23 episodes

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new football language show complete with vocabulary support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

Learn English Through Football languagecaster.com

    • Education

Welcome to all English language learners and teachers to languagecaster.com and its free football podcast. Every week a new football language show complete with vocabulary support for students who wish to improve their English language skills.

    Football Language Podcast: World Cup 1982 Brazil vs Italy [From the Archive]

    Football Language Podcast: World Cup 1982 Brazil vs Italy [From the Archive]

    English Through Football Podcast – World Cup 1982 Brazil vs Italy: In this podcast we continue with our reviews of some of the great World Cup matches by looking at the 1982 second round Group C match between Brazil and Italy. This is another game from the #WorldCupAtHome series from FIFA.com in which we review some of the words and phrases used to describe this wonderful match, while we also go over what happened in the rest of the 1982 competition from Spain. You can listen to the podcast by clicking on the file below while you can also subscribe and listen to all our football-language podcasts. If you’d like to show your support for what we do then think about becoming a patron (through Patreon) [We no longer use Patreon (2022)]. There is a transcript for this show which may help you to improve your language skills by reading as you listen, or if you are a teacher of English you can use the transcript to make different kinds of activities for your learners. If you have any questions, suggestions or comments then please email us at: admin@languagecaster.com (Damian=DF).

    Introduction

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    DF: Hello again everyone, this is Damian from the languagecaster team and you are listening to the Learn English Through Football Podcast.

    We hope, of course, that you are all well and safe. Now as you know, here at languagecaster.com we have been following some of the classic World Cup matches that have featured on FIFA.com’s website in their #WorldCupAtHome series. Now, we have already looked at the match between Spain and the Netherlands from the 2014 World Cup, the quarter-final between the Netherlands and Brazil from the 2010 World Cup in South Africa and the cracker between France and Brazil in the quarter-final of the 1986 World Cup. On today’s podcast we look at the 1982 World Cup second round match between Brazil and Italy which is often described as one of the greatest ever in World Cup history. At the start of the podcast we talk a little about the background of the tournament by looking at some of the context to this match: Who were the star players? What were the big controversies in the competition? Which teams were lucky or unlucky? And which sides reached the second round of matches? After this we look at some of the words and phrases used to describe the game itself before finishing up with a...

    • 11 min
    Football Language Podcast: Son Heung-min’s Return to Goalscoring (2022-23)

    Football Language Podcast: Son Heung-min’s Return to Goalscoring (2022-23)

    On this short football language podcast for learners of English we look at some of the language used recently to describe Son Heung-min’s return to goalscoring, including, ‘break his duck‘; ‘scoring streak’ and ‘form is temporary but class is permanent‘. You can read the transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Football Language: Son Heung-min’s Return to Goalscoring (2022-23)

    DF: Hello again everyone and welcome to Languagecaster.com – the football-language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game of football. I’m Damian and I am one of the Languagecaster team and I’m based here in London, while the other team member, is of course Damon and he is in Japan.

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    Now, on this very brief football language podcast, I’m going to look at some language used to describe Tottenham and Korean striker Son Heung-min’s return to goalscoring form. He had failed to score in his previous six matches, which for the joint winner of the Golden Boot from last season was a long time without a goal. In fact, we could say that it was a goal drought. Sometimes we might hear the phrase ‘they can’t buy a goal‘ which means a striker has not scored for a long time and does not look like they will score for a long time either; they are in a bad run of goal-scoring form. So, the Korean striker was dropped to the bench for the recent Premier League match against Leicester but came on after 59 minutes to score a hat-trick and go home with the match ball. Has Son broken his goal drought and returned to goal-scoring form? Well, as a Spurs fan, I am hoping the answer is yes!

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Mongolian)

    OK, let’s take a look at some language to describe this return to form.

