27 episodes

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

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    • Language Learning

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new soccer show complete with language support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

    Football Language Podcast: 2020 Club World Cup

    Football Language Podcast: 2020 Club World Cup

    In this week’s football language podcast, we look at some of the key words and phrases from the 2020 Club World Cup that recently took place in Qatar. Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here, and visit our site to access all the previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.







    Football Language Podcast: 2020 Club World Cup



















    Bayern are only the second side in Europe to sweep all before them and win six trophies in one season – do you know which other team managed this feat?











    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and staying safe wherever we are in the world. It’s just me today as Damon, who is based in Tokyo, is a little busy. Now on this short football language podcast we look back at the FIFA Club World Cup that took place in Qatar last weekend and which saw German and European champions Bayern Munich win their sixth trophy in the past nine months – amazing.







    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in German).



























    DF: Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com and that message was in German. Don’t forget that there’s a transcript to this podcast which you can access by coming along to our site. And you can follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram or you can drop us a line at: admin@languagecaster.com. Right, let’s take a look at some of the words and phrases that emerged from the 2020 FIFA Club World Cup tournament.







    Confederations







    This annual tournament sees the champions of the six confederations play off to see which team can be crowned the best club side in world football. The six confederations are as follows:









    * UEFA (Europe): Bayern Munich

    * CONMEBOL (South America): Palmeiras

    * AFC (Asia): Ulsan Hyundai

    * CONCACAF (Central and North America): UANL (Tigres)

    * CAF (Africa): Al Ahly

    * OFC (Oceania): Auckland City









    Now, New Zealand side Auckland withdrew – they failed to participate in the competition because of Covid restrictions – and the Qatari side Al-Duhil qualified as hosts.

    • 4 min
    Football Language Podcast: (to) Feed

    Football Language Podcast: (to) Feed

    In this week’s short football language podcast, we take a look at the verb ‘to feed‘, along with some other football language. Check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have any questions, suggestions or comments then please email us at: admin@languagecaster.com. (DB=Damon)



    Listening Report: (to) Feed

    DB: You’re listening to languagecaster.com. Hello everyone. Welcome to languagecaster and another short podcast on the language of football or soccer, depending on where you are in the world.  My name’s Damon, I’m based in Tokyo, and, as you may know if you are a regular listener, I’m one of the languagecaster team, the other being Damian in London. We both hope you are all keeping away from the corona virus wherever you are and are enjoying the football.

    So, on today’s show, I’m going to take a look at the verb to feed and how it can be used when talking about football.

    Stinger: You’re listening to languagecaster.com (in Korean)

    To Feed

    Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com, and that message was in Korean. Send us your message – you are listening to languagecaster.com in your language and we’ll add it to one of our shows. OK, let’s get started.

    ‘To feed‘ means to give food to. You can hear the resemblance between the verb ‘feed‘ and the noun ‘food‘, can’t you. So, you might feed your family, or feed your pet dog. Picture in your mind yourself putting food on a plate or in a bowl and then handing it to someone. We can also use ‘feed‘ to describe putting something in something – for example, you can feed wire or string through a hole, or you could feed data into a computer. You can even feed someone lies, tell them lies.

    But what about football? Well, I’ve already says that if you feed someone, it can mean you pass them food. In football if you feed a player, you pass them the ball, you supply them with the ball, so that they can then use it somehow – maybe run with it, shoot, or pass it on. Remember I talked about feeding some wire or string through a hole or a pipe – maybe an electrician is feeding an electric wire through a wall. Now, imagine a player feeding the ball between two opposing players so that his or her teammate can latch on to the pass, can collect the pass.

    Examples

    This week, I’ve been watching the Champions League, so let’s imagine we have a player like Mbappe and his teammate Florenzi. We might say that Florenzi fed Mbappe, meaning he passed the ball to the striker. Other structures could be, Florenzi fed the ball through to Mbappe, or Florenzi fed the ball across the area. This last example is a little different as it is not feeding one player but giving an opportunity to anyone.

    Stinger: You’re listening to languagecaster.com (Arsenal)

    Right, let’s look at some real examples from football reports. First, the structure feed a player:

    (Bernardo Silva) patiently and inventively fed Raheem Sterling at the back post to extend the lead by a further goal. (Liverpool Echo, Feb. 2021)

    And here is the structure, feed the ball to someone or somewhere.

    Peter Clarke fed the ball across the face of goal after Stanley failed to clear a corner and Ellis had the easy task of tapping into an empty net at the far ...

