coverture and the Colonial Era: Women's History Month, Part 2

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4272, Coverture and the Colonial Era: Women's History Month, Part 2

    A married woman living during the American colonial era would have lived under the legal doctrine called "coverture," where her legal identity was subsumed under that of her husband. William Blackstone wrote, "By marriage, the husband and wife are one person in the law: that is, the very being or legal existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, or at least is incorporated and consolidated into that of the husband: under whose wing, protection, and cover, she performs every thing." This was governed by colonial law before independence and state law after independence. It would not change substantially after the Revolution in most states, but divorce and child custody laws would change.



    Center for Civic Education

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4271, The Struggle for Equality: Women's History Month, Part 1

    60-Second Civics: Episode 4271, The Struggle for Equality: Women's History Month, Part 1

    It's Women's History Month! All this month, 60-Second Civics will explain the struggle for equal rights for women and how our Constitution and laws evolved to make our nation a more representative democracy. In this episode, we briefly trace the struggle of women for equal voting rights in the United States.



    Center for Civic Education

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
69 Ratings

69 Ratings

adrienne10 ,

1 minute doses to review your civics class

Feeling that many Americans really do not know/remember their civics, I started listening to this podcast so I would not be one of them. I tried to get my kids to listen, but one may need to have had a high school level civics class in order to grasp these tidbits in a bigger picture. Without the bigger picture, the tidbits remain factoids that are not necessarily helpful or leading to understanding.

So, for anybody with at least a high school civics class under their belt, these 1 minute podcasts are a great review. As I said, most Americans don't remember their civics, as illustrated by statements made in the media and public by politicians, media pundits, in churches, in public throughout the country. I highly recommend this podcast, whether you are really interested or not. You will be a better U.S. citizen because of it.

ligma4289374 ,

Short

Short

Babajaid ,

Great Podcast

This is such a wonderful service that teaches the history of the present so that we know why things are the way they are. It is easy to take some of the rights and privileges for granted when we don't know how we got here but 60-seconds civics help correct that. This is a very NECESSARY podcast. Thank you Center for Civic Education and Mark Gage for doing this well.

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