    Form is temporary but class is permanent

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    • 6 min
    Main Listening Report: Ronaldo – O Fenômeno [From the archives]

    Main Listening Report: Ronaldo – O Fenômeno [From the archives]

    [From the archives – first published in 2011]

    This week’s main report continues with our series of profiling football super stars. Earlier this week we saw the retirement of one of the greatest strikers of this generation, O Fenômeno, Ronaldo. Explanations of key vocabulary (in bold) can be found at the foot of the post. You can listen to the report by clicking on the link above and you can read the transcript below with key vocabulary explained at the bottom of the post. If you have any questions, suggestions or comments then please email us at: admin@languagecaster.com

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    Introduction

    Ronaldo started his career at Cruzeiro in Belo Horizonte before moving to the Dutch League with PSV Eindhoven as a 17 year old. There, despite not winning a league title, he scored a very impressive 66 goals in only 71 appearances before moving on to Barcelona under English manager Bobby Robson. That 1996-7 season at the Camp Nou made Ronaldo a star as he netted an amazing 34 goals in 37 games and though he did not win a league title with the Catalan side he did pick up the first of two World Player of the Year awards – making him the youngest ever recipient – along with the European Cup Winners Cup and the Spanish Cup. After only one season there, however, he moved to Serie A and to Inter Milan where he scored another 59 goals in only 68 games.

    Brazil

    Now he made 97 appearances for the national side scoring 62 goals including a record 15 in the World Cup – overtaking the great Gerd Muller to do so. I was lucky to have seen him score 3 of those goals – first when he scored the only goal of the game in the 2002 World Cup semi-final 1-0 win over Turkey and then the two goals in the final against Germany, which won the trophy for Brazil but also sealed an amazing comeback for Ronaldo.

    Injuries

    4 years earlier in the final in Paris he had suffered an attack before the game and though he played was not anywhere near full fitness. A year later, while playing for Inter, he suffered a serious knee injury that kept him out of the sport for 6 months and then when he returned he lasted only a few minutes on the pitch as he yet again badly damaged his knee. To come back from the drama of the 1998 World Cup final and then two serious knee injuries demonstrated not only his talent but also his courage and determination.

    Madrid, Milan and Corinthians

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    After the 2002 World Cup win he moved on to Real Madrid in Spain and, despite lacking the same frightening speed when he had last playe...

    • 3 min
    Football Language Podcast: Bring Down an Opponent – WSL 2022 Liverpool v Chelsea

    Football Language Podcast: Bring Down an Opponent – WSL 2022 Liverpool v Chelsea

    On this football language podcast for learners of English we look at the phrase ‘Bring down an opponent‘ which was used to describe the winning goal in the WSL opening match between Chelsea and Liverpool. You can read the transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Football Language Podcast: Bring Down an Opponent – WSL 2022 Liverpool v Chelsea

    DF: Hello again everyone and welcome to Languagecaster.com – the football-language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game of football. I’m Damian and I am one half of the Languagecaster team, Damon, the other team member, is of course based in Japan.

    Now on today’s show we look at some language from a match from the Women’s Super League here in England – the WSL. We are going to look at some language that appeared in the Guardian newspaper about the Liverpool versus Chelsea match last weekend in which the home side shocked (or stunned) the champions Chelsea 2-1. All three goals in the game were scored from the penalty spot and we are going to look at the language used to describe how the final penalty was awarded.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (Al-Hilal (Sudan) fan)

    Break down the right/Bring down an opponent/Sliding tackle

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    So, this rather long sentence describes the play that led to the winning penalty. We are going to look at some of the language from it. First of all phrase ‘to break down the right‘ which means that a player is attacking on the right hand side of the pitch. The verb ‘break’ suggests that it is a counter attack, that is, the team was defending but they won the ball and then quickly attacked their opponents; the player (Stengel) broke out of defence to set up an attack. So, she moved down the right wing and she was being chased or pursued by the Chelsea defender Buchanan who then brought her down. To bring down an opponent means that the opponent falls to the floor because they’ve been tackled hard or they have been fouled. So, the Chelsea defender brought down the Liverpool attacker and because she was brought down (we could also say taken down here) and she was brought down in the box or the penalty area then a penalty was given or awarded to Liverpool. The Chelsea player used a sliding tackle to bring down t...