    • 6 min
    Football Language Podcast: (to) Gift

    Football Language Podcast: (to) Gift

    In this week’s short football language podcast, we take a look at the verb ‘to gift‘, along with some other football language. Check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have any questions, suggestions or comments then please email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.



    Listening Report: (to) Gift

    DB: You’re listening to languagecaster.com. Hi there everyone. Glad you could join us for another short football language podcast. My name’s Damon, I’m based in Tokyo, and I’m one of the languagecaster team, the other being Damian in London. We both hope you are all well wherever you are and are enjoying the football.

    On this show, I’m going to take a look at the verb to gift and how you might use it, or hear it, when talking about football.

    Stinger: You’re listening to languagecaster.com (in French)

    To Gift

    Yes, you are listening to languagecaster.com, and that wonderful message was in French. OK, let’s get started with our phrase for today and how to use it.

    Let’s start with the word ‘gift‘ as a noun. A gift is a present. You give people presents, or gifts, on special occasions like birthdays or weddings. Mostly, you hear ‘gift‘ as a noun, but today, we’re interested in its use as a verb. Notice I used the word ‘give’ with gift or present just now – give someone a gift, but you can also ‘gift‘ someone something.

    But it would be unusual to hear someone say ‘she gifted a gift‘ or ‘he gifted his friend a present‘. But in football you will hear this verb when a player makes a mistake and ‘gives‘ or ‘gifts‘ the opponent a goal, the ball, or a chance.

    Now, long term listeners will know I am a Liverpool fan and this weekend they played Manchester City. They lost 4-1 at home – ouch! But in the game, their goalkeeper made some big mistakes which led to Manchester City scoring twice –  . Here’s how bt.com described it –

    Liverpool’s Premier League title defence appears to have ended at the feet of Alisson Becker as two awful errors by the goalkeeper gifted Manchester City a 4-1 victory at Anfield.

    And another report, this time from the athletic.com –

    Ilkay Gundogan missed a penalty for City in the first half but made amends by opening the scoring shortly after the break. Mohamed Salah then converted a penalty to equalise, before Alisson’s errors gifted City a two-goal lead through Gundogan and Raheem Sterling.

    So the goalkeeper, Alisson’s mistakes, gave, or gifted, Manchester City the victory, or a two-goal lead in  these examples. You can say gift the win, gift a victory, gift a lead, gift a goal, and so on. But remember, when we are talking about the game it will be in the past tense, gifted, they gifted the opposition the victory, they gifted the lead etc.

    Stinger: You’re listening to languagecaster.com (Bayern Munich fan)

    (to) Put on a Plate

    DB: Another phrase, which is also about giving a chance to score to another player is the verb phrase, to put it on a plate. If you put something on a plate you serve some food to somebody In football it means you pass the ball to your teammate,

    • 5 min
    Football Language Podcast: Can’t Buy a Goal

    Football Language Podcast: Can’t Buy a Goal

    In this week’s football language podcast, Damon and Damian get together to chat about some of the football words and phrases from the past week, including the cliche ‘can’t buy a goal‘. They also review some of the latest football-language posts that the languagecaster team have recently uploaded to the new-look website and take a look at their favourite teams’ ups and downs from the season so far. Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here, and visit our site to access all the previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.







    Football Language Podcast: Can’t Buy a Goal







     



















    DF: You’re listening to languagecaster.com. Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and staying safe wherever we are in the world. I’m here in a cold and wet east London and of course still in lockdown but enjoying as much football as I can watch – and that’s despite my team Tottenham’s terrible week! Now, as regular listeners to the show will know our other contributor to the podcast is Damon who is based in Tokyo – hello Damon!







    DB: Hi Damian.







    DF: Good to hear from you Damon. How are things in Tokyo?







    DB: Well, like most of the world, COVID is on the news all day and everyday, but like you, I’ve been watching football when I get the chance. Indeed, I watched our teams Tottenham and Liverpool play an exciting game a few days ago.







    DF: I’m not sure it was that exciting for Spurs fans – we lost 3-1 and probably even worse than that was the fact that we also lost our talisman striker Harry Kane. Oh, losing at home, even to the champions, is never fun!







    DB: Yes, losing at home is never good. Liverpool lost their three-year unbeaten run at home with a 1-0 loss to Burnley the game before playing Spurs, so it’s been a bit up and down as a fan recently. Actually, the season has been a bit up and down hasn’t it, for both Liverpool and Spurs? When they met in December, Spurs were top and Liverpool second, weren’t they?







    Highs & Lows – Liverpool and Spurs







    DF: Yes, that seems so long ago now for Spurs as we are not playing well at all. Tell me Damon, what have been the high and low points for so far as a Liverpool fan?







