167 episodes

Meet medical students and residents, clinicians and educators, health care thought leaders and researchers in this podcast from the journal Academic Medicine. Episodes chronicle the stories of these individuals as they experience the science and the art of medicine. Guests delve deeper into the issues shaping medical schools and teaching hospitals today. Subscribe to this podcast and listen as the conversation continues.

The journal Academic Medicine serves as an international forum to advance knowledge about the principles, policy, and practice of research, education, and patient care in academic settings.

Please note that the opinions expressed in this podcast are the guests’ alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the AAMC or its members.

Academic Medicine Podcast Academic Medicine

    • Education
    • 3.9 • 42 Ratings

Meet medical students and residents, clinicians and educators, health care thought leaders and researchers in this podcast from the journal Academic Medicine. Episodes chronicle the stories of these individuals as they experience the science and the art of medicine. Guests delve deeper into the issues shaping medical schools and teaching hospitals today. Subscribe to this podcast and listen as the conversation continues.

The journal Academic Medicine serves as an international forum to advance knowledge about the principles, policy, and practice of research, education, and patient care in academic settings.

Please note that the opinions expressed in this podcast are the guests’ alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the AAMC or its members.

    Someone Else’s Mother

    Someone Else’s Mother

    “My time, energy, and focus are finite; one clear, properly motivated action will come at the cost of another. It is easy to think this means I will miss out on important moments, or that I may disappoint some for the benefit of others. But the antidote is to recognize that each experience is special.”
    Fourth-year medical student Fletcher Bell reflects on doctors’ overlapping duties to their patients and family.
    This essay placed third in the 2021 Hope Babette Tang Humanism in Healthcare Essay Contest and was published in the October 2021 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 6 min
    The Eco-Normalization Model: A New Framework for Evaluating Innovations

    The Eco-Normalization Model: A New Framework for Evaluating Innovations

    Guest Deena Hamza, PhD, joins hosts Toni Gallo and Research in Medical Education (RIME) Committee member and assistant editor Dan Schumacher, MD, PhD, MEd, to discuss a new framework for evaluating innovations, including why and how this model was developed and the ways it can be used in medical education.
    This is the third episode in a 3-part series of discussions with RIME authors about their medical education research and its implications for the field. Find the complete 2021 RIME supplement, which is free to read and download, at academicmedicine.org.
    Read the article discussed in this episode: Eco-Normalization: Evaluating the Longevity of an Innovation in Context.
    A transcript of this episode is available at academicmedicineblog.org.

    • 31 min
    Learning to Show Patients You are Listening From 3,000 Miles Away

    Learning to Show Patients You are Listening From 3,000 Miles Away

    It is often minute details such as the lack of internet, transportation, or a signature that can prevent people from completing an application for food stamps or the medication they need. By acknowledging patient experiences and reflecting on what we have heard, we can more effectively tailor the support we give to find patient-centered solutions.
    Katherine M. Kutzer, a recent graduate of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, reflects on her experience calling patients of a community health center at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic and how she came to understand the significance of listening to—and truly hearing—patients when they speak.
    The essay read in this episode was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the October 2021 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 5 min
    The Deliberate Practice of Caring

    The Deliberate Practice of Caring

    Just like technical expertise, expert caring can be taught and deliberately practiced. As educators, we must study it, measure it, and build consensus on an ideal framework. And above all, we must value it, not only in medical students and doctors, but in everyone.
    Bonnie M. Miller, professor of medical education and administration at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tennessee and senior director of scholarly communications at the Kern National Network for Caring and Character in Medicine in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, reflects on the significance of caring, and how it is just as important to doctoring as procedural knowledge and skills.
    The essay read in this episode was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the August 2021 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 5 min
    Growing Trust in Patient-Physician Relationships

    Growing Trust in Patient-Physician Relationships

    Guest Richard Baron, MD, joins hosts Toni Gallo and deputy editor Colin West, MD, PhD, to discuss the importance of trust in patient-physician relationships and ways physicians can build trust and overcome mistrust with patients and communities, including in conversations about COVID-19.  
    Read the article discussed in this episode: A Trust Initiative in Health Care: Why and Why Now?
    A transcript of this episode is available at academicmedicineblog.org.

    • 36 min
    Unspoken Challenges

    Unspoken Challenges

    “The importance of fostering trust with families cannot be overstated, and effective communication techniques make up just one part of the complex puzzle. Body language is often considered to be the most important part of communication, but in extraordinary times, we had to rely on other tools such as tone of voice and content of speech.”
    Edwin Wei Sheng Thong, a senior resident in the Department of Haematology-Oncology at the National University Health System in Singapore, discusses the importance of effective communication and the intricacies required while treating a patient in the intensive care unit during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    The essay read in this episode was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the October 2021 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
42 Ratings

42 Ratings

megan@podcastingyou ,

Amazing Content!

The Academic Medicine Podcast does such a good job covering a variety of topics. The guests offer valuable insight as well. I would recommend this podcast to anyone looking to be inspired and informed!

Top Podcasts In Education

You Might Also Like