    • 6 min
    Learn English Through Football Podcast: Shock Defeats – 2022-23 Champions League

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: Shock Defeats – 2022-23 Champions League

    On this football language podcast for learners of English we look back at some of the shock defeats from the first set of group matches in this season’s (2022-23) Champions League. You can read the transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: Shock Defeats – 2022-23 Champions League

    DF: Hello again everyone and welcome to Languagecaster.com – the football-language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game of football. I’m Damian and I am one half of the Languagecaster team, Damon the other team member is of course based in Japan. I am back in London after my trip to Ireland last week and the weather here is starting to become a little cooler as we move into Autumn. Now, as many of you will know, there are no Premier League matches this weekend due to the passing of the Queen here in the UK. But on today’s show we are going to look back at some of the language from the first set of group stage matches from this season’s Champions League and in particular at the phrase ‘shock defeat‘. Now, recently we have discussed the expression ‘heavy defeat‘ which is used to describe a thrashing – a really bad loss – but a shock defeat is one which is not expected at all, it is a surprise.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in Irish)

    Dinamo Zagreb 1 v 0 Chelsea

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    Croatian side Dinamo Zagreb pulled off a big surprise or shock with their 1-0 home win against Chelsea. The home side have not done well in previous Champions League matches winning only five out of 43 so this result was a big shock indeed. The BBC report used the verb ‘to pull off a shock‘ which is another way of saying to shock; they shocked Chelsea with this victory. Indeed, this was such a shock that the Chelsea manager was sacked a couple of days later.

    RB Leipzig 1 v 4 Shakhtar Donetsk

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    So, in this Mirror report,

    • 5 min
    Learn English Through Football Podcast: 2022-23 Champions League Preview

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: 2022-23 Champions League Preview

    On this football language podcast for learners of English we look ahead to this season’s Champions League by taking a look at some of the favourites and dark horses for the title. You can read the transcript for this podcast below, while you can also check out our glossary of footballing phrases here and visit our site to access all our previous posts and podcasts. If you have any suggestions or questions then you can contact us at admin@languagecaster.com.

    Learn English Through Football Podcast: 2022-23 Champions League Preview

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    DF: Hello again everyone and welcome to Languagecaster.com – the football-language podcast for learners of English who love the beautiful game of football. I’m Damian and I’m in a rather rainy Ireland (no surprise there) after being in Belfast for a conference along with fellow Languagecaster team member Damon. It was lovely to see him again and we enjoyed some great evenings watching football (he was extremely happy with Liverpool’s last-gasp winner against Newcastle) and of course it was great to present with him at the conference. Now, travelling to the conference explains why we are a little late with the podcast this week – so apologies for that. B ut on this week’s show we take a look at the upcoming Champions League season. We are going to take a look at some of the background to the competition, look at some of the favourites and dark horses and maybe offer a prediction or two.

    Stinger: You are listening to languagecaster.com (in German)

    Background

    Now, the pre-qualifiers for the 2022-23 Champions League started way back in June but this week the group stages begin this week and there 32 teams from 15 different countries all battling to make the final at the Atatürk Olympic Stadium in Istanbul on June 10th next year. Now, this is the 31st time that the Champions League competition has taken place though it will be the 68th overall (of course the European Cup started in 1955). The 32 teams have been organised into eight groups of four and the top two in each of these groups will qualify for the last-16 knock-out stage. This year, because of the 2022 World Cup taking place in November and December, the group stage matches will take place in September and October – so the games will come thick and fast which means there will be no break at all. There will also be an innovation (that’s somet...

    • 8 min

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