     







    DB: There’ve been quite a few, but the low was probably losing 7-2 to Aston Villa. Seven. Two. That’s embarrassing especially when Liverpool are the current champions. That was a real shock, although it has to be said that Villa scored with almost all their shots, but Liverpool looked very, very slow and lacked any spark or ideas. That was a worrying time. As for the high, well, sorry, but Bobby Firmino’s extra time winner against Tottenham which end...

    • 9 min
    Football Language Podcast: Knock A Team Out Of The Cup

    Football Language Podcast: Knock A Team Out Of The Cup

    In this short football language post we explain the expression ‘Knock A Team Out Of The Cup‘. Check out our glossary of footballing phrases here. If you have any suggestions, contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Football Language Podcast: Knock A Team Out Of The Cup

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and staying safe wherever we are in the world. Now, this week’s football language is all about when a team is beaten in cup football; and the phrase is, ‘to be knocked out of the cup’. In cup football, such as the FA Cup in England or the Copa del Rey in Spain, one team progresses to the next round if they win with the other team leaving the competition and we can say that this team has been knocked out of the cup. Let’s have a look at an example with the phrase:



    * Leicester knocked Brentford out of the Cup

    * Brentford were knocked out of the Cup (by Leicester)



    In the first example, Leicester appear first in the sentence as the emphasis is on them winning – they defeated Brentford, while in the second example the focus is on the defeated side, Brentford – they were knocked out of the cup. Now sometimes we can say ‘by Leicester’ if you want to add more information.

    Here’s another example, this time from the BBC website, after this weekend’s FA Cup 4th Round tie between Southampton and last season’s winners, Arsenal.

    Example: A strong Southampton side knocked holders Arsenal out of the FA Cup in the fourth round courtesy of a first-half own goal on Saturday.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in French).

    DF: Thanks everyone for listening – we hope you enjoyed our look at the phrase ‘knock a team out of a cup‘. Listen out for examples of this phrase when you are watching cup football and maybe you can let us know how we would say this in another language. Drop us a line at admin@languagecaster.com or, of course, you can leave a comment in the section below the post here at languagecaster.

    Don’t forget there is also a transcript for this report which can be accessed for free here at languagecaster.com. OK, myself and Damon, who of course is in Tokyo, will be back this weekend with some more football language. Enjoy all the football this week and we’ll see you soon. Bye bye.

    • 2 min
    Football Language Podcast: In the hat

    Football Language Podcast: In the hat

    In this short football language post we explain the expression ‘to be in the hat‘ which is often used when describing knockout football. Check out our football glossary and football cliches pages for hundreds more explanations of the language of soccer. If you have questions or comments about this or any other phrase then email us at: admin@languagecaster.com.



    Football Language Podcast: In the hat

    DF: Hello everyone, this is Damian from the Learning English Through Football team. I hope we are all doing well and staying safe wherever we are in the world. Now, today’s football language podcast will look at a phrase which is connected to knockout football and in particular to the draw for each round. And the phrase is, ‘To be in the hat’. Don’t forget that there is a transcript for this report which can be accessed from our site at languagecaster.com.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Thai).

    DF: Now, recently the third round of the FA Cup took place in England and we can hear and read quite a lot of words and phrases associated with knockout tournaments including the phrase, ‘to be in the hat‘. If a team qualifies for the next round of a knockout competition we can say that they are in the hat which means that they are still in the competition and are ready to be drawn against another side. A hat was often used to decide which teams would face each other in each phase or round of a competition. Drawing or pulling names or numbers out of the hat suggests a randomness and fairness to the process and as there are no seeds this means that any team could face any other team.

    If a team is in the hat it means that they are in the draw for the next round; that they are still involved in the cup competition which can be seen from the following example: ‘Being in hat for next round is all that matters to Benitez’ (Irish Independent, March 2007). This means that the manager (Benitez) really wants to qualify for the next round of the competition – he really wants his side to be ‘in the hat‘. Now, Non-league side Chorley are delighted to be in the hat for the fourth round of this year’s FA Cup and when their name came out of the hat during the draw they were paired (or drawn) with Premier League side Wolves. I wonder wiill they still be in the hat for future rounds?

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in French).

    DF: Thanks everyone for listening – we hope you enjoyed our look at the phrase ‘to be in the hat‘. Listen out for examples of this phrase when you are watching cup football and maybe you can let us know how this phrase is said in another language. Drop us a line at admin@languagecaster.com or, of course,

    • 3 min

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