100 episodes

Meet medical students and residents, clinicians and educators, health care thought leaders and researchers in this podcast from the journal Academic Medicine. Episodes chronicle the stories of these individuals as they experience the science and the art of medicine. Guests delve deeper into the issues shaping medical schools and teaching hospitals today. Subscribe to this podcast and listen as the conversation continues.

The journal Academic Medicine serves as an international forum to advance knowledge about the principles, policy, and practice of research, education, and patient care in academic settings.

Please note that the opinions expressed in this podcast are the guests’ alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the AAMC or its members.

Academic Medicine Podcast Academic Medicine

    • Education
    • 3.8, 31 Ratings

Meet medical students and residents, clinicians and educators, health care thought leaders and researchers in this podcast from the journal Academic Medicine. Episodes chronicle the stories of these individuals as they experience the science and the art of medicine. Guests delve deeper into the issues shaping medical schools and teaching hospitals today. Subscribe to this podcast and listen as the conversation continues.

The journal Academic Medicine serves as an international forum to advance knowledge about the principles, policy, and practice of research, education, and patient care in academic settings.

Please note that the opinions expressed in this podcast are the guests’ alone, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the AAMC or its members.

    Clinician Well-Being During COVID-19

    Clinician Well-Being During COVID-19

    Hosts Toni Gallo and associate editor Dr. Colin West (@ColinWestMDPhD) and guest Dr. Jonathan Ripp discuss the state of clinician well-being during COVID-19 and how it's similar or different to what we’ve seen before. Dr. Ripp talks about what he and his colleagues at Mount Sinai are doing to identify and mitigate stressors for clinicians and support their workforce. And the group looks to the future and what well-being issues we might see as a result of this pandemic.
    Read Dr. Ripp’s article discussed in this episode, as well as the complete collection of COVID-19 articles published in Academic Medicine, at https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/pages/collectiondetails.aspx?TopicalCollectionId=68. New content is added every week, and all articles are free to read.

    • 32 min
    The Burdens We Bear

    The Burdens We Bear

    "Every clinician can remember his or her first real code as a singular event, but often unspoken is how these experiences chip away at the body, mind, and soul of even the most steadfast of people. Piece by piece, the mosaic of a fledgling medical student builds, cracks, and rebuilds with the ever-present risk of shattering altogether in the crucible."
    Medical student Damond Ng describes his first code and what he learned about the beautiful burden that physicians bear trying to keep harm at bay.
    This essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the May 2020 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 5 min
    Well-Being and the Learning Environment: Systems-Level Changes to Reduce Burnout and Depression in Learners

    Well-Being and the Learning Environment: Systems-Level Changes to Reduce Burnout and Depression in Learners

    Hosts Toni Gallo and assistant editor for trainee engagement Dr. Jesse Burk Rafel (@jbrafel) and guest Dr. Lotte Dyrbye (@dyrbye) discuss burnout in medical students and residents, including new recommendations from the National Academies about systems-level changes to foster well-being in learners. 
    Read Dr. Dyrbye's commentary, “Redesigning the Learning Environment to Promote Learner Well-Being and Professional Development,” discussed in this episode at academicmedicine.org.

    • 41 min
    The Burdened Learner: Clinical Wards and the Effects on Student Curiosity

    The Burdened Learner: Clinical Wards and the Effects on Student Curiosity

    "In the classroom, if I had a question, I would ask it. 'There are no dumb questions,' we were told. On the wards, I felt as if that standard no longer applied. I was fearful both that my questions would slow or inhibit patient care and that I would be considered ignorant for my curiosity."
    Dr. Nathan Kong describes the importance of fostering curiosity in medical students, especially as they adapt to practicing clinical care.  
    This essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the April 2020 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 5 min
    The Generosity of Health Professionals Across Academic Medicine in Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic

    The Generosity of Health Professionals Across Academic Medicine in Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Hosts Toni Gallo and editor-in-chief Dr. Laura Roberts (@_Roberts_Laura) and guest Dr. Alison Whelan (@AlisonWhelanMD) discuss discuss how academic medicine is responding to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact the crisis has had on the many mission areas of the field. They also discuss how the pandemic is affecting health professionals at all levels as well as the lasting changes to medicine and medical education that we might see, including how society views and values health professionals.
    Read the articles discussed in this episode, including the complete collection of COVID-19 articles published in Academic Medicine, at https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/pages/collectiondetails.aspx?TopicalCollectionId=68. New content will be added to the collection every week, and all articles are free to read.

    • 34 min
    Two Days and Twenty Years

    Two Days and Twenty Years

    "Sick versus not sick. Discerning this is a skill I first heard about long ago as a third-year medical student, then honed during my acting internship, residency, and 2 decades as an attending. ... And still, in this moment, I questioned whether I was making the right decision. Impostor syndrome reared its head."
    Dr. Terry Kind describes the useful purpose self-doubt can play throughout a physician's career. It helped her to think critically and make better decisions in caring for a 2-day old infant. 
    This essay was published in the Teaching and Learning Moments column in the April 2020 issue of Academic Medicine. Read the essay at academicmedicine.org.

    • 5 min

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5
31 Ratings

31 Ratings

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