18 episodes

Brief biographies of permanent residents of Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia and West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cywnyd, Pennsylvania. Often educational, always entertaining.

All Bones Considered: Laurel Hill Stories Joe Lex

    • History
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Brief biographies of permanent residents of Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia and West Laurel Hill Cemetery in Bala Cywnyd, Pennsylvania. Often educational, always entertaining.

    The Calder Connection: Alexander Milne & Alexander Stirling, The Warner Plot, and Henry Charles Lea

    The Calder Connection: Alexander Milne & Alexander Stirling, The Warner Plot, and Henry Charles Lea

    Alexander Milne Calder was a Scottish-born sculptor who came to Philadelphia and was given the commission for statuary for the City Hall.  He managed to squeeze in a monument for the Warner Family at Laurel Hill Cemetery that is probably the most photographed grave site on the property.  His son Alexander Stirling Calder is best remembered for Swann Fountain on Logan Circle, but he was also commissioned to do the statue for the grave of famed historian Henry Charles Lea, also at Laurel Hill.  The Calders are interred at West Laurel Hill under a large Celtic cross.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Fathers of American Medicine, Part 1

    Fathers of American Medicine, Part 1

    Robley Dunglison was born and educated in England but recruited to be the first Professor of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson’s University of Virginia, where he also became Jefferson’s private physician.  Later he moved to Philadelphia and was recognized as the Father of American Physiology.  Constantine Hering was born and educated in Germany and learned the homeopathic methods of fellow countryman Samuel Hahnemann; he brought these beliefs with him to Philadelphia and is considered the Father of Homeopathic Medicine in the United States.  Malcolm Macfarlan was born in Scotland but educated in the United States where he served in the Civil War; upon returning to Philadelphia, he worked under Hering as Chief of Surgery and became the Father of Homeopathic Surgery.  Oscar Allis was US born and educated; he became the Father of Orthopedic Surgery at Jefferson Medical College and invented a surgical instrument which is still used thousands of times daily around the world. 

    • 55 min
    Curtis Publishing Company and The Saturday Evening Post

    Curtis Publishing Company and The Saturday Evening Post

    Before the internet, before television, before radio, there were magazines.  Philadelphia was the place you wanted to be if you were in the magazine business.  It had the best presses, the best printers, and the railroads to get them where they needed to go.  Cyrus H.K. Curtis was the king of magazine publishing, but could only do it with the help of two amazing editors – his wife, Louisa Knapp Curtis, and his hire from Boston, George Horace Lorimer.  Lorimer needed the help of another Philadelphian, Adelaide Walbaum Neall, to make the Post a success.  And while everyone thinks of Norman Rockwell as the painter of Saturday Evening Post covers, Katharine Richardson Wireman was painting covers for the Post and the Journal long before Rockwell.  And when Curtis built his headquarters Building on 6th and Walnut, he hired a local architect Edgar Viguers Seeler.  All six of these people are buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery or West Laurel Hill Cemetery.

    • 48 min
    On with the Show! - Edward Fry, Adam Forepaugh, and J. Fred Zimmerman

    On with the Show! - Edward Fry, Adam Forepaugh, and J. Fred Zimmerman

    Edward Fry was impresario for the Astor Place Opera in 1849 at the time of the famed Shakespeare riots, when dozens of New Yorkers were killed.  Adam Forepaugh was a wealthy horse trader who more-or-less accidentally took over a circus, but gave P.T. Barnum a run for his money in post-Civil War America.  J. Fred Zimmerman was one of a small group of men, fittingly called the Theatre Syndicate, who controlled a majority of theatres on the east coast, essentially determining what plays would be staged and what actors would work. 

    • 54 min
    Quarantine Special: She's Not There - Florence Leontine Lowe (“Pancho” Barnes), Ethel Huhn “Bobo” Bailey, and Princess Olga Demidoff Troubetzskoy Stoever

    Quarantine Special: She's Not There - Florence Leontine Lowe (“Pancho” Barnes), Ethel Huhn “Bobo” Bailey, and Princess Olga Demidoff Troubetzskoy Stoever

    Ethel Huhn Bailey was the spoiled daughter of the spoiled second wife of Philadelphia multimillionaire George Arthur Huhn, who is buried on Millionaire’s Row.  Florence Leontine Lowe was the granddaughter of Philadelphia builder and architect Richard Dobbins; under her nickname and married name of Pancho Barnes, she became a stunt pilot and opened a popular drinking spot for test pilots near Muroc Air Field.  Princess Olga Demidoff Troubetzskoy Stoever was briefly the wife of Germantown-born and raised archeologist and businessman Edward Royal Stoever; her life is the thing of legends.  None of the women are buried at Laurel Hill, but they have great stories.  

    • 50 min
    On the Tube: Dave Garroway, Anne Francine, Edie Huggins, and Sheela Allen-Stephens

    On the Tube: Dave Garroway, Anne Francine, Edie Huggins, and Sheela Allen-Stephens

    Dave Garroway was one of the most successful announcers in the early days of television, but things fell apart when he walked away from "The Today Show."  Main Line socialite Anne Francine might be better remembered for her time on stage or in cabaret performances, but she spent a memorable season in a TV show starring Barbara Eden.  And anyone who lived in Philadelphia over the past 40 years knew about Edie Huggins and Sheela Allen-Stephens.  Four permanent residents of Laurel Hill Cemetery and West Laurel Hill Cemetery who found a place "On the Tube." 

    • 49 min

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